Subject: Studies in the News 02-15 (March 5, 2002)


CALIFORNIA RESEARCH BUREAU
CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY
Studies in the News


California -- One Hundred and Fifty Years Ago

1852 - "In 1852, hydraulic mining began at American Hill just north of Nevada City and at Yankee Jims in Placer County. By 1852, California's annual gold production reached a then all-time high of $81 milion."  http://ceres.ca.gov/ceres/calweb/geology/goldrush.  

1852 - "Wells Fargo has been in the banking business since 1852. Henry Wells (left photo) and William G. Fargo (right photo), two eastern businessmen, who helped form the American Express in 1850, formed a new express and banking company on March 18, 1852. Wells Fargo insisted that every customer was to be treated with respect, no matter how large or small their account, regardless of age, sex or color. "  Casino News (January 24, 1996)  

Contents This Week

Introductory Material CALIFORNIA READER
   Fewer traveling to Bay Area
   Economic decline tied to tourism
CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT
   Ruling on felons and profits
   Fighting crime with information
   State sentencing and corrections policy
   Reducing spending for corrections
ECONOMY AND SOCIETY
   Tax increase favored for the arts
   Bringing households into the banking system
   Closing and reuse of a naval shipyard
   Business vitality and development capacity
   Urban issues
EDUCATION
   Education related legislation 2001
   Inflating grades for coursework
   Rewarding university faculty
   Bridging the digital divide
   Meeting accountability and assessment requirements
   Commercial interests in high-stakes testing
ENVIRONMENT & NATURAL RESOURCES
   Recommendations for energy security
   U.S. computer trash dumped in Asia.
   MTBE phase out in California
   Environmental protection efforts
   States' renewable energy solutions
ETHNIC, RACIAL & CULTURAL DIVERSITY
   Hispanics and the recession
GENERAL GOVERNMENT
   "Pay to Play" politics examined
   Campaign finance reform in Los Angeles
   Revitalizing our nation's election system
   States' costs for ensuring security
   Public health emergencies
   Guide to special districts
HEALTH
   Active minds help deter Alzheimer's
   Millions of children newly covered by states
   Out-of-pocket expenses for Medicare beneficiaries
   Metabolic syndrome among U.S. adults
   Pay for performance initiative
   Untreated sexually transmitted diseases
HUMAN SERVICES
   Charitable choice issues
   Child support reforms
   Mayors' report on hunger and homelessness
   Strategies to aid low-income
   Children and welfare reform
INTERNATIONAL READER
   Anti-globalization movement changes
   For-profit distance education overseas
   Competing visions for the hemisphere
TRANSPORTATION
   State highway funds
   Aviation security
STUDIES TO COME
   Smart-growth legislative guidebook
   Turnout in municipal elections
   Making government work
   2000 election and immigrant voters
   Health care technology forecast
   World Bank and air pollution
Introduction to Studies in the News

Studies in the News is a very current compilation of items significant to the Legislature and Governor's Office. It is created weekly by the State Library's Research Bureau to supplement the public policy debate in California’s Capitol. To help share the latest information with state policymakers, these reading lists are now being made accessible through the State Library’s website. This week's list of current articles in various public policy areas is presented below.

Service to State Employees:

  • When available, the URL for the full text of each item is provided.

  • Items in the State Library collection can be checked out to state officials and staff.

  • Access to all materials listed will be provided by the State Information Reference Center, either by e-mail to cslsirc@library.ca.gov or by calling 654-0261.

The following studies are currently on hand:

CALIFORNIA READER

Air Transport and the Bay Area Economy: Crisis in Air Travel: Weathering the Downturn. By R. Sean Randolph and Niels Erich, Bay Area Economic Forum, A Partnership of the Association of Bay Area Governments and the Bay Area Council. (The Forum, San Francisco) January 2002. 27 p.

Full Text at: www.bayeconfor.org/pdf/aircrisis.pdf

["Plunge in Air Travel Hurts Local Economy: San Mateo County loses 5,000 jobs after September 11.... The study is the first reckoning of what the terrorist attacks have cost the region's air travel and tourism-heavy economy, and the news is bleak, especially for the Peninsula.... San Francisco International Airport is the epicenter of the downturn because of its long-haul domestic and international flights.... Traffic remains off 20 to 25 percent, and officials expect $100 million in losses this year." Oakland Tribune (February 19, 2002) 1.]

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National Lodging Forecast: 2002. By Ernst & Young. (Ernst & Young, New York, New York) February 2002. 42 p.

["Bay Area Tourism Reeling From A Double Whammy: The Bay Area will feel the sting of the post-September 11 tourism slump longer than any major national destination other than Manhattan and should not expect its visitor numbers to return to normal for a year to 18 months, according to a new study.... Of 25 markets we cover, the Bay Area ranks near the bottom." Los Angeles Times (February 10, 2002) 12.]

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CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT

FELONS

Keenan v. Superior Court of Los Angeles County. California Supreme Court. S080284. February 21, 2002. Various pagings.

["In a broad defense of free speech rights, a unanimous California Supreme Court struck down a state law requiring felons to turn over profits from books and movies to their victims. Although not binding on other states, the decision is expected to have a national effect. California is one of more than 40 states with "Son of Sam" laws, a popular approach to victims' rights intended to prevent criminals from cashing in on their notoriety....A spokeswoman for state Attorney General Bill Lockyer said he will pursue a more narrowly focused law that will withstand constitutional scrutiny." San Francisco Chronicle (February 22, 2002) A1.]

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INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

"Fighting Crime with Information." By Blake Harrison. IN: State Legislatures (January 2002) pp. 28-30.

["Improved safety comes with integrating criminal justice information systems, but the process isn't easy. And it takes money.... In at least 31 states, integration efforts are under way to pull this information together. Yet to date, none are fully operational."]

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PRISONS

State Sentencing and Corrections Policy in an Era of Fiscal Restraint. By Ryan S. King and Marc Mauer, The Sentencing Project. (The Project, Washington DC) February 2002. 20 p.

Full Text at: www.sentencingproject.org/news/rkmm-fnl.pdf

["Sentence Reforms Found Effective: After three decades of 'get tough' prison policies in the U.S., a growing number of states have adopted sentencing reforms as alternatives to incarceration.... In its analysis ... the Project found that in the last eighteen months, four states have scaled back mandatory sentencing laws, five states have expanded the role of drug treatment as an alternative to prison and seven states have passed other types of legislation to ease prison crowding." Los Angeles Times (February 7,2002) A18.]

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Cutting Correctly: New Prison Policies for Times of Fiscal Crisis. By Judith Greene and Vincent Schiraldi, Justice Policy Institute. (The Institute, Washington, DC) February 2002. 38 p.

Full Text at: www.cjcj.org/cutting/cutting_main.html

["Today, federal, state and county expenditures total nearly $40 billion annually to lock up 2 million prisoners. The study concluded that California's Proposition 36 drug diversion program has helped keep non- violent offenders out of prison. The institute's report say the state has not done as much as many others to reduce costs." Los Angeles Times (February 7, 2002) 1.]

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ECONOMY AND SOCIETY

ARTS & CULTURE

Public Opinion Survey 2001. By California Arts Council. (The Council, Sacramento, California) 2001. 31 p.

Full Text at: www.cac.ca.gov/load/Public_Opinion_Survey.pdf

[“More than 78 percent of Californians would be willing to spend $5 apiece in additional state taxes to fund the arts, according to the state’s first major survey of public opinion about the arts.” Sacramento Bee (December 19, 2001) E1.]

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BANKING

Bringing Unbanked Households into the Banking System. By John P. Caskey, Professor of Economics, Swarthmore College. Prepared for the Brookings Institution Center on Urban and Metropolitan Policy. (The Center, Washington, DC) January 2002. 11 p.

Full Text at: www.brookings.edu/es/urban/capitalxchange/caskey.pdf

["This paper presents a strategy that banks can use to help 'unbanked' households -- those who do not have accounts at deposit institutions -- to join the mainstream financial system. The primary purpose of the strategy is to help those households build savings and improve their credit-risk profiles in order to lower their cost of payment services."]

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DEFENSE CUTS & CONVERSIONS

The Closing and Reuse of the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard. By Ron Hess and others, Rand National Defense Research Institute. Prepared for the United States Navy. MR-1364-NAVY. (RAND, Santa Monica, California) 2001. 114 p.

Full Text at: www.rand.org/publications/MR/MR1364.pref.pdf

["This report provides a chronological history of the closing and reuse of the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard with specific data on the costs and workforce issues of closing, maintaining in a dormant state, and reestablishing shipbuilding activities at the shipyard.... This document should be of interest to policymakers and planners who must face decisions concerning the closing and reuse of shipbuilding facilities." NOTE: The Closing ... is available for 3-day loan.]

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ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

Development Report Card for the States 2001. By the Corporation for Enterprise Development. (The Corporation, Washington, DC) November 2001. Various pagings.

Full Text at: 209.183.252.135

["The Development Report Card's indexes capture important developments and trends. The grades provide a snapshot of how states have fared in the areas of Performance, Business Vitality, and Development Capacity. Individual State Report Cards, and the data behind the grades and rankings provide insight into the marks each state received."]

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URBAN AREAS

Urban Issues: Selections from The CQ Researcher. (CQ Press, Washington, DC) 2001. 239 p.

[Includes: "Race, Class and Ethnicity;" "Education;" "Crime and Law Enforcement;" "Land Use and Urban Development;" and "Affordable Housing."

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EDUCATION

CALIFORNIA

Summary of Education-Related Legislation 2001. By the Governmental Relations Unit, Los Angeles County Office of Education. (The Office, Los Angeles, California) October 2001. 107 p.

["During the year 2001, the Legislature passed and Governor Davis signed many important pieces of legislation, which will impact education throughout California for many years to come. This booklet is a summary of that legislation."]

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HIGHER EDUCATION

Evaluation and the Academy: Are We Doing the Right Thing? Grade Inflation and Letters of Recommendation. By Henry Rosovsky and Matthew Hartley, American Academy of Arts & Sciences. (The Academy, Cambridge, Massachusetts) 2002. 26 p.

Full Text at: www.amacad.org/publications/occasional.htm

["A Call for an End to Grade Inflation: Concerns about grade inflation, defined as an upward shift in the grade-point average without a corresponding increase in student achievement, are not new. The report cites evidence from national studies beginning as early as 1960.... They say schools should establish tangible and consistent standards, formulate alternative grading systems and create a standard distribution curve in each class as a yardstick." USA Today (February 5, 2002) 1.]

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Collegial Models for Enhancing the Performance of University Professors. By Rodney A. Clifton and Hymie Rubenstein, The Fraser Institute. (The Institute, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada) February 2002. 24 p.

Full Text at: www.fraserinstitute.ca/admin/books/files/CollegialModels.pdf

["This paper presents a new perspective for evaluating and differentially rewarding teaching performance and scholarly output based on a system that has proven to be successful in many other fields.... Specifically, we propose that rewards should be based on clearly defined objectives of good teaching and good scholarship and that meaningful incentives should be used so that departmental faculty members work together to achieve those objectives."]

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INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

Great Expectations: Leveraging America’s Investment in Educational Technology: The E-Rate at Five, Enhancing Policymaking and New Evaluation Models. Edited by Norris Dickard, Communications Policy Program, Benton Foundation and the Center for Children and Technology, Education Development Center, Inc. (The Foundation, Washington, DC) December 2001. 60 p.

Full Text at: www.benton.org/e-rate/greatexpectations.pdf

["As the report shows, great progress has been made in bridging the digital divide, and the E-Rate has been a critical source of building materials for this bridge.... To support the unique opportunities technology offers to improve teaching and learning ... this report highlights a number of areas where work is needed and provides useful tools and suggestions for maximizing this important investment."]

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SCHOOL REFORM

No State Left Behind: The Challenges and Opportunities of ESEA 2001. By Mary Fulton and others, Education Commission of the States (The Commission, Denver, Colorado) February 2002. 58 p.

Full Text at: www.ecs.org/clearinghouse/32/37/3237.pdf

["This report provides a summary of the major provisions and requirements of the new law; information about the timelines and funding levels; an updated look at states' readiness to implement various provisions of the new law; [and] a set of 'self-assessment' questions for policymakers to consider as they make decisions about how to move forward."]

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STANDARDIZED TESTING

Testing… Testing…. One, Two, Three: The Commercial Side of the Standardized Testing Boom. By May Gluckman. IN: Dollars & Sense, no. 239 (January/February 2002) 2 p. [online.]

Full Text at: www.dollarsandsense.org/2002/gluckman0102.htm

["In recent years, the creation and scoring of K-12 tests has become big business. Between 1955 and 1970, sales of standardized tests grew from $5 million to $25 million. Since then sales have increased, reaching $130 million in 1990 and jumping to $234 million in 2000.... At a minimum, the industry should be under much closer scrutiny than it is today. Better yet, the United States needs to revisit the business model that places high-stakes standardized testing at the center of education reform."]

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ENVIRONMENT & NATURAL RESOURCES

ENERGY

Energy Security: Solutions to Protect America's Power Supply and Reduce Oil Dependence. By the Union of Concerned Scientists. (The Union, Cambridge, MA) January 2002. 29 p.

Full Text at: www.ucsusa.org/publications/EnergySecurity.pdf

["The report analyzes the vulnerability of U.S. power plants, transmission hubs, pipelines and nuclear power plants, predicting that a well-placed attack could cut power or contaminate land for tens of thousands of people. The report recommends that Congress take action for a 'safer, cheaper, and cleaner future,' including changes in fuel economy standards, incentives for next-generation vehicles and energy efficiency standards." California Policy Forum NewsWire (February 26, 2002) 1. ]

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HAZARDOUS WASTE

Exporting Harm: The High-Tech Trashing of Asia. Jim Puckett, Basel Action Network, and others. (Silicon Valley Toxics Coalition, San Jose, California) February 25, 2002. 51 p.

Full Text at: www.svtc.org/cleancc/pubs/technotrash_v3.pdf

["Old computer parts hauled into California's recycling centers are more likely to wind up as toxic trash in Asia's waterways than reused high-tech materials on store shelves, according to a report...The electronic trash, know as e-waste, is left to leach poisonous materials such as lead, mercury and cadmium into water supplies and the atmosphere. Investigators researching the report found waterways and rural fields littered with broken glass, circuit boards and plastic parts." San Jose Mercury News (February 25, 2002) 1] SD

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MTBE

MTBE Phaseout in California: Draft Study. By Stillwater Associates. Prepared for the California Energy Commission. (The Commission, Sacramento, California) February 18, 2002. 65 p.

Full Text at: www.energy.ca.gov/mtbe

["Order to Double Gas Price? In an economic analysis commissioned by the Davis administration, the consulting firm said the governor should postpone the MTBE ban to November 2005. The energy advisers said the replacement of MTBE with Midwestern-produced ethanol will result in a statewide gasoline shortage of 5 percent to 10 percent, with Southern California motorists feeling the brunt of the shortfall." Sacramento Bee (February 20, 2002) A3.]

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RADIOACTIVE WASTE

ECOS: The Environmental Communiqué of the States. By the Council of State Governments. Vol. 8, No. 4 (Fall 2001). Special Edition. (The Council, Lexington, Kentucky) 2001. 12 p.

Full Text at: stars.csg.org/ecos/2001/fall/fa01ecos_all.pdf

[Includes: "States, Nation and World Look to Protecting Nuclear Facilities and Safeguarding Nuclear Waste Transport;" "Protecting the Nation's Drinking Water Supplies;" "New York City Struggles with Air and Water Quality Issues after Devastating Attacks;" "Arctic Wildlife Refuge Drilling Legislation Holds up Anti-terrorism Bill;" "State Preparedness for Bioterrorism Response;" and others]

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RENEWABLE ENERGY

Generating Solutions: How States Are Putting Renewable Energy Into Action. By Katherine Morrison and Alison Cassady, U.S. PIRG Education Fund. (The Fund, Washington, DC) February 2002. 84 p.

Full Text at: www.uspirg.org/reports/generatingsolutions2_02.pdf

["This report examines 21 states [including California] and their potential for electricity generation from renewable resources using state-of-the-art technology.... Only 2% of our energy comes from clean, renewable sources. However, the potential power output of wind, solar, and geothermal resources in the United States is many times greater than our current total electricity consumption."]

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ETHNIC, RACIAL & CULTURAL DIVERSITY

LATINOS

`Hispanics and the Current Economic Downturn: Will The Receding Tide Sink Hispanics? By Alan B. Krueger and Jonathan M. Orszag. New Lows from New Highs: Latino Economic Losses in the Current Recession. By Roberto Suro and B. Lindsay Lowell. And The Impact of the 2001/2002 Economic Recession on Hispanic Workers: A Cross-Sectional Comparison of Three Generations. By Arturo Gonzalez.; Appendices. Prepared for the Pew Hispanic Center. (The Center, Washington, DC) January 2002. Various pagings.

Full Text at: www.pewhispanic.org/reports.jsp

["Recession Hitting Latinos Hard: More Layoffs and Little Savings Take a Toll, a Report says: The center's researchers predicted the number of unemployed Latinos -- now 7.9 percent -- could climb above 10 percent in the next several years, up from a historic low of 5 percent in 2000.... In California, nearly 11 million Latinos make up 32.4 percent of the state's population." Sacramento Bee (January 25, 2002) D3.]

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GENERAL GOVERNMENT

CAMPAIGN FINANCE

“’Pay to Play’ Politics Examined, with Lessons for Campaign-Finance Reform.” By Fred S. MchChesney. IN: The Independent Review, vol. 6, no. 3 (Winter 2002) pp. 345-364.

Full Text at: www.independent.org/tii/media/pdf/tir63mcchesney.pdf

["Proposals to reform campaign finance are all based on the popular view that citizen payments to politicians are made for special favors.... Campaign-finance reform plans typically include limitations on payments to politicians, especially on 'soft money' payments that do not go directly to candidates.... There are many arguments against limitations ... even when the payments are made for special favors. And if some payments are made to avoid special costs that politicians would otherwise impose, then the case against limiting campaign contributions is even stronger."]

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Campaign Finance Reform in Los Angeles: Lessons From the 2001 City Elections. Vol. I: The Report. 41 p. And Volume II: The Numbers. Various pagings. By the Los Angeles City Ethics Commission. (The Commission, Los Angeles, California) October 2001.

["The study ... shows that a decade of partial public financing has brought both successes and new challenges for City elections.... A record 91 percent of all candidates on the ballot agreed to abide by spending to limit their personal funds in exchange for the opportunity to qualify for limited public matching funds." Guardian (December 2002) 4.]

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ELECTION REFORM

Election Reform: An Analysis of Proposals and the Commission’s Recommendations for Improving America’s Election Systems. By Manuel Alba, Office of Civil Rights Evaluation, Commission on Civil Rights, and others. (The Commission, Washington, DC) November 2001. Various pagings.

Full Text at: www.usccr.gov/vote2000/elecref/main.htm

["This review includes four parts: An overview of existing laws that govern the voting process; An analysis of proposed and recently enacted legislation; An examination of proposals by national organizations that have studied the election process; and Election reform recommendations emerging from the foregoing as well as the Commission's review since the November 2000 election."]

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Revitalizing Our Nation’s Election System. By Maxine Waters and others, Democratic Caucus Special Committee on Election Reform. (The Committee, Washington, DC) November 2001. 124 p.

Full Text at: www.truthout.com/4.Election.Report.pdf

["This report is the culmination of six months of intense study on the issue of election reform. In reaching our findings and recommendations, we relied on testimony from our hearings, reports and studies issued by other organizations, as well as independent research conducted by our staff. This report provides a blueprint for modernizing our election system, professionalizing the way our system is run, and allocating the resources necessary to implement that system."]

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EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

Homeland Security: The Cost to States for Ensuring Public Health and Safety. And Domestic Preparedness Checklist. By the National Governors' Association Center for Best Practices. (The Association, Washington, DC) December 5, 2001. Various pagings.

Full Text at: www.nga.org

["States Plot Their Strategy Against Terror: The nation's governors say they will need $4 billion in the next year.... 46 states are mobilizing to fight terror while pressing Congress and the Bush administration for $4 billion and a national strategy to shore up domestic security." Sacramento Bee (December 27, 2001) A9.]

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Public Health Threats & Emergencies Act: Summary. And Information Alert 2002. By the Assembly on Federal Issues Health Committee, National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL, Denver, Colorado) January 2002. 10 p.

Full Text at: www.ncsl.org/statefed/health/PHTEAS.htm

["The Act authorizes the HHS Secretary to take appropriate actions ... if a disease or disorder presented a public health emergency; or ... a public health emergency, including significant outbreaks of infectious diseases or bioterrorist attacks exists.... Appropriate actions includes making grants and entering into contracts and conducting and supporting investigations.... Secretary Thompson announces plans for disbursements of bioterrorism funds to the states."] www.ncsl.org/statefed/health/PHTEAS.htm

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LOCAL GOVERNMENT

What’s So Special About Special Districts? A Citizen’s Guide to Special Districts in California: Third Edition. By Kimia Mizany & April Manatt, Senate Local Government Committee, California State Senate. 583-S. (The Senate, Sacramento, California) February 2002. 18 p.

["Celebrated as the best example of democracy, cursed as the worst form of fragmented government, and generally misunderstood even by the experts, special districts are California's unique contribution to local government.... This guide explains what special districts are, where districts came from, their legal powers, and different ways to understand them."]

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STATE FINANCES

New Bioterrorism Grants. By The Federal Funds Information for States. FFIS Issue Brief. 02-12. (FFIS, Washington, DC) February 6, 2002. 3 p.

["Tommy G. Thompson, secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS), announced the disposition of $1.25 billion in new federal bioterrorism funds on January 31, 2002. States and territories will receive 20 percent of their allocations very quickly, with the balance to be expended as jointly deemed appropriate.... The programs will be administered through a cooperative agreement administrative structure rather than a grant-in-aid structure."]

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HEALTH

ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE

"Participation in Cognitively Stimulating Activities and Risk of Incident Alzheimer Disease. By Robert S. Wilson and others. IN: JAMA: Journal of the American Medical Association, vol. 287, no. 6 (February 13, 2002) pp. 742-748.

"Study: Active Minds Help Deter Alzheimer's: Elderly people who read and participate in other mind stimulating activities may reduce the chance of developing Alzheimer's disease by nearly half. Robert S. Wilson tracked the intellectual pursuits and measured the cognitive functions of about 800 older nuns, priests and brothers from 40 religious orders across the United States." Sacramento Bee (February 13, 2002) B1.]

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CHILDREN

The State Children’s Health Insurance Program Annual Enrollment Report: Federal Fiscal Year 2001: Oct 1, 2000 - September 30, 2001. By Centers for Medical and Medicaid Services. (The Centers, Baltimore, Maryland) 2002. 12 p.

Full Text at: www.hcfa.gov/init/schip01.pdf

["About 4.6 million U.S. children received health care coverage through state CHIP programs in fiscal year 2001, up 38% from fiscal year 2000, according to a report.... In addition, state CHIP programs enrolled more than 230,000 adults under waivers first approved in January 2001, prior to which adults were not eligible." Kaiser Daily Health Policy Report,(February 7, 2002) 1.]

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MEDICARE

Out-of-Pocket Health Care Expenses for Medicare HMO Beneficiaries: Estimates by Health Status, 1999-2001. By Lori Achman and Marsha Gold, Mathematica Policy Research, Inc. Prepared for The Commonwealth Fund. (The Fund, New York, New York) February 2002. 17 p.

Full Text at: www.cmwf.org

["Medicare has reduced its annual increases in payments to health plans and provider concerns and other factors have created market challenges. This paper explores the effect these changes in benefits have had on enrollees by examining trends in estimated out-of-pocket expenses, particularly as these vary with beneficiaries' health status."]

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NUTRITION

Prevalence of the Metabolic Syndrome Among US Adults: Findings From the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. By Earl S. Ford and others. IN: JAMA: Journal of the American Medical Association, vol. 287, no. 3 (January 16, 2002) pp. 356-359.

[“At least 47 million American adults – or more than 20 percent – have metabolic syndrome, a disorder that often includes a beer belly, high blood pressure, poor cholesterol readings and high blood sugar, according to a disturbing new study…. Though experts say the syndrome may be caused by a combination of genes and lifestyle factors. Lifestyle – including overeating and a lack of exercise – is probably the most important factor…. Experts suspected the syndrome was common but were uncertain about its prevalence. This study puts a number on the scope of the problem.” San Francisco Chronicle (January 17, 2002) A2.]

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PHYSICIANS

Pay for Performance: A Business Case for Rewarding Physician Group Excellence. IHA "Pay For Performance" Initiative. And Pay for Performance Quotes. By the Integrated Health Care Association. (The Association, Walnut Creek, California) January 15, 2002. Various pagings.

Full Text at: www.iha.org/payfpov1.htm

["Bonus Pay Tied To Patient Care: Six health plans are set to assess medical groups for their service quality and to reward good ones.... The plan calls on insurers to develop a common scorecard measuring how well medical groups treat patients. The six plans -- Aetna, Blue Cross of California, Blue Shield of California, CIGNA, Health Net and Pacificare -- are committed to having standards and rewards in place by 2003." Sacramento Bee (January 16, 2002) D1.]

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SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES

"Untreated Gonococcal and Chlamydial Infection in a Probability Sample of Adults." By Charles F. Turner. IN: JAMA: Journal of the American Medical Association, vol. 287, no. 6 (February 13, 2002) pp. 726-733.

["Study Finds Widespread Untreated STD: Gonorrhea, Chlamydia Prevalent among Adults in Baltimore: Results show that nearly one in 12 Baltimore adults, or 7.9 percent, between the ages 18 and 35 harbored some evidence of infection.... The study suggests that in cities where resources are thin, officials may be understating the latent STD problem." San Francisco Chronicle (February 13, 2002) A5.]

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HUMAN SERVICES

CHARITIES

Charitable Choice: Overview of Research. By the U.S. General Accounting Office. (The Office, Washington, DC) January 2002. 21 p.

Full Text at: www.gao.gov/cgi-bin/getrpt?GAO-02-337

[Includes: “Background: How Charitable Choice Affects Faith-Based Organizations (Faith-Based Organizations),” “Background: How Charitable Choice Affects States and Localities,” “To what extent have states responded to charitable choice provisions?” “What factors have limited the collaboration between states and FBOs?” “What issues have been encountered once collaboration has occurred?” and others.]

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CHILD SUPPORT

Child Support Reforms in PRWORA: Initial Impacts. By Elaine Sorensen and Helen Oliver, the Urban Institute. Discussion Paper 02-02. (The Institute, Washington, DC) February 2002. 43 p.

Full Text at: newfederalism.urban.org/pdf/discussion02-02.pdf

["This paper assesses whether the child support reforms enacted in 1996 improved child support outcomes during the initial years after enacting welfare reform.... We find that some of the key child support reforms, most notably new hire directories and improved paternity establishment procedures, have contributed to gains in child support outcomes among low- and middle-income children with a never-married mother, a group that has received little child support in the past."]

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HOMELESS

A Status Report on Hunger and Homelessness in America’s Cities: 2001: A 27-City Survey. By Eugene T. Lowe and others, Conference of Mayors. (The Conference, Washington, DC) December 2001. 137 p.

Full Text at: www.usmayors.org/uscm/hungersurvey/2001/hungersurvey2001.pdf

["The mayors' report showed the largest increase in demand for emergency food and shelter in 10 years. In New York, the number of homeless people is the highest since the city started keeping records. And 40 percent of homeless people are families with children." In These Times (January 2, 2002) 11.]

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LOW INCOME

Relieving the Recession: Nineteen Ways States Can Assist Low-Income Families During the Downturn. Edited by John Springer and Heidi Goldberg, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. (The Center, Washington, DC) February 2002. 75 p.; Appendices.

Full Text at: www.cbpp.org/2-22-02wel.pdf

["This report considers an array of measures that states can adopt to meet the needs of families adversely affected by the economic downturn.... Policy briefs are grouped into two categories: Program modifications designed to assist more low-income families harmed by the recession and to improve benefits for those already being assisted [and] Fiscal strategies designed to help states devote adequate resources to low-income programs while addressing budget shortfalls created by the recession."]

[Request #S4452]

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WELFARE REFORM

Children and Welfare Reform: Issues and Ideas: A Guide for Policymakers and Journalists. By the Social Policy Action Network. The Future of Children. David and Lucile Packard Foundation (The Foundation, Los Altos, California) February 2002. 36 p.

Full Text at: www.futureofchildren.org/usr_doc/tfoc12-1_guide.pdf

["Additional steps are needed to help low-income working families complete the journey out of poverty and to promote the healthy development of children. This issue examines the research on this topic and finds that welfare programs are most likely to benefit children when they address the following basic needs: Adequate income and resources; High quality child care; continuing training and education for parents [and] the need for increased father involvement."]

[Request #S4453]

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INTERNATIONAL READER

The Anti-Globalization Movement Changes Its Tune. By Walter Truett Anderson, Pacific News Service. Prepared for AlterNet. (AlterNet, San Francisco, California) February 15, 2002. 2 p.

Full Text at: www.alternet.org/print.html?StoryID=12423

["The anti-globalization movement isn't really the anti-globalization movement any more. Some of its leading activists are beginning to describe their cause in terms that don't imply dismantling the whole network of linkages that now encircle the world in order to somehow return society to a local or regional scale."]

[Request #S4454]

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Colleges Fighting U.S. Trade Proposal; Say It Favors For-Profit Distance Education. By Andrea Foster. IN: The Chronicle of Higher Education (January 18, 2002).

["A little-known proposal by U.S. officials to remove international trade barriers to higher education has infuriated many college leaders, who say federal policy is being unfairly set by for-profit education providers, including distance-education institutions. The college officials say the proposal could end up undermining many institutions' independence."]

[Request #S4455]

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Competing Visions for the Hemisphere: The Official FTAA Draft versus Alternatives for the Americas. Edited by Sarah Anderson, Institute for Policy Studies and Alliance for Responsible Trade. (The Institute, Washington, DC) January 2002. 12 p.

Full Text at: www.ips-dc.org/projects/global_econ/FTAA%20chart%20-%20english%20-%20final.pdf

["This document contrasts two competing visions for the future of the hemisphere. [One] describes the main elements of the draft Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA).... [The other] offers a contrasting vision put forth by the Hemispheric Social Alliance ... a coalition of labor unions and networks of peasant, indigenous, women's and other citizens groups from across the Americas."]

[Request #S4457]

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TRANSPORTATION

AIRLINE SAFETY

RABA Barons Redirect State Highway Funds. By The Federal Funds Information for States. FFIS Issue Brief. 01-64. (FFIS, Washington, DC) December 18, 2001. 3 p.

["Under the revenue aligned budget authority (RABA) provisions of federal-aid highway legislation, apportionments for federal programs are automatically adjusted when revenue exceeds or lags the forecasts on which the original authorizations are based.... The recently passed 2002 Transportation Appropriations Act reduced ABA distributions by $423 million to finance special projects favored by appropriations committee members.]

[Request #S4458]

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Aviation Security. By Laurie Holmes, National Conference of State Legislatures. Legisbrief. Vol. 10, No. 11. (NCSL, Denver, Colorado) February 2002. 2 p.

["A compromise aviation security package requires airport baggage screeners to be federal employees.... Airports are required to have systems for detecting explosives in all checked bags by December 31, 2002.... The bill creates a new Transportation Security Administration within the transportation department, headed by an undersecretary."]

[Request #S4459]

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STUDIES TO COME
[The following studies, reports, and documents have been ordered or requested, but have not yet arrived. Requests may be placed, and copies will be provided when the material arrives.]

ENVIRONMENT & NATURAL RESOURCES

LAND USE

Growing Smart: Legislative Guidebook: Model Statutes for Planning and the Management of Change. And User Manual. Edited by Stuart Meck. (American Planning Association, Washington, DC) 2002.

["Topics covered in the Guidebook include a wide range of state, regional, and local comprehensive and functional planning issues.... The User Manual helps those interested in statutory reform navigate through the Guidebook and, by means of checklists and case studies, select from the options available."]

[Request #S4460]

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GENERAL GOVERNMENT

ELECTIONS

Municipal Elections in California: Turnout, Timing and Competition. By Zoltan Hajnal and others, Public Policy Institute of California. (The Institute, San Francisco, California) 2002. 111 p.

["The study will focus ... on the timing of elections and the issue of whether 'on-cycle' local elections increase voter participation. It will also examine the roles that other social, political, and institutional factors such as district versus at-large elections, mayoral power, presence of initiatives, term limits, and competitiveness of elections play in explaining variations in local voter turnout."]

[Request #S4438]

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POLITICS & PUBLIC POLICY

Making Government Work: California Cases in Policy, Politics, and Public Management. Edited by Barry Keene. (Institute of Governmental Studies, Berkeley, California) 2002. 210 p.

["Shaping public policy in a huge, diverse state like California is seldom easy.... The cases presented here are like political fables. They are stories with a lesson. And they can help people acquire the skills and techniques that are essential to making government work."]

[Request #S4461]

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VOTERS & VOTING

The 2000 Election: Immigrant Voters and the Future of the Immigration Debate. By National Immigration Forum, (Washington, DC.) 2002.

["New immigrant voters, Raghunathan points out, are crucial in many elections, but particularly important in several of the key swing states in the presidential election: New York, California, Florida and Illinois.... (Suman)Raghunathan, a second-generation American of Indian heritage, was one of a panel of experts on immigration talking about 'building political power' at the National Immigration Forum's Annual Conference in Washington .... " United Press International (February 2, 2002) 1.]

[Request #S4462]

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HEALTH

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

Health Information Technology in the New Millennium: Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society Forecast, 2002-2006. By Russell Coile, Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society. (The Society, Chicago, Illinois) [2001.] Various pagings.

["Moving into the first decade of the new millenium, the field of health care technology is recovering from the triple whammy impact of Y2K, the Balanced Budget Act, and HIPAA.... This forecast reflects the consensus of healthcare executives, information systems managers and industry consultants based on a national Delphi survey conducted by the Society."]

[Request #S4463]

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INTERNATIONAL READER

Dirt is in the Eye of the Beholder: The World Bank Air Pollution Intensities for Mexico. By Francisco Aguayo and others, Global Development and Environment Institute, Tufts University. (The Institute, Medford, Massachusetts) 2001. 25 p.

["The World Bank embarked on the creation of a second phase of pollution coefficients with actual data from the developing countries.... Research for this paper has identified a number of errors and shortcomings in the construction of the Mexico data. In addition to pointing out some of these shortcomings, we offer a corrected set of intensities that can be used until these data are replaced by better estimates."]

[Request #S4456]

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