Subject: Studies in the News 02-21 (April 2, 2002)


CALIFORNIA RESEARCH BUREAU
CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY
Studies in the News
Children and Family Supplement


Contents This Week

Introductory Material CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT
   Childhood predictors of youth offenders
EDUCATION
   Charter schools & low-income students
   Preschool programs in charter schools
   Colorado teacher survey on school readiness
   Integrating child and adolescent development
   High-poverty district school reforms
   Promises & problems of special education
HEALTH
   Obese children and diabetes
   Child care regulations & unintentional injuries
   Toolkit for improving preventive care services
   Depressive symptoms and low-income mothers
   Mapping teenage birth hot spots
   Ideas for states to reduce hunger
HUMAN SERVICES
   Children at-risk -- state trends
   State child welfare legislation
   Effects of welfare on children
   Foster care compliance
   Welfare benefits for non-citizens
   Linking assessment and intervention
   How welfare reform shapes lives & communities
   Family well-being after welfare reform
STUDIES TO COME
   Early Head Start
Introduction to Studies in the News

Studies in the News: Children and Family Supplement is a service provided to the California Children and Families Commission (CCFC) by the State Library's Research Bureau and State Information and Reference Center. The service features weekly lists of current articles focusing on Children and Family policy. Prior lists can be viewed from the California State Library's Web Catalog by selecting the Special Resources link on the opening page at http://www.lib.state.ca.us/.

Service to State Employees:

  • When available, the URL for the full text of each item is provided.

  • Items in the State Library collection can be checked out to state officials and staff.

  • Access to all materials listed will be provided by the State Information Reference Center, either by e-mail to cslsirc@library.ca.gov or by calling 654-0261.

The following studies are currently on hand:

CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT

RESEARCH

"Childhood Predictors of Offense Trajectories." By Ick-Joong Chung and others. IN: Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency, vol. 39, no. 1 (February 2002) pp. 60-90.

["This study seeks to identify childhood predictors of different offense trajectories. Five offense trajectories were identified using semiparametric, group-based modeling: nonoffenders, late onsetters, desisters, escalators, and chronic offenders.... Among youth already delinquent at age 13, escalators were distinguished from desisters by peer, school, and neighborhood factors."]

[Request #S4623]

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EDUCATION

CHARTER SCHOOLS

California Charter Schools Serving Low-SES Students: An Analysis of the Academic Performance Index. By Simeon Slovacek and others, California State University, Los Angeles. (Program Evaluation and Research Collaborative, Los Angeles, California) March 11, 2002. 13 p.

Full Text at: www.calstatela.edu/academic/ccoe/c_perc/rpt1.pdf

["Advocates are elated about a new study that for the first time suggests charters are good for low-income students .... The new study compares three years of test scores at 6,520 traditional schools with scores at 93 charters....The study concluded: 'California charter schools are doing a better job of improving the academic performance of (the state's) most at-risk students, those who are low-income, than noncharter California public schools.'" San Francisco Chronicle (March 13, 2002) A23.]

[Request #S4624]

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"New Twist in Charter Schools: Preschool Programs." By Linda Jacobson. IN: Education Week, vol. 21, no. 27 (March 20, 2002) pp. 1,12,13.

Full Text at: www.edweek.com/ew/newstory.cfm?slug=27preschool.h21

["Although they have quietly emerged in sites scattered around the country, charter schools with preschool classrooms have yet to attract the attention of many experts who follow the charter movement. Yet such preschool programs have emerged for much the same reason as charter schools themselves: They meet a need or provide an alternative that is not available within the existing public system." Education Commission of the States (March 20, 2002).]

[Request #S4625]

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EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

First-Ever Statewide K-1 Teacher Survey on School Readiness. By Educare Colorado and Colorado Children's Campaign. (Educare Colorado, Denver, Colorado) February 20, 2002. 21 p.

["A first-ever state survey of Colorado kindergarten and first-grade teachers identifies the skills teachers believe young children should have when they enter school -- and finds a significant number lack those skills, like the ability to interact positively with other children, to count to 20, and to recognize their written name." Connect for Kids Weekly (March 18, 2002).]

[Request #S4626]

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Child & Adolescent Development: An Integrated Approach. By Karen B. Owens. (Wadsworth/Thomson Learning, Belmont, California) 2002. 602 p.; Appendices.

["This text organizes children's development from birth through adolescence chronologically. Within each development stage, the physical, cognitive, and socioemotional development of children are examined." NOTE: Child ... is available for 3-day loan.]

[Request #S4627]

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EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH

Challenges of Conflicting School Reforms: Effects of New American Schools in a High-Poverty District. By Mark Berends and others. (RAND, Santa Monica, California) 2002. 163 p.

Full Text at: www.rand.org/publications/MR/MR1483/

["A decade ago, New American Schools (NAS) launched an ambitious effort for whole-school reform to address the perceived lagging achievement of American students and the lackluster school reform attempts that have produced so few meaningful changes. RAND assessed the effects of NAS designs on classroom practice and student achievement in a sample of schools in a high-poverty district. It found that while high-stakes tests may motivate these schools to increase performance, they may also provide disincentives to adopt richer, more in-depth curricula that could improve students' learning opportunities."]

[Request #S4628]

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SPECIAL EDUCATION

Special Education: Promises and Problems. By Priscilla Pardini. IN: Rethinking Schools Online, vol. 16, no. 3 (Spring 2002) 11 p.

Full Text at: www.rethinkingschools.org/Archives/16_03/Prom163.htm

["Will Congress fulfill its 27-year-old pledge to fund students with special needs or will the problems in special education be used as rationale to dismantle the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act? This article takes a closer look." Electronic Policy Network (March 6, 2002).]

[Request #S4629]

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HEALTH

DIABETES

"Prevalence of Impaired Glucose Tolerance Among Children and Adolescents with Marked Obesity." By Ranjan Sinha and others. IN: The New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 346, no. 11 (March 14, 2002) pp. 802-811.

["Twenty-five percent of obese children could be at risk of developing Type II diabetes "sooner rather than later" .... This study examined 167 severely obese, multiethnic children and adolescents ... and found that many have a diminished capacity to metabolize blood sugar, an "established risk factor" for Type II diabetes, once considered a "disease of middle age." Data from several cities nationwide indicate that children with Type II diabetes has risen from less than 5% prior to 1994 to between 30-50%."]

[Request #S4630]

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INJURY PREVENTION

Accidents Will Happen?: Unintentional Childhood Injuries and the Effects of Child Care Regulations. By Janet Currie and V. Joseph Hotz,University of California at Los Angeles and NBER. (NBER, Washington, DC) 2001. 37 p.

Full Text at: www.jcpr.org/wpfiles/currie_hotz.pdf

["This study examines the effects of child care regulation on rates of accidental injury using both micro data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, and Vital Statistics mortality records. Estimates from both data sources suggest that requiring day care center directors to have more education reduces the incidence of unintentional injuries. An auxiliary analysis of the choice of child care mode confirms that higher educational requirements tend to crowd some children out of care, as do regulations requiring frequent inspections of child care facilities and lower pupil-teacher ratios." JCPR Policy Briefs (vol.4, no. 1).]

[Request #S4631]

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MEDICAL STANDARDS

Improving Preventive Care Services for Children: A Best Clinical and Administrative Practices Toolkit for Medicaid Health Plans. By Margaret L. Oehlmann and Constance L. Martin, Center for Health Care Strategies. (CHCS, Lawrenceville, New Jersey) March 2002. 66 p.

Full Text at: www.chcs.org/ManagedCare/pdf/improvingpreventivecare.pdf

["This Toolkit provides a practical approach for increasing the quality of preventive care for children covered under Medicaid and SCHIP. It includes a simple process improvement model to consistently follow; strategies for identification, stratification, outreach, and intervention, including plan case studies; tools to encourage providers to adopt streamlined preventive care practices; and communications tactics for creating change." HandsNet (March 22, 2002).]

[Request #S4632]

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MENTAL HEALTH

Does Work Have an Impact on Depressive Symptoms and Parenting Among Low-Income Mothers of Head Start Preschoolers? By C. Cybele Raver. Joint Center for Poverty Research, Northwestern University (The Center, Evanston, Illinois) JCPR Working Paper 274. November 19, 2001. 22 p.

Full Text at: www.jcpr.org/wpfiles/raver.pdf

["This study examines whether work has any direct or indirect influence on parenting style, through mothers' perceived financial strain and mothers' depressive symptoms.... [It] aims to circumvent debates regarding whether the effects of maternal employment on family functioning are due to variability in child care usage or quality."]

[Request #S4643]

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RESEARCH

"Small Area Analysis on a Large Scale -- The California Experience in Mapping Teenage Birth "Hot Spots" for Resource Allocation." By Don Taylor and Gilberto Chavez. IN: Journal of Public Health Management and Practice, vol. 8, no. 2 (March 2002) pp. 33-45.

["The maps of teenage births achieved their original purpose of providing more precision in delivering teenage pregnancy prevention funding at the local level. As the state of California's financial commitment to fund teenage-pregnancy-prevention activities increased, program managers are requesting more and better information to justify funding areas with the greatest need. This article discusses the evolution of the California experience in mapping births to adolescents ages 15 through 19 throughout the state, and the application of geographic information systems (GIS) to determine how to allocate funds for preventing teenage pregnancy at the community level."]

[Request #S4633]

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STATE HEALTH POLICY

Good Choices in Hard Times: Fifteen Ideas for States to Reduce Hunger and Stimulate the Economy. By Michelle Albee and others. Food Research and Action Center (The Center, Washington DC) February 2002. 29 p.

Full Text at: www.frac.org/html/publications/stimulus2002.pdf

["This resource guide contains a number of ideas for actions in food stamps, afterschool food, school meals and other child nutrition programs that states, schools and cities can implement quickly.... All of the actions described are permissible state and local choices under existing federal statutes and regulations."]

[Request #S4634]

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HUMAN SERVICES

CHILDREN

Children at Risk: State Trends 1990-2000: A First Look at Census 2000 Supplementary Service Data. Kids Count. Annie E. Casey Foundation (The Foundation, Baltimore, Maryland) 2002. 120 p.

Full Text at: www.aecf.org/kidscount/c2ss/pdfs/entire_book.pdf

["Nationally the child poverty rate is down, but in quite a few states the proportion of children living in poverty has actually risen over the last decade. This new Kids Count report uses the latest census data to document enormous diversity across the states, with some improving on many more indicators than others. There are also wide state differences on specific indicators. Broad and widespread improvements in child well-being during the 90s are surprisingly modest given the economic boom ... some of the progress and policies that led to these improvements in the states are vulnerable to cutbacks as state budgets face crises." Connect For Kids (March 11, 2002)]

[Request #S4635]

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State Child Welfare Legislation: 2001. By Steve Christian, National Conference of State Legislatures. State Legislative Report. Vol. 27, No. 5. (NCSL, Denver, Colorado) February 2002. 9 p.

["Many bills address emerging child welfare issues, such as safe havens for abandoned infants, children's exposure to domestic violence and manufacture of illegal drugs, kinship care, family support, independent living services for youth emancipating from foster care, and compliance with federal child welfare laws and regulations.... The appendix contains citations to the legislation referenced in this report."]

[Request #S4636]

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Children of Current and Former Welfare Recipients: Similarly at Risk. By Kathryn Tout and others. Child Trends Research Brief (Child Trends, Washington, DC) March 2002. 8 p.

Full Text at: www.childtrends.org/PDF/leaversRB302.pdf

["Research...indicates that children's risk for poor developmental outcomes was not alleviated when their parents left welfare. What the research continues to conclude is that poverty and the disadvantages associated with poverty are key risk factors for children, whether their parents have left welfare, remain on welfare or have never entered the welfare system."]

[Request #S4637]

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FOSTER CARE

Sacramento County Department of Human Assistance Foster Care Payment System: Report. By the Office of the California State Controller. (The Office, Sacramento, California) March 7, 2002. Various pagings.

["The primary finding is that the Department of Health & Human Services (DHHS)is not complying with statutory requirements intended to promptly move foster care children into safe and permanent placements through reunification with their families or through termination of parental rights and adoption. The report recommends that the DHHS develop a tracking system for management to ensure that timely actions are taken and appropriate services provided."]

[Request #S4638]

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IMMIGRATION

Welfare Benefits for Non-Citizens. By Michael Fix and Ron Haskins. The Brookings Institution (The Institution, Washington, DC) Policy Brief No. 15. February 2002. 8 p.

Full Text at: www.brookings.edu/dybdocroot/wrb/publications/pb/pb15.pdf

["This policy brief reviews the rationale for excluding legal immigrants from welfare reform benefits and the resulting hardships on these families and their citizen children. At least some modest restoration of benefits, including some that provide eligibility to post-1996 entrants, seems destined to have major support from Congress and the Bush administration." Connect for Kids March 11, 2002)]

[Request #S4639]

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SOCIAL POLICY

"Linking Assessment and Intervention." IN: Zero to Three, vol. 21, no. 4 (February/March 2001) 61 p.

[Includes: "Fusing Assessment and Intervention: Changing Parents' and Providers' Views of Young Children;" "The DIR (Developmental, Individual-Difference, Relationship-Based) Approach to Assessment and Intervention Planning;" "The Birth of A New Instrument: The Infant-Toddler and Family Instrument (ITFI);" "Screening, Assessment, Curriculum Planning and Evaluation: Engaging Parents in the Process;" and others. NOTE: "Linking ..." is available for 3-day loan.]

[Request #S4640]

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WELFARE REFORM

Welfare Reform: How It Shapes the Lives of Infants and Toddlers, Their Families and Their Communities. Executive Summary. Compiled by Sheila Brookes, Center for Family Policy and Research. (The Center, Columbia, Missouri) January 2002. 4 p.

Full Text at: mucenter.missouri.edu/brief020502.pdf

["This study used interviews with state and local policy makers, service providers, and parents to identify areas of promise and of concern. Researchers found some successes, especially when welfare-to-work mothers found good jobs with benefits and quality care for their children, but in many cases inflexible policies caused instability in the lives of mothers and their very young children." Connect for Kids (March 4, 2002).]

[Request #S4641]

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Family Well-Being After Welfare Reform. Edited by Douglas J. Besharov, Maryland School of Public Affairs, Welfare Reform Academy, Committee to Review Welfare Reform Research (The Academy, College Park, Maryland) 2002. 10 p.

Full Text at: www.welfareacademy.org/pubs/familywellbeing/familywellbeing-frontmatter.pdf

["Since 1994, welfare rolls have decreased by almost 60 percent nationwide. Are low-income children and their families better off—or worse off—after welfare reform? This paper explores concerns across a broad range of areas, identifying the relevant data sets, surveys, and other materials that could aid this assessment." HandsNet (March 8, 2002)]

[Request #S4642]

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STUDIES TO COME
[The following studies, reports, and documents have been ordered or requested, but have not yet arrived. Requests may be placed, and copies will be provided when the material arrives.]

HEALTH

CHILDREN

Early Head Start: Special Issue. Edited By Hiram E. Fitzgerald and others. Entire Issue of: Infant Mental Health Journal, vol.23, Issue 1-2, (February 2002). 257 p.

["In just 6 years, Early Head Start has grown from 68 initial grantees to some 650 programs and, by early 2001, was serving more than 55,000 families with infants and toddlers throughout the country. This issue describes the program, its growth, and the changing policy and program environment of its first five years. It also explains how the federal and regional infrastructure supports Early Head Start through training, technical assistance, and monitoring; summarizes the design and conduct of the national evaluation and local research studies; presents the key lessons that the research has yielded so far; and concludes with an assessment of the challenges ahead for creating a solid base of knowledge for programs serving low-income families with infants and toddlers." HandsNet (March 22, 2002). NOTE: Early ... will be available for 3-day loan.]

[Request #S4644]

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