Subject: Studies in the News 01-34


CALIFORNIA RESEARCH BUREAU
CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY
Studies in the News


California -- One Hundred and Fifty Years Ago

November 1851 - "In November 1851, Antonio Garra, a chief of the Cupenos (a tribe near the Warner's Ranch area of San Diego County), incited his people to fight to gain their independence, (because) ... the county's first sheriff, Hungarian Count Agoston Haraszthy, the son of Councilman Charles Haraszthy, attempted, as sheriff, to collect taxes from San Diego's native population. "  The Journal of San Diego History (October 1955)  

November 1851 - "Point Loma Light -- The light was first displayed at sunset of November 15, 1851. For the next thirty-six years, it guided mariners home from the sea. One change was made when increased traffic made improvements desirable, and the fixed white light was replaced by a revolving red-and-white one, actuated by weights which fell down the center of the stair well. "  The Journal of San Diego History (October 1955)  

Contents This Week

Introductory Material CALIFORNIA READER
   New directions for California economy
CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT
   America's policy on illegal drugs
   Innovative programs reducing youth crime
   Investing in California kids
   United States crime dropping
DEMOGRAPHICS
   Salvadorans undercounted in 2000 census
ECONOMY AND SOCIETY
   Crisis on the farm
   Community development credit unions
   Lending disparities remain
   State business climate
   Justice Foundation lawsuit on long-term electricity contracts
   Internet filters
   Copyright as cultural policy
   Charitable giving survey
   Managing university-industry collaboration
   California hotel industry at 10-year low
EDUCATION
   Early learning in preschool classrooms
   Global college graduation rates
   Degree attainment patterns
   Literacy and after school programs
   Minority school achievement
ENVIRONMENT & NATURAL RESOURCES
   State clean air implementation plans
   Natural disaster mitigation
   Problems with MTBE
   Pipeline safety issues
   Water use in the Colorado River Delta
ETHNIC, RACIAL & CULTURAL DIVERSITY
   Gay and lesbian families
GENERAL GOVERNMENT
   Campaign contributions and election outcomes
   Cost of stimulus bill to states
   Spending cuts vs. tax increases
   Impact of federal tax changes
   Sales tax losses on e-commerce
   Hiring a relative
   Arts organizations face difficulties
   LAO fiscal projections through 2007
   States' fiscal outlook for FY 2002
HEALTH
   21st century health system
   Review of hospitals
   Havens for abandoned infants
   Federal aid to state Medicaid programs falling
   Medicaid and state budgets
   Children in kinship care
   Health care for farm workers
HOUSING
   Racial segregation cost
HUMAN SERVICES
   California child care options
   Investing in better infant care
   Child advocacy in public policy
   Earned income tax credits
   Families in transition
INTERNATIONAL READER
   Mexican industry and environmental cooperation
   Border security issues vs. trade
NATIONAL READER
   Military trial of suspected terrorists
   Staggering costs from terrorist attacks
TRANSPORTATION
   International registration plan
STUDIES TO COME
   Drug war heresies
   Raising minority academic achievement
   Consequences of uninsurance
   Rethinking WIC program
Introduction to Studies in the News

Studies in the News is a very current compilation of items significant to the Legislature and Governor's Office. It is created weekly by the State Library's Research Bureau to supplement the public policy debate in California’s Capitol. To help share the latest information with state policymakers, these reading lists are now being made accessible through the State Library’s website. This week's list of current articles in various public policy areas is presented below.

Service to State Employees:

  • When available, the URL for the full text of each item is provided.

  • Items in the State Library collection can be checked out to state officials and staff.

  • Access to all materials listed will be provided by the State Information Reference Center, either by e-mail to cslsirc@library.ca.gov or by calling 654-0261.

The following studies are currently on hand:

CALIFORNIA READER

California State of the State Conference 2001: Briefing Book. By Russ DeVol and others, Regional and Demographic Studies Group, Milken Institute. (The Institute, Santa Monica, California) November 6, 2001. 102 p.; Tables.

["The high-tech and entertainment sectors should help California's economy rebound from its deepest slump in years, panelists at a Milken Institute conference on the state's economic health said.... The concept of high-speed connections throughout the state, with what's perceived as infinite bandwidth, could propel California's economy beyond its current potential." Los Angeles Daily News (November 7, 2001) A1.]

[Request #S2770]

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CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT

DRUGS

Informing America's Policy on Illegal Drugs: What We Don't Know Keeps Hurting Us: Executive Summary. By the Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. (National Academy Press, Washington, DC) 2001. 360 p. [Request #S2719] Executive Summary. 12 p. [Request #S2720]

["The committee was given the charge ... to explore ways to integrate theory and findings from diverse disciplines to increase understanding of drug abuse and the operation of drug markets. The committee's general findings are presented in this final report."]

[Request #S2720]

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JUVENILE JUSTICE

Less Cost, More Safety: Guiding Lights for Reform in Juvenile Justice. By Richard A. Mendel. (American Youth Policy Forum, Washington, DC) 2001. 5 p.

Full Text at: www.aypf.org/lesscost/pages/01.pdf

["A new report shows that innovative juvenile-justice initiatives, implemented by several state and local jurisdictions, are meeting with success in reducing adolescent crime and improving public safety." (JTO Direct October 31, 2001)1.]

[Request #S2814]

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JUVENILES

California's After-School Choice: Juvenile Crime or Safe Learning Time: Report. By Fight Crime: Invest in Kids California. Fight Crime, Oakland, California. 2001. 64p.

Full Text at: www.fightcrime.org/

["After School No-Brainer: The prime time for juvenile crime is from 2 to 6 p.m.... According to the organization, there are about 440,000 students in government-funded after-school programs. But there are another 1.2 million youngsters ages 5 to 14 who need to be in them.... Fight Crime's survey found that the rate of students having to repeat grades was cut in half for those in after-school programs." Los Angeles Times (September 23, 2001) 18.]

[Request #S2772]

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STATISTICS

Uniform Crime Reports: Crime in the United States: 2000. By the Federal Bureau of Investigation. (The Bureau, Washington, DC) October 2001. Various pagings.

Full Text at: www.fbi.gov/ucr/00cius.htm

["Crime Plunges in State's Cities: Crime rates in California cities have plummeted more than in other parts of the country.... The state's best-known cities, Los Angeles, San Francisco and San Diego, all saw significant drops in their combined violent and property crime index, as did inland areas." Daily News of Los Angeles (October 29, 2001) N6.]

[Request #S2773]

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DEMOGRAPHICS

CENSUS 2000

Salvadoran American: A Profile. By David E. Hayes-Bautista and others, Center for the Study of Latino Health & Culture, University of California at Los Angeles. (The Center, Los Angeles, California) [2001.] 20 p.

["The U.S. Census has had difficulty finding the right formula to count Latinos other than those of Mexican, Cuban and Puerto Rican origin in the United States.... There is suspicion that many Latinos did not identify themselves specifically as being of Salvadoran origin, but used the residual category of 'Other Hispanic' instead. If this is the case there is likely an undercount in the 2000 census.... The data in this profile give a portrait of the Salvadoran-American community ... from many sources: the 2000 census, the 1999 Current Population Survey and the 2000 UCLA Social Attitudes Survey (for Los Angeles County only)."]

[Request #S2774]

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ECONOMY AND SOCIETY

AGRICULTURE

Crisis on the Farm: A Report. By the California Farm Bureau Federation Farm Crisis Task Force. (The Federation, Sacramento, California) 2001. 18 p.

Full Text at: www.cfbf.com/pdf/fcrisis_report.pdf

["California's farm economy is hurting.... The problems have been developing for several years, even as the state's general economy was booming.... The Task Force [was formed] to examine steps the organization can take to deal with the economic problems.... The committee highlighted several priority areas, including: energy, establishing a safety net for financially stressed commodities, trade, public awareness programs, water, taxes and regulatory reform. The committee' recommendations follow."]

[Request #S2775]

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BANKING

Community Development Credit Unions: An Emerging Player in Low Income Communities. By Charles D. Tansey, Commonwealth Capital Partners, Inc. Prepared for the Center on Urban and Metropolitan Policy. Brookings Institute and Joint Center for Housing Studies, Harvard University. (The Institute, Washington, DC) September 2001. 17 p.

Full Text at: www.brookings.edu/es/urban/capitalxchange/tansey.pdf

["The Community Development Credit Unions (CDCUs); An Emerging Player in Low Income Communities: The CDCU may be the best replicable model for providing affordable capital and financial services in low-income and very low-income areas.... So, why aren't there more CDCUs? ... [Listed] are numerous steps that can be taken to substantially expand both the reach and the delivery capacity of these financial platforms."]

[Request #S2776]

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Financial Services in Distressed Communities: Issues and Answers. By James H. Carr and others, Fannie Mae Foundation. (The Foundation, Pasadena, California) August 2001. 48 p.

Full Text at: fanniemaefoundation.org/programs/financial.PDF

[“Home loans still aren't equally distributed among different ethnic groups…. Despite the gains in minority lending, disparities remain. Last year, the approval rate for Hispanics seeking conventional loans was 64.8 percent, well below the 76.9 percent rate for whites and the 75.2 percent rate for Asians. The gap persisted even between Hispanics, whites and Asians with similar incomes.” The Orange County Register (October 7, 2001) B1.]

[Request #S2777]

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BUSINESS CLIMATE

Understanding State Business Climate. By Monica Kearns, National Conference of State Legislatures. Legisbrief. Vol. 9, No. 37. (NCSL, Denver, Colorado) October 2001. 2 p.

["Analysts recommend that states examine the geographic distribution of their economic resources and target support to the collections of industries that accompany them, rather than attempting to create new clusters from scratch. Successful high-tech clusters tend to specialize in a few products or technologies rather than an extensive variety."]

[Request #S2778]

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ELECTRIC INDUSTRY

Carboneau v. State of California, et al. Superior Court of the County of Sacramento. 01AS06848. Complaint. November 8, 2001. 23 p.

["A conservative legal-action group, the United States Justice Foundation in Escondido, filed a lawsuit to overturn $45 billion worth of long-term power contracts obtained by the state... The lawsuit argues that the contracts are illegal because of violations of contracting policy and antitrust laws." San Diego Union-Tribune (November 9, 2001) C1.]

[Request #S2813]

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INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

Internet Filters: A Public Policy Report. By Marjorie Heins and Christina Cho, Free Expression Policy Project, National Coalition Against Censorship. (The Coalition, New York, New York) October 2001. 43 p.

Full Text at: www.ncac.org/issues/internetfilters.html

["Child Online Protection Act, Child Internet Protection Act Get Days in Court; Federal Internet Laws Approach the End of the Judicial Process: Bolstering the antifiltering forces, [this publication] summarizes existing tests, studies, and papers on how filters generally either overblock or underblock sites." Library Journal (November 1, 2001) 24.]

[Request #S2779]

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INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY

Copyright as Cultural Policy. By Michael Shapiro, Center for Arts and Culture. (The Center, Washington, DC) October 2001. 15 p.

Full Text at: www.culturalpolicy.org/pubs/shapiro.pdf

["The aim of the Center is to explore a roster of cultural issues that affect the nation's well-being -- issues that should be on the horizon of policymakers, public and private, and at a national, state and local level... This issue paper provides an overview, historical analysis and legal implications of copyright law for the creative sector and cultural organizations."]

[Request #S2780]

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NOT FOR PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS

Giving and Volunteering in California . By Michael O'Neill, Institute for Nonprofit Organization Management, University of San Francisco. (The Institute, San Francisco, California) 2000. 76 p.

["Ninety percent of California households give to charitable organizations, as compared with 70% of households nationally.... Fifty percent of Californians volunteer for charitable organizations. California volunteers give 8.5 hours per week to charitable organizationsd, compared to just over 4 hours nationally." NOTE: Giving and Volunteering ... is available for 3-day loan.]

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SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

Working Together, Creating Knowledge: The University-Industry Collaboration Initiative. By The Business-Higher Education Forum. (The Forum, Washington, DC) June 11, 2001. 95 p.

Full Text at: www.acenet.edu/bookstore/pdf/working-together.pdf

["Written by leading academic, corporate and governmental research officials, the report reinforces the belief that university-industry coziness has helped the United States retain world leadership in fields such as computing, software, telecommunications and biotechnology. But as ties between the boardroom and the classroom have increased, so have concerns about potential conflicts and instances of outright scandal.... The report takes the position that the benefits of academic-industrial partnerships outweigh the dangers, provided universities avoid the abuses critics have identified."]

[Request #S2744]

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TOURISM

"California Hotels Looking at 10-Year Low." IN: Sacramento Business Journal (October 1, 2001) pp. A1+.

Full Text at: sacramento.bcentral.com/sacramento/stories/2001/10/01/daily2.html?t=printable

["The California hospitality industry has reached a 10-year low, hit by a one-two punch of a softening economy and the September 11 terrorist attacks ... according to research analyzing recent California occupancy numbers [and] room rate data ... [in] San Francisco ... Los Angeles ... San Diego ... [and] Sacramento."]

[Request #S2771]

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EDUCATION

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

Preparing the Workers of Tomorrow: A Report on Early Learning. By the Child Care Action Campaign. (The Campaign, Washington, DC) 2001. 8 p.

["Researchers have found that children's language skills can be improved through practices commonly found in quality child care and preschool classrooms. These practices help young children learn how to ask questions, request, get attention, describe, create extended narratives and explanations, and use conversation."]

[Request #S2637]

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EDUCATIONAL STATISTICS

Education At A Glance: OECD Indicators 2001 Edition. By the Center for Educational Research and Innovation, Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development. (OECD, Paris, France) 2001. 412 p.

["University Enrollments Rise in Industrial Nations: Enrollment at postsecondary institutions in leading industrial nations increased by 20 percent from 1995 to 1999.... The study found that the United States, once the global leader in college entry rates is now only at the O.E.C.D. average of 45 percent. Four countries have surpassed the United States in terms of college graduation rates: Finland, the Netherlands, New Zealand, and Britain." Chronicle of Higher Education (June 22, 2001) 40. NOTE: Education at a Glance ... is available for 3-day loan.]

[Request #S2289]

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HIGHER EDUCATION

More Than 13 Ways of Looking at Degree Attainment. By Clifford Adelman, Senior Research Analyst, Office of Educational Research and Improvement, Department of Education. (The Department, Washington, DC) 2001. 4 p.

Full Text at: www.njccc.org/images/degree.pdf

["Motivated Students Miss AP, IB Opportunities: U.S. Education Department senior researcher Clifford Adelman studied a cohort of 8,700 students and discovered those most likely to finish college were not those with the highest high school grades or test scores, but those who had taken the most difficult courses in high school." Washington Post (October 30, 2001) 1.]

[Request #S2781]

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LITERACY

"Making Afterschool Count: Literacy and Afterschool: A Perfect Fit [Issue Theme]." By Andrea Warren and others, The Charles Stewart Mott Foundation. IN: Communities and Schools Working Together, vol. 4, no. 1 (September 2001) pp. 1-16.

Full Text at: www.mott.org/publications/pdf/MAFC4-1.pdf

["That afterschool programs improve reading is supported by several major studies.... In 1998, the foundation entered into an unusual private-public partnership with the U.S. Department of Education to provide grants for training, leadership development ... to support the 21st Century Community Learning Centers Initiative.... To date, there have been more than 900 federal grants made to support programs in more than 3,600 schools nationwide. That number is expected to grow to more than 7,000 in 2001."]

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STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT

March Toward Excellence: School Success and Minority Student Achievement in Department of Defense Schools. By Claire Smrekar and others, Peabody Center for Education Policy. (The Center, Nashville, Tennessee) 2001. 89 p.

Full Text at: www.negp.gov/reports/DoDFinal921.pdf

["The study finds that the impressive success of Department of Defense schools in achieving high academic standards rests on a combination of in-school and out-of-school factors. The authors identify important policy implications for state and local education policymakers. They make policy recommendations based on their findings."]

[Request #S2783]

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ENVIRONMENT & NATURAL RESOURCES

AIR QUALITY

Clean Air Policy: A Primer on State Implementation Plans. By Christie Rewey, National Conference of State Legislatures. State Legislative Report. Vol. 26, No. 9. (NCSL, Denver, Colorado) September 2001. 19 p.

["State Implementation Plans (SIPs)... outline how the state plans to meet or maintain conformity to federal air quality requirements.... It is helpful for state legislators to have an understanding of the origins, intentions and contents of these documents, which form a critical component of a state's air quality plans and frequently can have implications for growth and economic activity. Many states also require state legislative involvement in the design and finalization of SIPs."]

[Request #S2784]

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DISASTER RESPONSE

Natural Disaster Response. By Cheryl Runyon, National Conference of State Legislatures. State Legislative Report. Vol. 26, No. 11. October 2001.

["This report addresses protecting public health and welfare through a combination of strong building codes and active enforcement as a means of disaster mitigation.... The Basic Community Preparedness Disaster Mitigation Checklist outlines initial steps that policymakers might want to consider as they develop their responses to mitigate natural disasters."]

[Request #S2785]

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MTBE

The Problem With Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether. By Laurie Holmes, National Conference of State Legislatures. NCSL Legisbrief. Vol. 9, No. 48. (NCSL, Denver, Colorado) November/December 2001. 2 p.

["MTBE has contaminated ground and drinking water through leaks in underground storage tanks.... Sixteen states have enacted laws to either phase out MTBE or opt out of the federal RFG program.... States and Congress are looking to the EPA to help resolve the complications of the mandate."]

[Request #S2786]

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PIPELINE SPILLS

Pipeline Safety. By Cheryl Runyon and Eileen Doherty, National Conference of State Legislatures. NCSL Legisbrief. Vol. 9, No. 44. November/December 2001. 2 p.

["Nearly 2 million miles of natural gas and hazardous liquid pipelines weave through America. Pipeline spills can contaminate drinking water and crops, cause expensive property damage, kill fish, and create explosions and fires.... Several state legislatures considered bills related to pipeline safety during their 2001 sessions."]

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WATER RESOURCES

Missing Water: The Uses and Flows of Water in the Colorado River Delta Region. By Michael J. Cohen and Christine Henges-Jeck, Pacific Institute for Studies in Development, Environment, and Security. (The Institute, Oakland, California) September 2001. 44p.

Full Text at: www.pacinst.org/missing_water_report_web.pdf

["This study looked at the uses of water in three different sectors -- agriculutral, urban and natural -- as a means of distinguishing between different uses of water in the delta region.... Urban water use accounted for about 2% of total regional water consumption."]

[Request #S2788]

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ETHNIC, RACIAL & CULTURAL DIVERSITY

GAYS & LESBIANS

Challenges Facing Gay and Lesbian Families: The Pros and Cons of Civil Union: AB 1338 (Koretz): An Informational Hearing. Briefing Papers. By the Assembly on the Judiciary, California Legislature. (The Committee, Sacramento, California) October 24, 2001. Various pagings.

[Includes: "A Primer on Civil Unions;" "Who Can Marry in California?" "Use of Private Contractual Agreements to Provide Rights to Same-Sex Couples;" "Congressional Action: The Defense of Marriage Act - No Recognition of Same-Sex Marriages;" "Proposition 22: California's Defense of Marriage Act;" "What Are Other States Doing?" "What Are Other Countries Doing?" "The California Family Protection Act of 2001;" and "The Vermont Guide to Civil Unions."]

[Request #S2789]

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GENERAL GOVERNMENT

CAMPAIGN FINANCE

Campaign Contributions, Policy Decisions, and Election Outcomes: A Study of the Effects of Campaign Finance Reform. By Christopher Magee, Jerome Levy Economics Institute of Bard College. Public Policy Brief No. 64. 2001. (The Institute, Annandale-on-Hudson, New York) 2001. 48 p.

Full Text at: www.levy.org/docs/ppb/ppb64.pdf

["In this policy brief, Christopher Magee examines the link between campaign donations and legislator's actions.... Magee's results suggest that political action committees donate campaign funds in order to affect the outcome of the election by increasing the challengers' chances of winning. Campaign contributions received by challengers have a large impact on the election outcome but do not seem to affect the challengers' policy stances."]

[Request #S2790]

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GOVERNMENT FINANCE

How Much Revenue Will the Corporate Tax Reductions in the House Stimulus Bill and Senator Baucus’ Stimulus Package Cost Each State? By Iris J. Lav and Nick Johnson, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. (The Center, Washington, DC) October 25, 2001. 3 p.

Full Text at: www.cbpp.org/10-25-01sfp.pdf

[The research group focused its analysis on the effects of one key component of the bills -- the corporate expensing and depreciation rules -- and experts say the overall cost to state coffers could be even larger when other tax changes are factored in." Star Tribune (October 31, 2001) 6B.]

[Request #S2791]

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Budget Cuts vs. Tax Increases at the State Level: Is One More Counter-Productive Than the Other During a Recession? By Peter Orszag and Joseph Stiglitz, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. (The Center, Washington, DC) October 31, 2001. 3 p.

Full Text at: www.cbpp.org/10-30-01sfp.pdf

["Some state policy-makers apparently believe that from a macroeconomic perspective, reducing spending is preferable to raising taxes.... Economic analysis suggests that tax increases would not be more harmful to the economy than spending reductions.... Some of the tax increase would result in reduced saving rather than reduced consumption."]

[Request #S2792]

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INCOME TAXES

State Income Taxes: Conforming to the Federal Code. By Alysoun McLaughlin, National Conference of State Legislatures. NCSL Legisbrief. Vol. 9, No. 43. (NCSL, Denver, Colorado) November/December 2001. 2 p.

["Most states calculate state income taxes based on a federal starting point. Every state will feel the effects of federal income tax reduction.... Passage of the federal tax cut prompted several states to pass laws to lessen its impact on state tax receipts."]

[Request #S2793]

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INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

State and Local Sales Tax Revenue Losses from E-Commerce: Updated Estimates. By Donal Bruce and William F. Fox, Center for Business and Economic Research, University of Tennessee. (The Center, Knoxville, Tennessee) September 2001. 19 p.

Full Text at: cber.bus.utk.edu/ecomm/ecom0901.pdf

["A new study said state revenue losses this year due to missed sales taxes on e-commerce were significantly higher than previously estimated and would continue to climb.... The study said states would lose $13.3 billion in revenue this year, 41% more than an earlier U. of Tenn. study had predicted.... The difference, co-author Donald Bruce said, is the rise in business-to-business commerce." Washington Internet Daily (October 3, 2001) 1.]

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LEGISLATIVE ETHICS

To Hire (Or Not To Hire) A Relative. By Ginger Sampson, National Conference of State Legislatures. NCSL Legisbrief. Vol. 9, No. 47. November/December 2001. 2 p.

["Nineteen state legislatures prohibit a legislator from hiring a relative.... Half the states with restrictions allow a legislator's relative to be employed in the other chamber or by another legislator in the same chamber.... While the ethics of nepotism are debatable, the number of legislatures enacting these self-imposed limitations is increasing."]

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NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS

California Arts Organizations: How Are They Affected by Rent and Labor Costs? By Carol Silverman. College of Professional Studies, Institute for Nonprofit Organization Management, University of San Francisco. Working Paper No. 23. (The Institute, San Francisco, California) 2001. 19 p.

["A Mail survey was conducted of 1000 arts and cultural organizations in 29 counties in California.... It asked about difficulties the organizations have experienced because of rental increases, in hiring and retaining staff.... Bay Area organizations were more likely to see their rents increase compared to the rest of the state.... Thirty percent of organizations outside the Bay Area had no difficulties in hiring because of pay, while only 12.4 percent of Bay Area organizations reported no difficulty."]

[Request #S2796]

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STATE BUDGET

California's Fiscal Outlook: LAO Projections, 2001-02 Through 2006-07. By Elizabeth G. Hill, Legislative Analyst's Office. (The Office, Sacramento, California) November 2001. 36 p.

Full Text at: http://http://www.lao.ca.gov/2001/fisc_outlook/Fiscal_Outlook_2001.pdf

["California's state government faces its steepest decline in state revenues since World War II, the state's legislative analyst said.... (Legislative Analyst Elizabeth) Hill predicts that revenue shortages, estimated at 15 percent short during the next two budget years, could linger until 2007. But she also predicted the recession could lift next spring. If it lasts until autumn, she said, the state's revenue problem may worsen by up to $4 billion." Sacramento Bee (November 14, 2001) online.]

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STATE FINANCES

State Fiscal Outlook for FY 2002: October Update. By Corina Eckl and Arturo Perez, National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL, Denver, Colorado) October 31, 2001. 24 p.; Appendices.

["States Face Harshest Fiscal Conditions in a Decade: A new report finds revenues down, cuts coming and strains on services growing. A 50-state survey ... confirms the latest economic worries: state revenues are down, budget cuts are needed, and strains on government services are worsening.... 'As more collection figures become available -- especially post-September 11 data -- the revenue picture is expected to get worse,' the report said." Sacramento Bee (November 2, 2001) A9.]

[Request #S2797]

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HEALTH

HEALTH CARE REFORM

Crossing the Quality Chasm: A New Health System for the 21st Century. By the Committee on Quality of Health Care in America, Institute of Medicine. (National Academy Press, Washington, DC. 2001) 337 p.

Full Text at: www.nap.edu/books/0309072808/html/

["The report ... [which] was met with a unified front from physician groups ... says key things need to happen if health care quality is to substantially improve. It must become more patient centered, efforts should be focused on treating chronic conditions and technology must play a much more significant role in health care communications and delivery." American Medical News (March 19, 2001) 1.]

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HOSPITALS

Results from the Patients' Evaluation of Performance (PEP-C) Survey: Executive Summary. By the California Institute for Health Systems Performance and the California Health Care Foundation. (The Institute, Oakland, California). 2001. 29 p.

["Hospitals Get Mixed Reviews: Patients in California hospitals usually receive needed pain medication, do not experience long waits and are treated with respect and care before surgery.... But the survey also found that many hospitals fail to sufficiently educate patients about medication or resuming day-to-day activities once they go home.... Though it may not be entirely representative of care in California hospitals, the survey is the best overall picture for consumers so far. Slightly less than a third of hospitals--which house 42% of the licensed beds in the state--responded to the survey." Los Angeles Times (August 29, 2001) B1.]

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INFANTS

Safe Havens for Abandoned Infants. By Nina Williams-Mbengue, National Conference of State Legislatures. State Legislative Report. Vol. 26, No. 8. (NCSL, Denver, Colorado) September 2001. 13 p.

["This report examines what is known about infant abandonment, provides an overview of key aspects of the legislation, describes state experience with the new laws and discusses some policy implications for lawmakers. Thirty-five states now have some type of safe haven legislation."]

[Request #S2798]

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MEDICAID

Federal Aid to State Medicaid Programs is Falling While the Economy Weakens. By Leighton Ku and Edwin Park, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. (The Center, Washington, DC) October 26, 2001. 6 p.

Full Text at: www.cbpp.org/10-11-01health.pdf

["The proportion of Medicaid costs that the federal government bears is declining in more than half the states in fiscal year 2002.... The Medicaid matching rate is dropping for 29 states because their economies improved in the late 1990s.... The reductions ... will exacerbate states' weakening fiscal status and increase the likelihood that they will act in the middle of a downturn to scale back their Medicaid programs."]

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Medicaid and State Budgets: An October 2001 Update. By the Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured, Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. (The Foundation, Menlo Park, California) October 2001. 9 p.

Full Text at: www.kff.org/content/2001/4019/4019.pdf

["Many states are considering some cuts to Medicaid this year and predict further cuts next year. A survey of 20 states by the Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured found that governors have directed Medicaid officials in more than half the states surveyed to prepare cost-saving proposals." Pittsburgh Post (October 30, 2001) A6.]

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Healthy Ties: Ensuring Health Coverage for Children Raised by Grandparents and Other Relatives. A look at Medicaid and CHIP Enrollment in the States. By Mary K. Bissell and MaryLee Allen. (Children's Defense Fund, Oakland, California) 2001. Various pagings.

Full Text at: www.childrensdefensefund.org/pdf/healthyties_fullreport.pdf

["This report focuses on children raised by kinship caregivers, recognizing that it is a growing population with a range of special physical and mental health needs. It is also a growing population of children that is often overlooked, in some cases inadvertantly, in Medicaid and CHIP policy development, implementation, and outreach."]

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MIGRANT & SEASONAL LABOR

Access to Health Care for California's Hired Farm Workers: A Baseline Report. By Don Villarejo, California Institute for Rural Studies, and others. Prepared for the California Program on Access to Care. (California Policy Research Center, University of California, Berkely, California) October 2001. 60 p.

Full Text at: www.ucop.edu/cprc/fwaccess.pdf

["Despite the billions of dollars in crops they harvest every year, immigrant farm workers from Mexico would be healthier in the long term if they stayed south of the border..."As we see it, the lifestyle of farm workers, which is driven by work and poverty, translates into a deterioration of their health status due to poor access to health care, a failure of preventive education and their own diets," said Don Villarejo, principal researcher." Sacramento Bee (October 29, 2001) A1.]

[Request #S2814]

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HOUSING

DISCRIMINATION

The "Segregation Tax": The Cost of Racial Segregation to Black Homeowners. By David Rusk. (The Brookings Institution, Washington DC) October 2001. 14 p.

Full Text at: www.brookings.edu/es/urban/publications/rusk.pdf

["Gap in Home Values Studied; Black Owners' Houses Worth 30% Less Than Whites' in Region: The gap in the value of homes owned by blacks and whites in the Baltimore region is among the greatest of any in the country's 100 largest metropolitan areas, a new study shows.... The study says the variations were the result of patterns of racial discrimination." Baltimore Sun (November 1, 2001) 1B.]

[Request #S2802]

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HUMAN SERVICES

CHILD CARE

Broadening the Context: Background for Discussion of California Child Care Options. By Sujara Branch and others, Child Care Law Center. (The Center, San Francisco) 2001. 66 p.

Full Text at: www.childcarelaw.org/broadening/broadening.htm

["This report explores the current subsidized child care system and offers an initial response to some of the options presented in the Governor's Administrative Review.... While the report responds to the options presented in the Administrative Review, we hope it will also be a useful resource as advocates and policy makers develop new options."]

[Request #S]

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Investing in Better Care for Infants and Toddlers: The Next Frontier for School Readiness. By Joan Lombardi and Julie Poppe, National Conference of State Legislatures. State Legislative Report. Vol. 26, No. 10. (NCSL, Denver, Colorado) October 2001. 15 p.

["New funding increases for early childhood services ... provide important opportunities for states to improve and expand supports for families with children under 3. This policy brief describes a range of state activities going on across the country that state legislators can consider to improve the quality of services for our youngest children."]

[Request #S2803]

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CHILDREN

Who Speaks for America's Children? The Role of Child Advocates in Public Policy. Edited by Carol J. De Vita and Rachel Mosher-Williams, The Urban Institute. (Urban Institute Press, Washington, DC) August, 2001. 236 p.

["Urban Institute Book Examines Promise, Problems of Child Advocacy; Offers Ways to Increase Impact on Policy Process: Leading experts on children's health policy, education policy, community organizing and the nonprofit sector shed new light on how advocacy for children is conducted and the ways in which it influences policymaking on the federal, state and local levels." AScribe Newswire (September 7, 2001) 1. NOTE: Who Speaks ... is available for 3-day loan.]

[Request #S2462]

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EARNED INCOME TAX CREDITS

Earned Income Tax Credits By Lee Posey and Trinity Tomsic, National Conference of State Legislatures. NCSL Legisbrief. Vol. 9, No. 46. (NCSL, Denver, Colorado) November/December 2001. 2 p.

["A growing number of states are developing their own earned income tax credits.... Supporters of the credit believe it complements welfare reform and helps fight poverty.... Last year, three states enacted new credits and five states expanded existing credits."]

[Request #S2804]

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FAMILIES

Families in Transition: Serving Families with Multiple Barriers to Self-Sufficiency. By Deanna Goldsmith and Rebecca London, Berkeley Policy Associates. (The Associates, Oakland, California) 2001. 14 p.

Full Text at: www.bpacal.com/expertise/PolicyBrief.pdf

["This case study provides an in-depth description of the Families in Transition (FIT) model for serving hard-to-serve families and the outcomes FIT participants have achieved. The study utilizes data from two main sources: qualitative data from interviews with program staff and clients; and date from FIT's client database and tracking system."]

[Request #S2805]

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INTERNATIONAL READER

Is NACED a Model Trade and Environment Institution? Lessons from Mexican Industry. By Kevin P. Gallagher, Global Development and Environment Institute, Tufts University. GDAE Working Paper No. 01-08. (The Institute, Medford, Massachusetts) October 2001. 20 p.

Full Text at: ase.tufts.edu/gdae/downloads/WorkingPapers/nacec.pdf

["This paper evaluates the extent to which the National Commission for Environmental Cooperation (NACEC) serves as a model for more effective trade and environmental institutions by examining the institution's role in abating industrial pollution in Mexico. The environmental costs of trade-led economic growth in Mexico have remained high in the post-NAFTA period."]

[Request #S2806]

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Border Issues Thrust To Fore: Security vs. Trade. By Jason White, Stateline.org. (Stateline.org, Washington, DC) October 23, 2001. 3 p.

Full Text at: www1.stateline.org/story.do?storyId=204093

["In an effort to reduce the threat of terrorists slipping into the country, immigration and Customs officials have tightened the nation's northern and southern borders, prompting local and state officials to call for increased border staffing to ease the flow of goods and people. At stake is the economic health of states, regions and industries dependent on open borders for survival."]

[Request #S2807]

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NATIONAL READER

NATIONAL READER

Military Order: Detention, Treatment, and Trial of Certain Non-Citizens in the War Against Terrorism. By George W. Bush, President. (Office of the Press Secretary, Washington, DC) November 13, 2001. 5 p.

Full Text at: http://http://www.whitehouse.gov/news/releases/2001/11/20011113-27.html

["President Bush signed an order allowing special military tribunals to try foreigners charged with terrorism.... At the same time, the Justice Department has asked law enforcement authorities across the country to pick up and question 5,000 men, most from Middle Eastern countries, who entered the country legally in the last two years.... The people being sought are not believed to be terrorism suspects, and they will not be placed under arrest, an official said. The interviews are intended to be voluntary." New York Times (November 14, 2001) A1.]

[Request #S2816]

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"Assessing the Costs of Terrorism: September 11, 2001." By Peter Navarro, Milken Institute. IN: Milken Institute Review, Fourth Quarter (November 2001) pp. 16-31.

Full Text at: www.milkeninstitute.com/poe.cfm?point=review

["In the report, Navarro warned government leaders to be cautious in their fiscal and monetary policies.... The report measured the costs of the attacks in such areas as property damage, increased airline security, lost economic output, subsequent bailouts of the airlines and reduced tax revenues. Property damage will exceed $10 billion and, in the days immediately following the attacks, $6.4 billion was lost in advertising, airline and hotel revenues, the report said." Associated Press State & Local Wire (November 8, 2001) 1.]

[Request #S2817]

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TRANSPORTATION

TRUCKING INDUSTRY

Interstate Agreements and Commercial Vehicle Registration: The IRP Case Study. By Matt Sundeen and Irene Taylor Kawanabe, National Conference of State Legislatures. (NCSL, Denver, Colorado) October 2001. 49 p.

["The International Registration Plan (IRP) is an agreement between the 48 contiguous states, the District of Columbia and 10 Canadian provinces that facilitates cooperation regarding the registration of commercial vehicles.... This report examines the legal relationship established by the IRP and the consequences of federal legislation on the agreement.... To clarify issues examined by this report, four broad recommendations are made."]

[Request #S2808]

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STUDIES TO COME
[The following studies, reports, and documents have been ordered or requested, but have not yet arrived. Requests may be placed, and copies will be provided when the material arrives.]

CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT

DRUGS

Drug War Heresies: An Agnostic Look at the Legalization Debate. By Robert J. McCann, University of California, Berkeley and Peter Reuter, University of Maryland. (Cambridge University Press, New York, New York) 2001. 464 p.

["In a major new book, Robert MacCoun, who teaches law and public policy at UC Berkeley, and Peter Reuter of the University of Maryland point out that depenalizing is not the same as legalization. It simply can mean far more discretion in enforcement, as the justice system already does on crimes such as prostitution and gambling. Where such policies are wisely pursued, McCoun's and Reuter's voluminous data show no significant increase in use." Sacramento Bee (November 7, 2001) B7. NOTE: Drug War Heresies ... will be available for three day loan.]

[Request #S2809]

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EDUCATION

ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT

Raising Minority Academic Achievement: A Compendium of Education Programs and Practices. By Donna James and others, American Youth Policy Forum. (The Forum, Washington DC) 2001.

["The ... Compendium ... is the culmination of a 22-month effort to identify, summarize and analyze evaluations of school and youth programs that show gains for minority youth across a broad range of acacemic achievement indicators from early childhood though advanced postsecondary study....The report also aims to provide information that can be used to evaluate, design, implement and advocate practices effective in raising minority academic achievement."]

[Request #S2810]

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HEALTH

UNINSURED

Coverage Matters: Insurance and Health Care. By the Committee on Consequences on Uninsurance, Institute of Medicine. (National Academy Press, Washington, DC) October 2001. 169 p.; Appendices.

["According to the report, 80 percent of those uninsured are from working families, immigrants make up only a small percentage of the total, and the lack of insurance can compromise a person's health. The report is the first of a series of six reports the group will release during the next two years to find out who is uninsured and why, and how the problem can be solved." San Francisco Chronicle (October 12 2001. B1. NOTE: Coverage Matters ... will be available for three day loan.]

[Request #S2801]

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HUMAN SERVICES

WOMEN, INFANTS AND CHILDREN PROGRAM

Rethinking WIC: An Evaluation of the Women, Infants, and Children Program. By Douglas J. Besharov and Peter Germanis. (American Enterprise Institute Press, Washington, DC) 2000.

["In this book [the authors] review research evaluating WIC's effectiveness and conlude that the program's overall benefits are modest at best. However, instead of recommending that WIC be abandoned or cut, [they] call for a sustained effort it make it more effective. The volume contains a series of recommended policy and programmatic changes and concludes with comments from five leading experts on the program." AEI Book Summary (October 2001) 1.]

[Request #S2812]

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