Subject: Studies in the News 03-83 (December 18, 2003)


CALIFORNIA RESEARCH BUREAU
CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY
Studies in the News


California -- One Hundred and Fifty Years Ago

1853 - "The College of California, founded in 1853 as the Contra Costa Academy, and patterned after the great New England colleges, offered a thoroughly classical curriculum of Latin and Greek to children under 'the pervading influence and spirit of the Christian religion.' The head of the College was Rev. Henry Durant of Yale (many of the original founders were Yale men), who later became the first President of the University. After two short years, Durant stepped down as University President; Daniel Coit Gilman, later the founding President of Johns Hopkins University, took his place. Gilman sought to create an institution which would live up to the noble title of a 'University.' Cal wouldn't just be a teaching college, but a university aimed specifically at helping the people of California. http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/CalHistory/brief-history.1.html "    

1853 - "In 1853, before a mile of railroad track had been laid in the state, a law was passed making it illegal to charge more than 20 cents a mile for transporting passengers. http://www.cpuc.ca.gov/published/report/27963.pdf"    

Contents This Week

Introductory Material CALIFORNIA READER
   State of the state
CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT
   Correctional officers burnout and stress
   Trends in delinquency cases
   Public versus private prisons
   Internet sex crimes against minors
   Strengthening victim services
CULTURE AND SOCIETY
   The concept of race
   California's newest immigrants
   Hispanic immigrants send billions to native countries
   Latino voting reveals diverse views
ECONOMY
   Internet use by children and teens
   Decline of purchasing power
   Displacement of U.S. production
   FCC on Voice Over Internet (VOIP)
   Broadband market
EDUCATION
   College readiness rates in the states
   Citizenship education
   Community college enrollment falling
   California K-12 finance
   Cost comparisons for California's public colleges
   CSU fees lower than competitors
EMPLOYMENT
   History of California Workers' Compensation
   Workers' compensation disability ratings
ENVIRONMENT & NATURAL RESOURCES
   Klamath River water flow
   National parks bring economic gain
   Forecast for wildfire severity
GENERAL GOVERNMENT
   Bias in mediation and arbitration
   Mandatory arbitration
   Federal appropriations impacting California
   Public workers win ruling on discrimination
   Progressive agenda for the states
   Public Education Facilities Bond Act
   Colorado redistricting unconstitutional
   Proposed enrollment caps for health and human services
   State's cash flow
   Federal policies and states' fiscal woes
HEALTH
   Workers' chronic pain costly to employers
   Role of U.S. government in health care
   Reimbursement for immigrant health services
   Provisions for free hospital care
   Coverage of the uninsured
   Effect of uninsured on hospital use
HOUSING
   Increases in homeownership
   Housing discrimination for Native Americans
HUMAN SERVICES
   Self-sufficiency standard for California
   Working families and food assistance
   State fiscal crisis threaten non-profit services
   Social program spending and state fiscal crises
   Well-being in early adulthood
TRANSPORTATION
   Shortfalls in transportation funding
   Guidance on drivers' license security
   Drivers license legislation update
   Status of identification security
   Motor vehicle administrators' guidelines
WASHINGTON READER
   California Institute's briefing on federal issues
STUDIES TO COME
   Slow job growth predicted
   Dismantling of affirmative action
   Work-based learning and education reform
   Atlas of California biodiversity
   Electronic medical records system
Introduction to Studies in the News

Studies in the News is a very current compilation of items significant to the Legislature and Governor's Office. It is created weekly by the State Library's Research Bureau to supplement the public policy debate in California’s Capitol. To help share the latest information with state policymakers, these reading lists are now being made accessible through the State Library’s website. This week's list of current articles in various public policy areas is presented below.

Service to State Employees:

  • When available, the URL for the full text of each item is provided.

  • Items in the State Library collection can be checked out to state officials and staff.

  • Access to all materials listed will be provided by the State Information Reference Center, either by e-mail to cslsirc@library.ca.gov or by calling 654-0261.

The following studies are currently on hand:

CALIFORNIA READER

State of the State Conference 2003: Briefing Book. By Ross DeVol and others, the Milken Institute (The Institute, Santa Monica) October 30, 2003. 133 p.

["The information contained in the Briefing Book offers a realistic, nonpartisan assessment of California and its economy. [The authors] examine everything from the cost of energy, housing and health care to labor, international trade and the state's business climate."]

[Request #S9789]

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CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT

CORRECTIONS

"Correctional Officers' Burnout and Stress: Does Gender Matter?" By Joseph R. Carlson and others. IN: The Prison Journal, vol. 83, no. 3 (September 2003) pp. 277-288.

["In this study, 277 correctional officers were administered the Maslach Burnout Inventory.... Contrary to earlier stress studies conducted in the 1980s, women correctional officers demonstrated a greater sense of job-related personal achievement and accomplishment than their men counterparts."]

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JUVENILE DELINQUENCY

Juvenile Court Statistics 1999: Celebrating 100 years of the Juvenile Court. By Charles Puzzanchers and others, National Center for Juvenile Justice. NCJ 201241. (The Center, Washington, DC) July 2003. 117 p.

Full Text at: www.ncjrs.org/pdffiles1/ojjdp/201241.pdf

["The report profiles the nearly 1.7 million delinquency cases handled by courts with juvenile jurisdiction in 1999 and reviews trends from 1990 through 1999."]

[Request #S9786]

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PRIVATIZATION

"Comparing the Quality of Confinement and Cost-Effectiveness of Public Versus Private Prisons: What We Know, Why We Do Not Know More, And Where To Go From Here." By Dina Perrone and Travis C. Pratt. IN: The Prison Journal, vol. 83, no. 3 (September 2003) pp. 301-322.

["This article contains a systematic review of the evaluation literature comparing the costs and quality of confinement of public versus private prisons... [and] highlights ... the direction that future research may take to advance a better understanding of the potential advantages and disadvantages of prison privatization."]

[Request #S9797]

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SEXUAL ABUSE

Internet Sex Crimes Against Minors: The Response of Law Enforcement. By Janis Wolak and others, Crimes Against Children Research Center, University of New Hampshire. Prepared for the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children, U.S. Department of Justice. (The Center, Durham, New Hampshire) November 2003. 36 p.

Full Text at: www.missingkids.org/en_US/publications/NC132.pdf

["The study reveals that considerable portions of arrests for Internet sex crimes against minors (25%) are of offenders who solicited undercover law-enforcement agents.... This study gives evidence of considerable law-enforcement activity in response to these threats and implementation of both novel and conventional strategies with some success."]

[Request #S9798]

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VICTIMS

Strengthening Victim Services in California: A Proposal for Consolidation, Coordination, and Victim-Centered Leadership: A Report to the Legislature. By the California State and Consumer Services Agency. (The Agency, Sacramento, California) November 2003. 105 p.

Full Text at: www.scsa.ca.gov/strength_victim_services.pdf

["Agency Recommends Victim Services Be Consolidated: California's myriad crime victim programs should be consolidated into a single new Office for Victim Services, similar to the way such services are administered in 28 other states.... Currently, assistance and compensation programs are provided by at least 17 state agencies, departments and offices." Daily Bulletin (November 22, 2003) 1.]

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CULTURE AND SOCIETY

ETHNIC CATEGORIES

"Does Race Exist?" By Michael J. Bamshad and Steve E. Olson. IN: Scientific American, vol. 289, no. 6 (December 2003) pp. 78-85.

["The outward signs on which most definitions of race are based -- such as skin color and hair texture -- are dictated by a handful of genes. But the other genes of two people of the same 'race' can be very different. Conversely, two people of different 'races' can share more genetic similarity than two individuals of the same race.... The medical implications of racial genetic differences are still under debate."]

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IMMIGRANTS

California's Newest Immigrants. By Laura E. Hill and Joseph M. Hayes, Public Policy Institute of California. California Counts Population Trends and Profiles. Vol. 5, No. 2. (The Institute, San Francisco, California) November 2003. 20 p.

Full Text at: www.ppic.org/content/pubs/CC_1103LHCC.pdf

["The disproportionate number of undereducated immigrants is opening increasing income gaps and stressing the social fabric.... The study shows the huge education gaps between new immigrants from Latin America and those from Asia." San Mateo County Times (November 28, 2003) 1.]

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LATINOS

"Remittance Senders and Receivers: Tracking the Transnational Channels." By Robert Suro, Pew Hispanic Center. (The Center, Los Angeles, California) 2003. 20 p.

Full Text at: www.pewhispanic.org/site/docs/pdf/Remittances%20Senders%20and%20Receivers%20LAC%202003%20Final.pdf

["Hispanic Immigrants Send Money Home: More than 40 percent of adult Hispanic immigrants in the United States regularly send money to relatives in their native countries, a flow of funds totaling nearly $30 billion this year, a new study finds....The amount far exceeds the total U.S. foreign aid flowing to all nations- $17.2 billion this fiscal year." Findlaw.com (November 24, 2003).]

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"Independence Day: Latinos Didn't Conform to Either Party's Expectations in California's Special Election." By Kathryn Jean Lopez. IN: Hispanic (December 2003) pp. 24-25.

["A little more than 40 percent voted either for movie action-hero Arnold Schwarzenegger or State Senator Tom McClintock.... While Hispanics mostly identify with Democrats, their ties to the party don't run very deep. The message Hispanics sent loud and clear many observers say, is a declaration of independence."]

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ECONOMY

INTERNET

Computer and Internet Use By Children and Adolescents in 2001. By Matthew DeBell, Education Statistics Services Institute, and Chris Chapman, National Center for Education Statistics. (NCES, Washington, DC) October 2003. 67 p.

Full Text at: nces.ed.gov/pubs2004/2004014.pdf

["This report examines the overall rate of use, the ways in which children and teens use the technologies, where the use occurs (home, school, and other locations), and the relationships of these aspects of computer and Internet use to demographic and socioeconomic characteristics such as children’s age and race/ethnicity and their parents’ education and family income."]

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LOS ANGELES

The Puzzle of the Los Angeles Economy: A Look at the Last Thirty Years. By Paul Tepper and Jessica Barret Simpson, Institute for the Study of Homelessness and Poverty, Weingart Center. (The Institute, Los Angeles, California) October 2003. 8 p.

Full Text at: www.weingart.org/institute/research/other/pdf/PuzzleLAEconomy.pdf

["This report on the Los Angeles economy since 1970 addresses issues of declining household income, job growth in low-paying sectors, sky-rocketing housing costs, rising poverty, and the widening gap between wealthy families and others. The authors conclude that it is harder to make ends meet now than it was thirty years ago." Moving Ideas News (November 26, 2003) 1.]

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NAFTA

The High Price of 'Free' Trade: NAFTA's Failure Has Cost the United States Jobs Across the Nation. By Robert E. Scott, Economic Policy Institute. Briefing Paper. (The Institute, Washington, DC) November 2003. 13 p.

Full Text at: www.epinet.org/briefingpapers/147/epi_bp147.pdf

["The Economic Policy Institute ... calculates that since NAFTA was enacted, America's swelling trade deficit with its partners has cost about 766,000 U.S. jobs on a net basis. Those trade deficits, which show little sign of easing, represent a 'continuing drag on U.S. growth and job creation.'" Sacramento Bee (November 23, 2003) D1.]

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TELECOMMUNICATIONS

FCC Treatment of Voice over IP: Past, Present, Future. By Russ Hanser and Jennifer McKee, Wireline Competition Bureau, Federal Communications Commission. (The Commission, Washington D.C.) 2003. 8 p.

Full Text at: www.fcc.gov/voip/presentations/fcc-wcb.pdf

["The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) held a hearing on Voice over Internet Protocol, [VOIP] a technology that lets people make phone calls over the Internet -- at a cost below that of traditional calls. The forum marks the first step toward likely regulation of the market, observers say. Any action the FCC takes could have a big impact on companies like SBC Communications, which are threatened by Voice over IP but are also starting to offer it." Chicago Sun Times, December 1, 2003 (online)]

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Does the Residential Broadband Market Need Fixing? By the Congressional Budget Office. A CBO Paper. (The Office, Washington, DC) December 2003. 52 p.

["CBO Says Federal Subsidies Will Not Aid Broadband, Adoption: The report states that the residential broadband market is thriving, and government subsidies to providers would not lower costs or increase the rate of adoption.... The report found that FCC regulations requiring local telecommunications providers to lease their networks to competitors did not prevent local providers from investing in network enhancements." National Journal's Technology Daily (December 5, 2003) 1.]

ftp://ftp.cbo.gov/48xx/doc4868/12-03-Broadband.pdf

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EDUCATION

ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT

Public High School Graduation and College Readiness Rates in the United States. By Jay Greene and Greg Foster, Manhattan Institute for Policy Research. Education Working Paper No. 3. (The Institute, New York, New York) 2003. 32 p.

Full Text at: www.manhattan-institute.org/ewp_03.pdf

["30% Don't Graduate on Time, Study Finds; High School Students Unprepared for College, Poised for Low Income: Almost one-third of American high school student do not graduate on time, leading to a lifetime of lower income and limited opportunities.... The study also estimates that 32 percent of students nationally graduate high school ready for college-level work." Boston Globe (September 17, 2003) A2.]

[Request #S9809]

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CIVICS

State Policies To Support Citizenship Education. By the National Center for Learning and Citizenship, Education Commission of the States. (The Center, Denver, Colorado) November 2003. 8 p.

Full Text at: www.ecs.org/clearinghouse/48/94/4894.pdf

["Civics Should Be A Higher Priority, State Education Group Concludes: A New Survey shows that schools and state governments could do more to help children learn how to participate more fully in democracy. The Education Commission of the States found that 41 states have laws requiring students to learn about government, civics or citizenship, but only five states require a high school exit exam in civics or related topics." ECS E-Clips (November 21, 2003) 1.]

[Request #S9810]

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HIGHER EDUCATION

California Community Colleges Fall 2003 Preliminary Enrollment Report. By the California Community Colleges Chancellor's Office. (The Office, Long Beach, California) November 4, 2003.

["Community College Enrollment Falls Again; Cuts Blamed: A survey by the state chancellor's office shows that student enrollment at the system's 108 community college campuses fell by 90,700 from the same time last year -- a drop of 5.2 percent. College officials blame dwindling enrollment on budget cuts that forced campuses to slash an estimated 15,000 classes." Sacramento Bee (November 5, 2003) A3.]

Press Release. 2 p.
www.cccco.edu/news/press/press_2003/press_november/press_110403.htm

Report. 11 p.
http://www.cccco.edu/news/press/press_2003/press_november/fall_enrollment.pdf

[Request #S9811]

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SCHOOL FINANCE

School Finance Highlights 2003-04: Executive Summary. By EdSource. (EdSource, Palo Alto, California) November 2003. 2 p.

Full Text at: www.edsource.org/pdf/schfinHighlights03-04.pdf

["California's school finance system is the 800-pound gorilla that has yet to be tamed. The last few years have made clear just how central the education budget is to the state's overall budget planning process.... New expenditures ... were laid on top of a funding mechanism that is complex.... Californians may take on these issues in 2004."]

[Request #S9812]

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STUDENT FEES

Frequently Asked Questions Concerning Student Fees and Financial Aid in California's Public Colleges and Universities. By the California Postsecondary Education Commission. (The Commission, Sacramento, California) 2003. 3 p.

Full Text at: www.cpec.ca.gov/CompleteReports/2003OtherPublications/OP03-01.pdf

["California's Community Colleges are the least expensive of any community college in the entire nation.... The State and its taxpayers provide about $12,000 to support the postsecondary education of each full-time-equivalent [FTE] student at the University of California, about $8,000 [FTE] at the California State University; ... $4,000 [FTE] at the California Community Colleges."]

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"2003/2004 Student Fee Report." By Richard West, Executive Vice Chancellor. Presented to the Committee on Finance, Board of Trustees, California State University. IN: Agenda Packet (November 19, 2003) pp. 9-12.

Full Text at: www.calstate.edu/BOT/Agendas/Nov03/Finance.pdf

["Despite steep increases in the past two years, California State University tuition is still the lowest among comparable institutions across the nation, according to a report presented Wednesday to system trustees. Average annual fees at CSU are $2,572 -- more than $250 less than the system's nearest competitor, the University of Nevada, Reno." Oakland Tribune, November 20, 2003. (online).]

[Request #S9814]

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EMPLOYMENT

WORKERS COMPENSATION

The Evolution of Workers' Compensation Policy in California: 1911 - 1990: Ph.D. Thesis in Public Policy. By Glenn Merrill Shor (The Author, Berkeley, California) 1990. 363 p.

["Workers' compensation was a Progressive Era response to problems associated with high rates of industrial injury... The study traces the early development of compensation for occupational disease, competition between private insurers and a nonprofit State insurance fund, and programs of injury and illness prevention ... and political obstacles to reform."]

[Request #S9787]

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Evaluation of California's Permanent Disability Rating Schedule. Interim Report. By Robert T. Reville and others, RAND Institute for Civil Justice. Prepared for the California Commission on Health and Safety and Workers' Compensation. (RAND, Santa Monica, California) December 2003. 56 p.

Full Text at: www.rand.org/publications/DB/DB443/DB443.pdf

["The rating schedule, which is used to determine eligibility for Partial Permanent Disability benefits as well as the amount of benefits, is at the center of legislative debates to reduce the costs of the workers’ compensation system. We address several questions: Does the system ensure that the highest compensation goes to the most severely disabled individuals? Do injured workers with impairments to different parts of the body but similar employment outcomes receive similar compensation? Will different physicians evaluating the same injury produce similar ratings? And finally, how can the rating system be changed to improve outcomes for injured workers and employers in California?" ]

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ENVIRONMENT & NATURAL RESOURCES

FISH

The Undepleted Natural Flow Of the Upper Klamath River. By U. S. Bureau of Reclamation, Department of the Interior. Draft. (The Department, Klamath Falls, Oregon) December 5, 2003. 78 p.

Full Text at: www.usbr.gov/mp/kbao/docs/DraftFinalRpt.pdf

["Once made final, the report could start a domino effect of report and policy changes that would change how much water goes down to the Pacific from Iron Gate Dam, the main flow control dam on the Klamath River. Flows from Iron Gate now are governed by a biological opinion written by the U.S. National Marine Fisheries Service and designed to protect endangered coho salmon." Klamath Herald and News (December 7, 2003) online.]

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NATIONAL PARKS

National Treasures as Economic Engines: The Economic Impact of Visitor Spending in California's National Parks. By National Parks Conservation Association. (The Association, Washington, DC) November 6, 2003. 14 p.

Full Text at: www.npca.org/across_the_nation/npca_in_the_field/pacific/economic_report/mgm.pdf

["Fiscal Study: Parks A Natural. The U.S. Showplaces Support 212,000 Jobs, Researchers Say: A new study of the country's national parks concludes that they aren't just rich in natural beauty, but they are also an economic boon. The study found that visitors to Yosemite spend $320 million annually, directly supporting 7,527 jobs." Sacramento Bee (November 11, 2003) D3.]

[Request #S9841]

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WILDFIRES

"The Impact of Climate Change On Wildfire Severity: A Regional Forecast For Northern California." By Jeremy S. Fried and others. IN: Climatic Change (2003) pp. 1-23.

["Wildfires Could Worsen with Global Warming: Fires that charred nearly three-quarters of a million acres could presage increasingly severe fire danger as global warming weakens more forests through disease and drought, experts warn.... Windier weather could bring to Northen California a variation of the desert Santa Ana winds that whipped the Southern California blazes into firestorms." CNN.com (November 12, 2003) 1.]

[Request #S9842]

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GENERAL GOVERNMENT

DISPUTE RESOLUTION

"Bias in Mediation and Arbitration." By Frederick Hertz. IN: California Lawyer (November 2003) pp. 37-39.

["Mediation, despite its image as a neutral procedure in which all values are honored equally and all parties are free to express their points of view, can often be skewed by biases ... which can powerfully impact the outcome of a settlement.... [Listed are] the first steps in addressing the impact of bias in the alternative dispute process."]

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"Alternative Dispute Resolution: When Mandatory Arbitration Isn't Mandatory." By James V. Fazio. IN: California Lawyer (November 2003) pp. 15-16.

["Federal and California courts alike have resolved doubts about arbitration in its favor. Despite the policies favoring arbitration agreements, however, courts refuse to enforce them for a number of reasons."]

[Request #S9816]

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FEDERAL BUDGET

Omnibus Appropriations and California Implications: Fiscal Year 2004: Special Report. By California Institute for Federal Policy Research. (The Institute, Washington, DC) December 2003. 25 p.

Full Text at: www.calinst.org/pubs/omn04c.pdf

["On November 25, 2003, House and Senate Conferees combined seven unfinished appropriations bills into the 2004 Omnibus Consolidated Appropriations Act, HR 2673, providing a total of $820 billion in FY04 funding. The measure also contains a 0.59 percent across-the-board cut ... that most agencies will have to take in FY04 funding.... [Includes] a quick analysis of the Omnibus Appropriations from a California perspective."]

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GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES

Steve Schifando v. City of Los Angeles. California Supreme Court. S106660. December 1, 2003. 44 p.

Full Text at: www.courtinfo.ca.gov/opinions/documents/S106660.PDF

["By a 5-2 vote, the state Supreme Court ruled that city, county and state employees have the same right as private workers to go immediately to a state agency that processes discrimination claims before they go to court. The decision was a setback for cities that were hoping to cut litigation costs by dealing with discrimination claims internally. Sixty-one cities filed a brief in support of Los Angeles." San Francisco Chronicle (December 2, 2003) A23.]

[Request #S9818]

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GOVERNMENT FINANCE

A Blueprint for the States: 2003 Progressive Agenda. Edited by Liz Cattaneo and others, Center for Policy Alternatives. (The Center, Washington, DC) 2003. 344 p.

Full Text at: www.stateaction.org/2003agenda/

["This edition is crafted with state budget realities in mind. While it covers 50 important subjects and includes 53 model laws, the great majority of our policy alternatives are designed to spend very little or no state funds. In fact, several of our new policy models are progressive fund raisers."]

[Request #S9819]

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PROPOSITIONS

Proposition 55: Kindergarten-University Public Education Facilities Bond Act of 2004. By the Legislative Analyst's Office. (The Office, Sacramento, California) November 2003. 5 p.

Full Text at: www.lao.ca.gov/initiatives/2004/55_03_2004.htm

["This measure allows the state to issue $12.3 billion of general obligation bonds for construction and renovation of K-12 school facilities ($10 billion) and higher education facilities ($2.3 billion).... The average payment for principal and interest would be about $823 million per year.... If the voters do not approve this measure, state law requires the same bond issue to be placed on the November 2004 ballot."]

[Request #S9820]

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REDISTRICTING

Salazar v. Davidson. Colorado Supreme Court. 03SA133. December 1, 2003. 92 p.

Full Text at: www.courts.state.co.us/supct/opinions/2003/03SA13303SA147.doc

["The court argued that in the interest of fairness, redistricting could be done only once every 10 years, when a new census came out.... Democrats successfully argued that redistricting already had occurred in 2002, when a federal judge in Denver drew up congressional boundaries after a divided General Assembly couldn't agree on what they should be." Los Angeles Times (December 2, 2003) A15]

[Request #S9821]

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STATE BUDGET

Governor Proposes To Cap Enrollment In Various Health and Human Services Programs. By the California Budget Project. (The Project, Sacramento, California) December 2003. 2 p.

Full Text at: www.cbp.org/2003/031209enrollmentcaps.pdf

["The Schwarzenegger Administration released proposed mid-year budget reductions totaling $1.9 billion in the current year and $1.9 billion in the upcoming budget year. As part of these reductions, the Governor has proposed to cap enrollment in a range of health and social services programs, for General Fund savings of $11.2 million in 2003-04 and $85.9 million in 2004-05."]

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Economic Update and Monthly Cash Report. By the California Department of Finance. Finance Bulletin. (The Department, Sacramento, California) November 2003. 2 p.

Full Text at: www.dof.ca.gov/HTML/FINBULL/nov03.HTM

["Year-to-date, revenues are $728 million above forecast.... In total General Fund agency cash for October was $1.924 billion below the 2003 Budget Act forecast of $6,602 billion. However, this is a cash flow loss only, due to the fact that $2,264 billion in tobacco bond revenues were received at the end of September, rather than October."]

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STATE FINANCES

Federal Policies Contribute to the Severity of the State Fiscal Crisis. By Iris J. Lav, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. (The Center, Washington, DC) December 3, 2003. 13 p.

Full Text at: www.cbpp.org/10-17-03sfp.pdf

["Even as Republicans in Washington go on a spend-and-borrow spree and high-five each other about third quarter GDP figures, the fiscal picture in the 50 states, which typically must balance budgets, remains dark. In a new update of its continuing analysis of the state fiscal crisis, those intrepid number-crunchers at the Center show there's not much light in sight. NCSL Grasscatcher (December 5, 2003) 1.]

[Request #S9824]

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HEALTH

BACK PAIN

"Lost Productive Time and Cost Due to Common Pain Conditions in the U.S. Workforce." By Walter Stewart and others. IN: JAMA: Journal of the American Medical Association (November 12, 2003) pp. 2443-2454.

["Worker Pain Costs More Than $60 Billion, Study Finds: Headaches, back pain, arthritis and other muscle and joint pain cost the nation's employers more than $60 billion a year in lost productivity, a study has found.... Most of these costs are from sub-par performance as a result of the pain rather than absenteeism." Contra Costa Times (November 12, 2003) F4.]

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HEALTH CARE

“Obtaining Greater Value From Health Care: The Roles of the U.S. Government." By Stephen C. Schoenbaum and others. IN: Health Affairs, vol. 22, no. 6 (December 2003) pp. 183-190.

Full Text at: www.healthaffairs.org/CMWF/Schoenbaum.pdf

["The authors argue for creation of a new independent federal agency that would set national priorities for quality and develop standards of care.... The federal government has the power, the authors say, to direct action to improve health care and set the stage for others to follow." Commonwealth Fund (November 13, 2003) 1.]

[Request #S9826]

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IMMIGRATION & IMMIGRANTS

Senate Proposed Reimbursement for Emergency Health Services to Undocumented Aliens Based on Unauthorized Resident Population and Apprehensions by State. By the California Institute for Federal Policy Research. (The Institute, Washington, DC) December 2003. 3 p.

Full Text at: www.calinst.org/datapages/undocumented.htm

["Emergency Health Services Funding Included in Medicare Bill: California to Receive Approximately $72 Million Annually, Starting in 2005. According to the Department of Homeland Security, California housed 31.6 percent of the nation's total undocumented immigrants in a 2000 estimation."]

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UNINSURED

Not There When You Need It: The Search for Free Hospital Care. By the Community Catalyst, Inc. (The Catalyst, Boston, Massachusetts) October 2003. 60 p.

Full Text at: www.communitycatalyst.org/acrobat/Not_There_When_You_Need_It_The%20Search.pdf

["Hospitals Not Telling Uninsured Patients About Free Care Options, Group Claims: Many hospitals often are unable or unwilling to explain to uninsured patients about available free care options, and instead will pursue payment from such patients through collection agencies, sometimes driving them into bankruptcy." BNA Health Care Policy Report (November 3, 2003) 1395.]

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"Battery-Powered Health Insurance? Stability in Coverage Of The Uninsured." By Pamela Farley Short and Deborah R. Graefe. IN: Health Affairs, vol. 22, no. 6 (November/December 2003) pp. 244-255.

["This study assesses the stability of Americans' health insurance status over a four-year period. Relatively few Americans were continuously uninsured for the four years 1996 to 1999, but a sizable number of the uninsured lacked a stable source of coverage.... Policymakers should think of 'uninsured' as referring not to people, but rather to gaps in coverage over time. Reforms that stop short of universal coverage should be evaluated in terms of their likely effect on the continuity and stability of coverage."]

[Request #S9829]

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"Who Walks Through the Door? The Effect of The Uninsured on Hospital Use." By Catherine G. McLaughlin and Karoline Mortensen. IN: Health Affairs, vol. 22, no. 6 (November/December 2003) pp. 143-155.

["Hospitals are concerned about the implications of an increase in the number of uninsured people. We calculate what percentage of hospital inpatient, emergency department, and outpatient visits are accounted for by uninsured people and predict how those shares would change under three different scenarios.... This finding reflects the relatively low utilization rates among those most likely to lose coverage, nonelderly, nonpregnant, and nondisabled workers and their families."]

[Request #S9830]

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HOUSING

AFFORDABLE HOUSING

The Causes of Increase in Homeownership in the 1990s. By Stuart A. Gabriel, University of Southern California and Stuart S. Rosenthal, Syracuse University. Prepared for the Research Institute for Housing America. Working Paper 03-01. (The Institute, Washington, DC) October 2003. 44 p.

Full Text at: www.housingamerica.org/docs/Homeownership_1990s.pdf

["Home Ownership Climbed in '90s: Higher incomes, better employment opportunities and declining interest rates helped many more people afford a home, as did reduced financing costs, new consumer-friendly mortgages and media attention, concluded the authors of the report." Milwaukee Journal Sentinel (October 26, 2003) 1F.]

[Request #S9831]

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DISCRIMINATION

Discrimination In Metropolitan Housing Markets: Phase 3 - Native Americans. By Margery Austin Turner and Stephen L. Ross,The Urban Institute. Prepared for U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. (The Institute, Washington DC) 2003. 92 p.

Full Text at: www.huduser.org/Publications/pdf/hds_phase3_final.pdf

["This report offers invaluable assistance by documenting where and how discriminatory practices take place.... The findings will enable HUD to devote more attention, including enforcement that penalizes illegal discrimination to communities with significant Native American populations."]

[Request #S9832]

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HUMAN SERVICES

FAMILIES

The Self-Sufficiency Standard for California 2003. By Diana Pearce and Jennifer Brooks, Wider Opportunities for Women. Prepared for Californians for Family Economic Self-Sufficiency, National Economic Development and Law Center. (The Center, Oakland, California) December 2003. 87 p.

Full Text at: www.nedlc.org/cfess/CA%20Final.pdf

["The report is a studied look at how dramatically the cost of raising a family has risen in California.... Families in a third of California's counties require an hourly wage of $15 just to make ends meet. Housing in California takes a huge chunk of working families' income.... In Sacramento, housing costs have risen 51 percent since 2000." Sacramento Bee (December 9, 2003) B1.]

[Request #S9833]

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HUNGER

Many Families Turn to Food Pantries for Help. By Sheila R. Zedlewski and Sandi Nelson, The Urban Institute. Snapshots3 of America's Families, No. 17. (The Institute, Washington, DC) November 2003. 2 p.

Full Text at: www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/310895_snapshots3_no17.pdf

["According to this brief, food pantries help to reduce hunger and hardship in the United States. Many families, including working families with children, use these local resources to supplement their income. Even families earning a poverty-level income (about $1,250 per month for a family of three) can be stretched when they need to cover housing, health, child care and food costs. Also, some families' incomes fluctuate during the year, and they need temporary help to get by."]

[Request #S9834]

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NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS

A Divided Community: The Effects Of State Fiscal Crises On Nonprofits Providing Health and Social Assistance. By Thomas Gais and others, The Nelson A. Rockefeller Institute of Government. Prepared for the Aspen Institute. (The Institute, Albany, New York) November 3, 2003. 44 p.

Full Text at: stateandlocalgateway.rockinst.org/fiscal_pub/other/docs/Final_Paper_111.pdf

["This paper examines the current state revenue crisis, demand for social services, the distribution of social assistance nonprofits, and both long-run and short-run changes in state expenditures to estimate the effects of state fiscal crises on the nonprofit sector associated with human service programs. The study finds division among nonprofits that affect the severity of these effects."]

[Request #S9835]

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SOCIAL POLICY

Social Program Spending and State Fiscal Crises. By Kenneth Finegold and others, Urban Institute. Occasional Paper 70. (The Institute, Washington, DC) November 2003. 106 p.

Full Text at: www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/310888_OP70.pdf

["This analysis of seven states (including California) shows that the severity of the current revenue crisis far exceeds that of the recession that triggered it because states cut taxes and expanded programs based on unsustainable revenue growth during the late 1990s." Assessing the New Federalism (December 4, 2003) 1.]

[Request #S9836]

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YOUTH

Connected by 25: Improving the Life Chances of the Country's Most Vulnerable 14-24 Year Olds. By Michael Wald and Tia Martinez, Stanford University. Prepared for the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation. Working Paper. (The Foundation, Menlo Park, California) November 2003. 30 p.

Full Text at: www.hewlett.org/NR/rdonlyres/60C17B69-8A76-4F99-BB3B-84251E4E5A19/0/FinalVersionofDisconnectedYouthPaper.pdf

["There's growing evidence that the kids may not be all right, after all, and that at the very least, young people lack needed supports. Too many young adults face big hurdles to self-sufficiency, health and social well-being.... One in five young male adults is in prison or disengaged from schooling and employment.... The financial costs will continue to climb as the young adult population increases." Children of Prisoners (November 26, 2003) 1.]

[Request #S9837]

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TRANSPORTATION

CALIFORNIA

Transportation 2030 Plan: Final Phase 1 Recommendations. By the Metropolitan Transportation Commission. (The Commission, Oakland, California (December 2003) Various pagings.

Full Text at: www.mtc.ca.gov/T2030/12-12-03/PhaseOne-FinalRecs.doc

["An analysis reveals an unprecedented $14 billion shortfall in funds that maintain roads and public transit. It includes street repairs, station upgrades and replacement buses and trains.... If the Bay Area spent every extra dime it expects to collect for transportation in the next 25 years, it still would not take care of the highways and transit it already operates." Contra Costa Times (December 12, 2003) A1.]

[Request #S9838]

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DRIVERS' LICENSES

Driver's License Integrity: Executive Summary. By Albert Harberson and Eileen Doherty. (Council of State Governments and National Conference of State Legislatures) June 25, 2002. 37 p.; Appendices.

Full Text at: www.csg.org/nr/csg/attachments/csg_drivers_license.pdf

["States have moved rapidly to address a variety of issues that were highlighted by the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, related to driver's license issuance, administration and enforcement, and verifiability.... The purpose of this document is to define the issues that states must address in order to improve driver's license integrity and to propose a variety of options for state officials' consideration."]

[Request #S9790]

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Driver's License and Identification Card Issues: 2003 State Legislative Update. By Reed F. Morris and Catherine Chan, National Conference of State Legislatures. (NCSL, Denver, Colorado) September 2003. 19 p.

Full Text at: www.ncsl.org/programs/esnr/03driverlicIDiss.pdf

[Includes: "General Identity Documentation Requirements;" "Lawful Presence Requirements;" "Selective Service Registration; Hardened Licenses;" "Consular Identification;" and more.]

[Request #S9791]

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Enhancing Driver's License Administration and Identification Security. By the American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators. (The Association, Washington, DC) September 2003. 6 p.

Full Text at: www.aamva.org/Documents/idsSeptember2003StatusReport2.pdf

["The American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators ... recommended that all jurisdictions that have a legal presence requirement tie the expiration date of the driver's license/identification card to the Bureau of Citizenship and Immigration Services document dates."]

[Request #S9792]

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Acceptable Verifiable ID Resources List and Administrative Procedures Manual. By the American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators. (The Association, Washington, DC) 2003. 12 p.

Full Text at: www.aamva.org/Documents/idsAttach1StatReportJuly03.pdf

["In May 2003, the American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators' Board of Directors approved the [procedures] as part of a new process for customer identification in the United States and Canada... Currently, the foreign passport is the only acceptable, verifiable foreign document that should be used for identification purposes." ]

[Request #S9839]

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WASHINGTON READER

California Capitol Hill Bulletin. By the California Institute For Federal Policy Research. Vol. 10, Bulletin 36 (The Institute, Washington, DC) December 11, 2003. 5 p.

Full Text at: www.calinst.org/bulletins/b1036.pdf

[Includes: "Reimbursement for Serving Undocumented Immigrants -- California Likely To Receive $72 Million Per Year from 2005 to 2008;" "Ambitious House Highway Reauthorization Plan Floated;" "Homeland Security Announces 2004 Port Security Grants, California's $33.7 Million to Represent 19 Percent of U.S. Total;" and others.]

[Request #S9793]

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STUDIES TO COME
[The following studies, reports, and documents have been ordered or requested, but have not yet arrived. Requests may be placed, and copies will be provided when the material arrives.]

ECONOMY

CALIFORNIA

The UCLA Anderson Forecast for the Nation and California. By the UCLA Anderson Forecasting Project, Anderson Graduate School of Management. And Quarterly Business Forecast Seminar: Packet. By Tom Lieser, Anderson Graduate School of Management, and others. (The School, Los Angeles, California) December 2003. Various pagings.

["Analysts with the UCLA Anderson Forecast say the worst is over for the Golden State economy. Because of ongoing sluggishness in key sectors such as manufacturing and continued caution by employers, however, there won't be anything close to normal employment growth until 2005 at the earliest... In the near term, California's job prospects are still expected to be slightly better than the nation's. The UCLA report projects that U.S. nonfarm payrolls will increase by only 0.6% next year as the economy continues to grapple with a largely jobless recovery." Los Angeles Times (December 11, 2003) C1.]

[Request #S9843]

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EDUCATION

AFFIRMATIVE ACTION

Silence at Boalt Hall: The Dismantling of Affirmative Action. By Andrea Guerrero. (University of California Press, Berkeley, California) 2003. 260 p.

["Studies have shown that our public universities -- which we all subsidize with our tax dollars -- are the most effective places to address racial inequalities.... Although Latinos are now the largest minority group... we're underrepresented in academia, business, politics, and certain professions.... The empty rhetoric of color-blind equality falls flat in the face of this reality.... If we are to achieve a true equality, we must even the playing field, employing race-conscious solutions to race-based inequities. Latina. (June 1, 2003) 102.

[Request #S9794]

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EDUCATION REFORM

Working Knowledge: Work-Based Learning and Education Reform. By Thomas R. Bailey and others, The Institute on Education and The Economy. (RoutledgeFalmer, Florence, Kentucky) 2004. 246 p.

["Based on over five years of research on high school and community college work-based learning programs across the country, this piece explores the potential for using work-based learning as part of a broad education reform strategy." Publisher's Announcement.]

[Request #S9795]

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ENVIRONMENT & NATURAL RESOURCES

BIODIVERSITY

Atlas of the Biodiversity of California. By Monica Parisi, and others, California Department of Fish and Game. (The Department, Sacramento, California) October 2003. 112 p.

["A new guide to the Golden State's plant and animal life promises to become a landmark reference for the general public and researchers alike.... It discusses the state's remarkable geography, shows how we measure biodiversity, and provides samples of the complexity and unique qualities of many California habitats.... The Atlas describes how wildlife policies and collaborative management strategies seek to minimize the negative impacts to wildlife and the natural environment." Press Release (October 6, 2003) 1.

[Request #S9844]

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HEALTH

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

Patient Safety: Achieving a New Standard for Care. By Philip Aspden and others, Committee on Data Standards for Patient Safety. (National Academy Press, Washington, DC) November 20, 2003. 400 p.

Full Text at: books.nap.edu/books/0309090776/html/R1.html#pagetop

["Doctors Advised to Keep Records Electronically, Technology Could Prevent Errors: The Institute of Medicine called for hospitals and physicians to adopt electronic record-keeping systems that would prevent tens of thousands of fatal medical errors a year and form the basis for a nationwide flow of patient information among practitioners and medical facilities." Washington Post (November 21, 2003) A2.]

[Request #S9845]

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