Subject: Studies in the News 02-19 (March 21, 2002)


CALIFORNIA RESEARCH BUREAU
CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY
Studies in the News
Children and Family Supplement


Contents This Week

Introductory Material CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT
   Violence prediction guidelines
DEMOGRAPHY
   State trends of at-risk children
   Demographic profile of low-income children
ECONOMY
   Newspaper coverage of child care
EDUCATION
   Early literacy skills and academic achievement
   Transition to kindergarten
EMPLOYMENT
   North Carolina's child care workforce
HEALTH
   Accessibility problems
   Child dental expenditures
   Insurance for undocumented children
   Effects of stress on parenting
   Minorities health care survey
   Nationwide profile of food and nutrition programs
   Lifelong threat of childhood obesity
   Psychological intervention review
   Ecological perspectives of infant development
HUMAN SERVICES
   Regulation of child care
   Evolving child care policies
STUDIES TO COME
   Domestic violence and children
   Children with special health needs
   Children of depressed parents
Introduction to Studies in the News

Studies in the News: Children and Family Supplement is a service provided to the California Children and Families Commission (CCFC) by the State Library's Research Bureau and State Information and Reference Center. The service features weekly lists of current articles focusing on Children and Family policy. Prior lists can be viewed from the California State Library's Web Catalog by selecting the Special Resources link on the opening page at http://www.lib.state.ca.us/. Service to State Employees:

  • When available, the URL for the full text of each item is provided.

  • Items in the State Library collection can be checked out to state officials and staff.

  • Access to all materials listed will be provided by the State Information Reference Center, either by e-mail to cslsirc@library.ca.gov or by calling 654-0261.

The following studies are currently on hand:

CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT

RESEARCH

Violence Prediction: Guidelines for the Forensic Practitioner. Second Edition. By Harold V. Hall and Ronald S. Ebert. (Charles C. Thomas Publisher, Springfield, Illinois) 2002. 282 p.

["This book is designed for those involved in the assessment, research, or training of individual violence prediction, presenting a variety of methods and overview of the accuracy, decision-analysis, and impacts of each." NOTE: Violence ... is available for 3-day loan.]

[Request #S4557]

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DEMOGRAPHY

CHILDREN

Children At Risk: State Trends 1990-2000. By Annie E. Casey Foundation. (The Foundation, Baltimore, Maryland) 2002. 120 p.

Full Text at: www.aecf.org/kidscount/c2ss/pdfs/entire_book.pdf

[“The number of California children living in poverty increased by more than 430,000 over the decade ending in 2000, according to this survey. Nearly 1.8 million of the state’s children, or about 20 percent live below the poverty level, compared with the 1990 total of about 1.4 million or 18%. Though California actually improved in eight of the 10 areas examined in the study, the state’s proportion of children at risk remained above the national average in five of those areas.” Los Angeles Times (March 8, 2002) 1].

[Request #S4558]

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Low-Income Children in the United States: A Brief Demographic Profile. By the National Center for Children in Poverty, Columbia University. (The Center, New York, New York) March 2002. 1 p.

Full Text at: cpmcnet.columbia.edu/dept/nccp/YCPfact302.pdf

["The United States' child poverty rate is substantially higher -- often two-to-three times higher -- than that of most other major Western industrialized nations.... The child poverty rate is highest for African-American (30 percent) and Latino children (28 percent).... 6 percent of children in America, 5 million, live in extreme poverty.... The Profile ends by identifying the societal benefits of reducing child poverty."]

[Request #S4559]

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ECONOMY

MEDIA

Silent Revolution: How U.S. Newspapers Portray Child Care. Berkeley Media Studies Group. February 2002. 20 p.

Full Text at: www.bmsg.org/pdf/Issue11_0102.pdf

["Child care is so big it touches the hearts and strains the pocketbooks of 10 million American families, but according to this report ... newspapers are paying scant attention. On the business pages, child care, a $5.4 billion-a-year industry in California, is all but invisible. When child care is covered, newspapers now portray it as a social good, even as a chance to 'level the playing field' for working poor families." Connect for Kids (March 11, 2002)1.]

[Request #S4574]

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EDUCATION

EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH

Children's Reading and Mathematics Achievement in Kindergarten and First Grade. By Kristin Denton, Education Statistics Services Institute and Jerry West, National Center for Education Statistics. National Center for Education Statistics (The Center, Washington, DC) March 2002. 78 p.

Full Text at: nces.ed.gov/pubs2002/2002125.pdf

["This report examines the relationship of children's early literacy skills and resources at the start of kindergarten to their reading and mathematics achievement at the end of kindergarten and first grade. It describes these relationships for children from different race/ethnic backgrounds and for boys and girls. Children who have specific cognitive knowledge and skills, who are read to frequently, who possess positive approaches to learning, and who enjoy very good or excellent general health seem to perform better in reading and mathematics after one and even two years of formal schooling than children who do not have these resources when they enter school." Connect for Kids (March 11, 2002)1.].

[Request #S4560]

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SCHOOL READINESS

Transition to Kindergarten. By Robert Pianta, University of Virginia, and others. National Center for Early Development and Learning. Early Childhood Research and Policy Briefs. Vol. 2, No. 2 (The Center, Chapel Hill, North Carolina) Winter 2002. 4 p.

Full Text at: www.fpg.unc.edu/~ncedl/PDFs/TranBrief.pdf

["Research by the Center indicates that the transition practices commonly used in schools may not be well suited to the needs of children and families.... The transition period involves both children and their families' adjustment to kindergarten. The best use of family resources for a child's education requires attention to how schools and families can form partnerships during this period."]

[Request #S4562]

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EMPLOYMENT

WORKFORCE

Working in Child Care in North Carolina 2001: Executive Summary. By Sue Russell and others. By the Child Care Services Association. (The Association, Chapel Hill, North Carolina) 2001. 13 p.

["A new study shows that 82% of North Carolina's child care teachers have a college degree or have completed college coursework, yet half of them earn less than $16,000 a year. The report takes an in-depth look at the education and compensation of teachers who care for North Carolina's young children that spend their day in licensed child care. Some of the findings of the study include: 31% of child care teachers left their jobs in 2001, down from 42% in 1993; 34% of child care teachers currently or have recently received one or more forms of public assistance; 27% of child care teachers do not have health insurance." NAEYC Update (March 11, 2002)1.]

[Request #S4561]

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HEALTH

DENTAL CARE

"Problems With Access to Dental Care for Medicaid-Insured Children: What Caregivers Think." By M. Mofidi. IN: American Journal of Public Health, vol. 92, no. 1, (January 2002) pp. 1-15.

["Dental disease is the most common health problem in this country, yet even those with public insurance have difficulty gaining access to primary dental services... This study examines some of the barriers caregivers face, including finding providers, arranging appointments, transportation, long waiting times, and disrespectful and discriminatory behavior from staff and providers because of their race and public assistance status." Connect for Kids (March 11, 2002)1.]

[Request #S4563]

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"Child Dental Expenditures: 1996." By Burton L. Edelstein and others. IN: Pediatric Dentistry, vol 24, no.1 (2002) pp. 11-17.

["Poor families are paying a higher portion of their children's dental care expenses out-of-pocket than middle-income families because their children are not receiving the dental care they are eligible for under state Medicaid programs for a number of reasons, including dentists not accepting out-of-pocket payments for services covered by Medicaid, families not reporting their child as Medicaid eligible, or the dentist not a Medicaid provider." Connect for Kids (March 11, 2002)1.]

[Request #S4564]

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INSURANCE

Evaluation of the Los Angeles CalKids Program: Full Report. By Glenn Melnick and others, Center for Health Financing, Policy and Management, University of Southern California. Prepared for the California HealthCare Foundation (The Foundation, Oakland, California) February 2002. 97 p.

Full Text at: admin.chcf.org/documents/chcf/CalKidsEvaluationFullReport.pdf

["The LA CalKids program is a pioneer in its attempt to provide formal health insurance to low-income, undocumented children.... This evaluation presents ... valuable information and insights on the characteristics of low-income undocumented children, to analyze their experience under a managed health care insurance program, and to document the effects of LA CalKids in meeting the health care and health insurance needs of this population."]

[Request #S4566]

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MENTAL HEALTH

"Depression and Negative Life Events Among Pregnant African-American and Hispanic Women." By Luis H. Zayas and others. IN: Women's Health Issues, vol. 12, no. 1 (January/February 2002) pp. 16-22.

["More than half of pregnant blacks and Hispanics may be depressed, according to this study that also suggests that stressful life events and poverty may contribute to the relatively high rates among these women ... affecting not only the pregnant woman, but also her ability to care for a newborn. Children of depressed mothers were also found to be more likely to have signs of depression as well as chemical and hormonal abnormalities." Center for the Advancement of Health (February 26, 2002) 1.].

[Request #S4567]

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MINORITIES

Diverse Communities Common Concerns: Assessing Health Care Quality for Minority Americans: Findings from the Commonwealth Fund 2001 Health Care Quality Survey. By Karen Scott Collins and others. Commonwealth Fund of New York (The Fund, New York, New York) March 2002. 80 p.

Full Text at: www.cmwf.org/programs/minority/collins_diversecommunities_523.pdf

[“Latinos, African Americans and Asian Americans are more likely than whites to feel they are treated disrespectfully when they seek health care and have problems communicating with their doctors, according to this report. The minority group members also feel they would receive better care if they were a different race or ethnicity, feel their doctors do not listen to them, and report they do not understand what their doctors say.” The Sacramento Bee (March 7, 2002) 1.]

[Request #S4568]

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NUTRITION

State of the States: A Profile of Food and Nutrition Programs Across the Nation. Food Research and Action Center (The Center, Washington, DC) February 26, 2002. 70 p.

Full Text at: www.frac.org/html/publications/stateofstates02.pdf

["Nutrition Program Data Said to Support Call for More Spending on Food Stamp Program: Large gaps remain in the federal government's efforts to make nutrition programs available to low-income children and adults.... The report claims that the federal Food Stamp Program is reaching millions fewer poor people today than several years ago." White House Bulletin (February 26, 2002) 1.]

[Request #S4565]

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OBESITY

Childhood Obesity: A Lifelong Threat to Health. By Kristen Kiefer and others. Center on an Aging Society, Georgetown University (The Center, Washington, DC) March 2002. 6 p.

Full Text at: www.georgetown.edu/research/ihcrp/agingsociety/obesity/obesity.pdf

["Almost 14 million children (24 percent of the U.S. population ages 2 to 17)are obese. This second in a series of data profiles on chronic and disabling conditions culls data from two national health surveys as well as from the latest research on this problem to provide a picture of which children are at greatest risk for obesity, what factors contribute to obesity in children, and how obesity affects their lives." HandsNet (March 15, 2002)1.].

[Request #S4569]

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RESEARCH

What Works for Children and Adolescents? A Critical Review of Psychological Interventions with Children, Adolescents and their Families. By Alan Carr. (Routledge, New York, New York) 2001. 361 p.

[Includes: "Child Abuse;" "Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder;" " Oppositional Deficit Disorder;" "Adolescent Conduct Problems;" "Anxiety Disorders;" "Depression and Grief;" and others. NOTE: What Works ... is available for 3-day loan.]

[Request #S4570]

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Infant Development: Ecological Perspectives. By Hiram E. Fitzgerald and others. (RoutledgeFalmer, New York, New York) 2002. 327 p.

[Includes: "Infant Attention and the Development of Cognition;" "Nutrition;" "Ecological Influences on Mother-Infant Relationships;" "Daycare and Maternal Employment in the 21st Century;" and others. NOTE: Infant Development ... is available for 3-day loan.]

[Request #S4571]

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HUMAN SERVICES

CHILD CARE

Regulation of Child Care. By Shari Azer and Gwen Morgan, National Center for Early Development and Learning. Early Childhood Research and Policy Briefs. Vol. 2, No. 1 (The Center, Chapel Hill, North Carolina) Winter 2002. 6 p.

Full Text at: www.fpg.unc.edu/~ncedl/PDFs/RegBrief.pdf

["Licensing is the first line of protection for children in out-of-family child care settings. In general, licensing intends to insure that the care provided is good enough to do no harm to children -- that the building is safe and sanitary and that adequate developmental and caring relationships are provided.... This brief addresses the state of knowledge of regulation in the United States."]

[Request #S4572]

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SOCIAL POLICY

Unfinished Agenda: Child Care for Low-Income Families Since 1996--Implications for Federal and State Policy. By Jennifer Mezey and others. (Center for Law and Social Policy, Washington, DC) March 2002. 81 p.

Full Text at: www.clasp.org/pubs/childcare/finalreport.pdf

["Despite increases in child care funding and the number of children served since 1996, much unmet need remains for child care assistance and early learning opportunities. In addition, deteriorating economic conditions and budget crises in many states are jeopardizing recent child care gains. This report represents the results of a project conducted with organizations in Illinois, Iowa, Maine, Texas, and Washington State to examine the experiences of low-income parents, child care providers, and state child care systems. It synthesizes findings from five separately published reports and puts them into a national context."]

[Request #S4573]

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STUDIES TO COME
[The following studies, reports, and documents have been ordered or requested, but have not yet arrived. Requests may be placed, and copies will be provided when the material arrives.]

CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

Domestic Violence in the Lives of Children: The Future of Research, Intervention, and Social Policy. By Sandra A. Graham-Bermann and Jeffrey L. Edleson. (American Psychological Association, Washington, DC) 2001. 333 p.

[Includes: "Longer Term Effects of Children's Exposure to Domestic Violence;" "Resilience in Children Exposed to Domestic Violence;" "Overcoming Mother Blaming? Future Directions for Research on Mothering and Domestic Violence;" "Fatherhood and Domestic Violence; Exploring the Role of Men Who Batter in the Lives of Their Children;" and others. NOTE: Domestic ... will be available for 3-day loan.]

[Request #S4575]

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HEALTH

HEALTH CARE

Target Population Estimations: A Guide for Assessing Quality Care for Children with Special Health Care Needs. By Colleen A. Monahan and Henry T. Ireys. (University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health, Chicago, Illinois) 2000. 70 p.

[Includes: "Nathional Health Interview Survey and Children with Special Health Care Needs;" " Creating State and Local Estimates of the Population of Children with Special Health Care Needs;" and others. NOTE: Target ... will be available for 3-day loan.]

[Request #S4576]

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MENTAL HEALTH

Children of Depressed Parents: Mechanisms of Risk and Implications for Treatment. By Sherryl H. Goodman and Ian H. Gotlib. (American Psychological Association, Washington, DC) 2002. 352 p.

[Includes: "Maternal Depression, Infant Psychobiological Development, and Risk for Depression;" "Parental Depression and Child Attachment: Hostile and Helpless Profiles of Parent and Child Behavior Among Families at Risk;" and others. NOTE: Children of Depressed ... will be available for 3-day loan.]

[Request #S4577]

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