Subject: Studies in the News 02-28 (May 9, 2002)


CALIFORNIA RESEARCH BUREAU
CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY
Studies in the News


California -- One Hundred and Fifty Years Ago

May 1852 - "In May 1852, at Foster and Atchinson's Bar in Yuba County, a meeting was held and a resolution was passed denying Chinese the right to hold claims and requiring all Chinese to leave. This was followed by a mass meeting in the Columbia Mining District in the southern mines, where a resolution was passed to exclude 'Asiatics and South Sea Islanders' from mining activities.... When they were prevented from mining gold in the mining districts, they became merchants, laborers, or laundrymen, or sought employment elsewhere."  A History of Chinese Americans in California p. 72  

May 1852 - "Despite hostility and discrimination, Chinese continued to immigrate to California to avail themselves of whatever opportunities awaited them here.... In 1852, the first performance of Cantonese opera was held in the American Theatre on Sansome Street, and several months later, the first Chinese theatre building was completed. "  A History of Chinese Americans in California p. 36  

Contents This Week

Introductory Material CALIFORNIA READER
   Survey of Central Valley
   Economic forecast of Sacramento region
CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT
   Crime rates climb for second year
   Supreme Court case on race and jury selection
   Dangerous mentally ill offender law
   Video surveillance applications
CULTURE AND SOCIETY
   National investment in the arts
   Rudeness in America
   Changing the lives of the disabled
DEMOGRAPHY
   Preparing for an aging world
   Internet use survey
ECONOMY
   Banking on multinationals
   Completing military base closures
   Card clubs in California
   Income inequality in California
EDUCATION
   Ranking of the states
   Cost of accountability programs
   Out-of-school opportunities
   Master plan for California schools update
   College tuition
   School readiness improvement
EMPLOYMENT
   Employment trends among young black men
   Income inequality
ENERGY
   PUC plan for PG&E bankruptcy
   Attorney General sues four energy providers
   Energy crisis postmortem
   Taxpayer group sues PUC on Edison settlement
   Attorney General sues two electricity providers
ENVIRONMENT & NATURAL RESOURCES
   Biodiversity state of the union
   Open space protection
   Water transfer controversy
GENERAL GOVERNMENT
   Grading the counties
   National evaluation of county management
   Program evaluation in the states
   State income tax burden on low income families
HEALTH
   Economics of alcohol abuse policies
   Long-term care and Olmstead decision
   Accessible information technology
   Strategies to curb childhood obesity
   Substance abuse treatment and diversion programs
HOUSING
   Low-Income elderly and assisted living services
HUMAN SERVICES
   Guidelines for out-of-home child care
   TANF reauthorization and children
   Indicators of children's well-being
   Immigrant households and public assistance
   State policy choices under welfare reform
   TANF programs for American Indian families
   New lives for poor families
INTERNATIONAL READER
   Building institutions for markets
   Interdependent world prosperity
NATIONAL READER
   Few in U.S. understand science
TRANSPORTATION
   Reducing driver distractions
   School bus safety law
WASHINGTON READER
   California Institute's briefing on Federal issues.
STUDIES TO COME
   Latinos in the United States
   Economic projection for California
   Youth pornography and the Internet
   Psychology of ineffective government
   Miority nurses feel professional barriers
Introduction to Studies in the News

Studies in the News is a very current compilation of items significant to the Legislature and Governor's Office. It is created weekly by the State Library's Research Bureau to supplement the public policy debate in California’s Capitol. To help share the latest information with state policymakers, these reading lists are now being made accessible through the State Library’s website. This week's list of current articles in various public policy areas is presented below.

Service to State Employees:

  • When available, the URL for the full text of each item is provided.

  • Items in the State Library collection can be checked out to state officials and staff.

  • Access to all materials listed will be provided by the State Information Reference Center, either by e-mail to cslsirc@library.ca.gov or by calling 654-0261.

The following studies are currently on hand:

CALIFORNIA READER

CALIFORNIA READER

PPIC Statewide Survey of the Central Valley. By Mark Baldassare, Public Policy Institute of California. (The Institute, San Francisco, California) April 2002. 39 p.

Full Text at: www.ppic.org/publications/CalSurvey27/survey27.pdf

["Growth Tops List of Worries in the Valley: A poll also cites concerns about pollution and jobs.... The third Survey found that 33 percent of the 2,004 people polled earlier this month rated traffic congestion on major roads as a big problem, up from 23 percent three years ago.... In the greater Sacramento region, the concern about growth-related issues was even more pronounced than elsewhere in the 400-mile-long Valley that stretches from Redding to Bakersfield." Sacramento Bee (April 25, 2002) A3.]

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The CSUS Forecast of the Sacramento Region. By the California Institute for County Government. (The Institute, Sacramento, California) April 2002. 2 p.

Full Text at: cicg.org/forecast/April_2002_CSUS_Forecast.pdf

["Area Rebound Predicted; Housing Sales Called Economic Key: A sizzling housing market will fuel the Sacramento region's economic recovery in the coming year, a new report predicts. While far from robust, the region nontheless should outpace the Bay Area and the state with a steady 1 to 2 percent annual rate of growth in the next 12 months." Sacramento Bee (April 26, 2002) D1.]

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CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT

CRIME RATE

Crime 2001 in Selected California Jurisdictions, January through December. By California Office of the Attorney General. (The Office, Sacramento, California) 2002. 3 p.

Full Text at: ag.ca.gov/cjsc/publications/preliminarys/jd01/rpt.pdf

["For the second year in a row, crime rates rose throughout much of California last year as the number of homicides jumped by 9 percent.... Overall crime rose 5.8 percent during 2001.... In addition to the rising homicide rate, property crimes like burglary and car thefts were up 8.2 percent. Crime rose 3.5 percent in 2000 compared to 1999." San Francisco Chronicle (March 26, 2002) A16.]

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CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM

People v. Willis. California Supreme Court. S096349. April 4, 2002. Various pagings.

["The California Supreme Court has made a major departure from its 1978 doctrine on how to combat the racial stacking of juries. The court said that jury selection does not need to begin anew once a judge believes either a prosecutor or a defense attorney is trying to stack the jury in a criminal case.... In 1978, the justices were the nation's first court to outlaw attempts by lawyers to remove prospective jurors from a panel because of their race. Other courts adopted that rule, including the U.S. Supreme Court." Oakland Tribune (April 5, 2002) 1.]

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MENTAL ILLNESS

Implementation of Washington’s Dangerous Mentally Ill Offender Law: Preliminary Findings. By Polly Phipps, Washington State Institute for Public Policy and Gregg J. Gagliardi, Washington Institute for Mental Illness Research and Training. Document No. 02-03-1901. (The Washington State Institute for Public Policy, Olympia, Washington) March 2002. 81 p.

Full Text at: www.wsipp.wa.gov/MentalIllness/pdf/Implement_DMIO_Law.pdf

["This report provides a description of the research completed and focuses on the implementation of the Act in substantial detail. We assess how the process of defining, identifying, and selecting Dangerous Mentally Ill Offenders (DMIOs) has been carried out, and we describe the treatment and services provided to an early group of released DMIOs.]

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VIDEO SURVEILLANCE

Public and Private Applications of Video Surveillance and Biometric Technologies. By Marcus Nieto and others, California Research Bureau, California State Library. (The Bureau, Sacramento, California) March 2002. 67 p.

Full Text at: www.library.ca.gov/crb/02/06/02-006.pdf

["This report provides an overview of closed circuit television (CCTV) video surveillance and biometrics; the use of CCTV surveillance by U.S. law enforcement, cities, transit districts, public housing authorities and school districts; business and workplace applications of CCTV surveillance." State Net (April 18, 2002) 4.]

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CULTURE AND SOCIETY

CULTURAL POLICY

National Investment in the Arts. By Bruce A. Seaman, Georgia State University. (Center for Arts and Culture, Washington, DC) [March 2002]. 37 p.

Full Text at: www.culturalpolicy.org/pdf/investment.pdf

["This issue paper looks at the ways in which the public sector supports the arts in America through direct grantmaking, tax policies, and other public policies.... State and local governments have quietly but dramatically demonstrated apparent voter support for the concept of public arts funding by providing more than 10 times the funding of the National Endowment for the Arts to their state arts councils and local arts agencies."]

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Aggravating Circumstances: A Status Report on Rudeness in America. By Steve Farkas, Public Agenda, and others. Prepared for the Pew Charitable Trust. (Public Agenda, New York, New York) 2002. 59 p.

["Land of the Mean, Home of the Rage: Americans think country is getting ruder. Sixty percent of drivers say they often encounter other motorists who are reckless or intimidating. Half of us are regularly forced to listen to people carrying on cell phone conversations in public places. 73 percent of the respondents believe Americans treated each other with greater respect in the past. These are some of the findings of a nationwide survey." San Francisco Chronicle (April 3, 2002) A2.]

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DISABILITIES

A Matter of Dignity: Changing the World of the Disabled. By Andrew Potok (Bantam Books, New York, New York) February 2002. 306 p.

["The gaps between the disabled and nondisabled in income, employment, education, political participation and community life are formidable, and to level the playing field will require equal access and thus equal opportunity.... For all that has been accomplished in law, in the academy, in technology, in social-policy thinking, it's essential to protect those hard-won gains and to consider them as only a beginning." NOTE: A Matter of Dignity ... is available for 3-day loan.]

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DEMOGRAPHY

OLDER AMERICANS

Preparing for an Aging World: The Case for Cross-National Research. By the Panel on a Research Agenda and New Data for an Aging World, National Research Council. (National Academy Press, Washington, DC) 328 p.

Full Text at: www.nap.edu/books/0309074215/html/index.html

["A panel of experts examines the issues surrounding global aging and their implications for policy and research. The report rejects alarmist as well as complacent views of global aging.... The number of elderly is now increasing by 8 million per year; by 2030, this increase will reach 24 million per year.... Nations need to act promptly to develop strategies for generating policy relevant information to guide policymaking and to avoid the potential for a global 'aging' crisis." Population Matters Policy Brief (2001.) 1.]

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TECHNOLOGY

Getting Serious Online. By John B. Horrigan and Lee Rainie, Pew Internet and American Life Project. (The Project, Washington, DC) March 2002. 26 p.

Full Text at: www.pewinternet.org/reports/pdfs/PIP_Getting_Serious_Online3ng.pdf

["Americans Increasingly Use Internet to Conduct Research for Their Jobs, Make Transactions and Share Worries, Seek Advice Through Emails: In a separate survey in January 2002, we found that 55 million Americans now go online from work, up from 43 million in March 2000.... By March 2001, 51 million Americans had Emailed family members for advice, up from 30 million in 2000 -- a 70 percent increase in a year." AScribe Newswire (February 20, 2002) 1.]

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ECONOMY

BANKING

Banking on Multinationals: Increased Competition from Large Foreign Lenders Threatens Domestic Banks, Raises Financial Instability. By Christian E. Weller and Adam S. Hersh, Economic Policy Institute. Issue Brief No. 178. (The Institute, Washington, DC) April 16, 2002. 7 p.

Full Text at: www.epinet.org/Issuebriefs/ib178/ib178.pdf

["Existing evidence does not tend to support the hope that increased competition from Multinational Banks will make domestic banks more efficient or banking systems more stable.... Research shows that increased foreign competition lowers the supply of credit -- especially to business start-ups, small- and medium-size enterprises, and low- and middle-income consumers -- and increases the possibility for financial instability."]

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DEFENSE CUTS & MILITARY BASE CLOSURES

Military Base Closures: Progress in Completing Actions from Prior Realignments and Closures. By the General Accounting Office. Prepared for Vic Snyder, U.S. House of Representatives. GAO-02-433. (The Office, Washington, DC) April 2002. 67 p.

Full Text at: www.gao.gov/cgi-bin/getrpt?GAO-02-433

["Base closures have saved the military about $16.7 billion already and are expected to generate more than $6 billion a year in future savings.... The net savings accrued from the first four rounds of military base closures ... even taking into account the costs of environmental cleanups." Sacramento Bee (April 6, 2002) A19.]

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GAMBLING

Card Clubs in California: A Review of Ownership Limitations. By the Little Hoover Commission, State of California. (The Commission, Sacramento, California) April 2002. 30 p.

Full Text at: www.lhc.ca.gov/lhcdir/163/report163.pdf

["Repeal Ban on Publicly Traded Ownership of Cardrooms, State Panel Says: A respected state commission recommended the repeal of a long-standing ban on corporate ownership of California cardrooms.... The Commission said the state's historic restraints on who may invest in cardrooms are no longer justified or necessary to protect the public.... Cardroom owners want the ability to seek outside investment capital to compete with thriving Indian casinos that are pushing ever closer to metropolitan areas." Copley News Service (April 29, 2002) 1.]

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INCOME INEQUALITY

Pulling Apart: A State–by-State Analysis of Income Trends. By Jared Bernstein and others. Center on Budget and Policy Priorities and the Economic Policy Institute. (The Center, Washington, DC) April 2002. 85 p.

Full Text at: www.cbpp.org/4-23-02sfp.pdf

[“The growth in income inequality over the last several decades was particularly pronounced in a handful of states, including New York and California, while the gap between rich and poor narrowed in only one, Alaska.... Using Census Bureau data, the [report]… looked at household incomes at the peak of each of the last three economic cycles – in the late 1970’s the late 80’s and the late 90’s – and found that gains in the top 20 percent of families during those periods outstripped those in the bottom 20 percent in 44 states.” The New York Times (April 24, 2002) 1.]

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EDUCATION

ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE

Rankings and Estimates: Rankings of the States 2001 and Estimates of School Statistics 2002. By National Education Association. (The Association, Annapolis Junction, Maryland) 2002. 123 p.

Full Text at: www.nea.org/publiced/edstats/rankings/02rankings.pdf

["The data presented in this combined report -- Rankings & Estimates -- provide facts about the extent to which local, state, and national governments commit resources to public education. .... NEA offers this report to its state and local affiliates as well as to researchers, policymakers, and the public as a tool to examine public education programs and services."]

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ACCOUNTABILITY

The Cost of Accountability. By Caroline M. Hoxby, Department of Economics, Harvard University. Prepared for the National Bureau of Economic Research. Working Paper 8855. (The Bureau, Cambridge, Massachusetts) April 2002. 25 p.

Full Text at: www.nber.org/papers/w8855

["Opponents of school accountability mount arguments on two fronts: poor quality of tests and the expense of accountability.... This paper focuses on the second issue ... its expense.... Facts are the best answer to questions about costs, so this paper presents the facts.... The costs of accountability programs are so small that even the most generous accounting could not make them appear large, relative to the cost of other education programs."]

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AFTER SCHOOL PROGRAMS

Moving an Out-of-School Agenda: Lessons and Challenges Across Cities. By Joel Tolman and others, Forum for Youth Investment. (The Forum, Takoma Park, Maryland) April 2002. 48 p.

Full Text at: www.forumforyouthinvestment.org/grasp/movingosagenda.pdf

["Many communities are finding more and better ways to provide out-of-school opportunities for their youth, but this Forum for Youth Investment report based on in-depth work in Sacramento, Chicago, Little Rock and Kansas City finds that challenges remain. Opportunities are still in short supply, especially for older adolescents, and almost non-existent after age 18. Opportunities are uneven based on location or time of day, and while many providers offer well-balanced programs focusing on a range of outcomes, larger programs tend to be more narrow in focus." Connect for Kids (May 6, 2002)[online].]

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CALIFORNIA

A Master Plan for California’s K-16 Schools. By EdSource, Inc. Edfact. (EdSource, Palo Alto, California) April 2002. 4 p.

Full Text at: www.edsource.org/pdf/EDFctMasterPlan_Final.pdf

["EdSource has been following the work of the Joint Committee to Develop a Master Plan -- Kindergarten through University and has reported its progress in two previous EdFacts. This update offers a glimpse at some of the key recommendations, describes what comes next in the process of creating a Master Plan, and explains how the public can participate."]

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HIGHER EDUCATION

Losing Ground. By the National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education. (The Center, San Jose) May 2, 2000. 32 p.

Full Text at: www.highereducation.org/reports/losing_ground/affordability_report_final_bw.pdf

["The organization found that the cost of a college education from a public institution in the state was more affordable than anywhere else in the country.... Over the past ten years in California, the authors found that tuition at public two-year institutions increased 24% (from $265 to $330), while tuition at public four-year institutions increased 2% (from $1,858 to $1,897), and tuition at private four-year institutions increased 18% (from $15,301 to $18,091). The percentage increases in most states' public and private institutions' tuition rates were considerably higher." California Capitol Hill Bulletin (May 2, 2002) 4.]

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SCHOOL READINESS

School Readiness Working Group: Final Report. Finance & Facilities Working Group -- Postsecondary Education: Final Report. And Finance & Facilities Working Group -- K-12 Education: Final Report. By the Joint Committee to Develop a Master Plan for Education -- Kindergarten through University. 1131-S; 1132-S; 1133-S. (The Committee, Sacramento, California) February - March 2002. Various pagings.

["The Group proposes a set of programs and services ... that are sufficiently powerful and accessible to improve school readiness and performance. The long-term goal is to reverse a widespread pattern of underachievement in California schools .... [Includes] recommendations aimed at creating the framework needed to deliver those services, raise quality, ensure equity, and create accountability."]

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EMPLOYMENT

AFRICAN AMERICANS

Left Behind in the Labor Market: Recent Employment Trends Among Young Black Men. By Paul Offner and Harry Holzer, Georgetown Public Policy Institute. Center on Urban and Metropolitan Policy, The Brookings Institution. (The Institution, Washington, DC) April 2002. 9 p.

Full Text at: www.brookings.edu/dybdocroot/es/urban/publications/offnerholzer.pdf

["This study finds that in contrast to their female counterparts, a significantly smaller proportion of young black men with no more than a high school education are working today than 20 years ago. In particular, central cities, and older industrial metro areas like Buffalo, Pittsburgh and St. Louis, appear to offer this group more limited employment prospects than the rest of the nation. The authors conclude with recommendations for how welfare policy could help disadvantaged young fathers succeed in the labor market and contribute to the well-being of young mothers and their children." Electronic Policy Network, (April 3, 2002)[online].]

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EMPLOYMENT STATISTICS

Part-Time and Seasonal Employment in Nonagricultural Industries: California, 2000. By Paul Wessen, Current Economic Statistics Group, California Employment Development Department. California Labor Market Trends. Vol. 2, No. 1. (The Department, Sacramento, California) March 2002. 18 p.

Full Text at: www.calmis.ca.gov/SpecialReports/PT-Seasonal-Emp-2000.pdf

["The current report examines the wages of a large sample of California workers of all ages and income levels.... Our results confirm that, when based on a cross-sectional analysis, real earnings have declined for the California workforce as a whole.... Consistent with recent research at the national level, our findings indicate that more workers in retail, agriculture and construction are remaining employed in these low-skill, low-wage sectors over time, suggesting a growing concentration of workers in low-wage industries in California."]

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ENERGY

ELECTRICITY INDUSTRY

In re Pacific Gas and Electric Company. United States Bankruptcy Court, San Francisco Division. 01-30923. California Public Utilities Commission's Plan of Reorganization Under Chapter 11 of the Bankruptcy Code for Pacific Gas and Electric Company. April 15, 2002. 77 p.

Full Text at: ftp://ftp.cpuc.ca.gov/gopher-data/pge_bankruptcy/Plan_of_Reorganization.pdf

["State utility regulators offered their alternative plan for resuscitating Pacific Gas and Electric Co. yesterday, proposing a new stock sale and insisting the company could be brought out of bankruptcy without a rate increase or a loss of state oversight....The competing plans are likely to be sent to creditors for a vote in mid-June, after final review by a bankruptcy judge and the completion of court-ordered mediation." San Francisco Chronicle (April 16, 2002) B1.]

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California v. Mirant Corporation, et al.; California v. Williams Marketing and Trading Co; California v. Powerex Corp.; California v. Coral Power, LLC. San Francisco Superior Court. CGC-02-406461; CGC-02-406459; CGC-02-406464; Complaint for Civil Penalties. April 9, 2002.

["Continuing a legal assault that may prompt California judges to sort out who was responsible for the state's energy debacle, Attorney General Bill Lockyer sued four power companies for allegedly gouging consumers and flouting federal energy rules....The lawsuits allege that companies charged rates that were well above a fair price for power from early 2000 through 2001. Lockyer's attorneys used formulas designed by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission that determine just prices and found hundreds of thousands of transactions that exceeded those prices." San Francisco Chronicle (April 10, 2002) A26.]

Mirant. 11 p.
http://caag.state.ca.us/newsalerts/2002/02-036mirantcomplaint.pdf

Williams. 10 p.
http://caag.state.ca.us/newsalerts/2002/02-036williamscomplaint.pdf

Powerex. 9 p.
http://caag.state.ca.us/newsalerts/2002/02-036powerexcomplaint.pdf

Coral Power. 9 p.
http://caag.state.ca.us/newsalerts/2002/02-036coralcomplaint.pdf

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California's Electricity Crisis: A Postmortem. By Paul L. Joskow. IN: The Milken Institute Review: A Journal of Economic Policy, vol. 4, no. 2 (Second Quarter 2002) pp. 33-44.

Full Text at: www.milkeninstitute.org/review/2002qtr2/2002qtr2.pdf

["Even if California's wholesale market had been perfectly competitive, wholesale spot prices would have risen in the spring and summer of 2000. But there is abundant evidence that during high demand periods, California's spot electricity markets were far from competitive.... Several studies have demonstrated that what economists euphemistically call 'strategic behavior' by suppliers led to significant increases in wholesale prices."]

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Foundation for Taxpayer and Consumer Rights v. California Public Utilities Commission et al. California Supreme Court. Petition for Writ of Mandamus. April 11, 2002 43 p.

Full Text at: www.consumerwatchdog.org/utilities/rp/rp002364.pdf

["A consumer group asked the California Supreme Court to declare that state regulators violated the law when they entered into a settlement with Southern California Edison and proposed a reorganization plan for Pacific Gas & Electric Co.... The foundation's lawsuit asks the Supreme Court to declare the PUC's actions illegal and to force the agency to heed a state constitutional provision that requires state agencies to obey state laws.... The high court could hear the suit, reject it or send it to a state appellate court." Los Angeles Times (April2, 2002) 8.]

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California v. Reliant Energy Inc. et al., and California v. Mirant Corporation, et al. United States Distric Court, Northern District of California. C-02-1788 and C-02-1787.Complaint for Illegal Aquisition and/or Holding of Assests. April 15, 2002.

["Attorney General Bill Lockyer sued two electricity companies, alleging that they exert illegal control of California's electricity market and should be forced to sell power plants.... He accuses the companies of violating federal antitrust laws, stifling competition and illegally driving up prices." Los Angeles Times (April 16, 2002) 7.] SD

Reliant. 12 p.
http://caag.state.ca.us/newsalerts/2002/02-039energyantitrustRELIANT.pdf

Mirant. 11 p.
http://caag.state.ca.us/newsalerts/2002/02-039energyantitrustMIRANT.pdf

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ENVIRONMENT & NATURAL RESOURCES

BIODIVERSITY

States of the Union: Ranking America's Biodiversity. By Bruce A. Stein, NatureServe. Prepared for The Nature Conservancy. (The Conservancy, Arlington, Virginia) April 2002. 25 p.

Full Text at: nature.org/earthday/files/states_of_the_union_report.pdf

["Almost one quarter of U.S. states are facing the possibility of losing at least 10 percent of their native species, finds a new report....The report ranks all 50 states and the District of Columbia on several key biological characteristics including diversity of species, distinctiveness of the animals and plants, levels of rarity and risk, and species already lost to extinction.....California ranks in the top five in each category." Environmental News Service (April 23, 2002) 1.]

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OPEN SPACE

Open Space Protection: Conservation Meets Growth Management. By Linda E. Hollis and William Fulton, Solimar Research Group, Inc. Prepared for the Brookings Institution Center on Urban and Metropolitan Policy. (The Institution, Washington, DC) April 2002. 91 p.

Full Text at: www.brookings.edu/dybdocroot/es/urban/publications/hollisfultonopenspace.pdf

["The link between open space policies and growth management is becoming clearer than ever before. However, the impact of open space preservation on metropolitan development patterns is not yet well understood.... This paper provides an overview of the nature, quantity and objectives of open space programs in the U.S."]

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WATER SUPPLY

"Water Warning Comes From Farmers." By Gig Conaughton. IN: North County Times (April 21, 2002) A1.

Full Text at: www.nctimes.net/news/2002/20020421/11111.html

["California is allowed 4.4 million acre-feet of Colorado River water each year under the Colorado River Compact of 1922, but has taken up to 5.2 million acre-feet each year, giving the state a reputation for being a 'water hog.' California is battling over ways to substitute Colorado River water by proposing transfers between the Imperial Valley and San Diego County.... Environmentalists are challenging the proposed water transfer because of direct impacts on the Salton Sea." California Policy Forum NewsWire (April 23,2002) 1.]

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GENERAL GOVERNMENT

LOCAL GOVERNMENT

"Grading the Counties: A Management Report Card." "How We Grade Them." And "Management Matters and Performance Counts." By Katherine Barrett and others. The Government Performance Project. IN: Governing (February 2002) pp. 20-89.

Full Text at: www.governing.com/gpp/gp2intro.htm

["The nine most populous counties didn't fare particularly well in a Governing magazine survey of 40 large county governments across the nation.... Just three of the nine -- Contra Costa, Orange and San Diego -- scored overall 'B' grades while the other six garnered just 'Cs'. As Governing points out, one problem that faces all counties is that they are 'invisible government,' whose many and often contradictory functions confuse voters and taxpayers." Sacramento Bee (February 25, 2001) A3.]

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Management Matters and Performance Counts: County Grade Report 2002. By the Government Performance Project. (The Maxwell School, Campbell Public Affairs Institute, Syracuse, New York) February 2002. Various pagings.

Full Text at: www.maxwell.syr.edu/gpp/County's_2002/county_main_page.htm

["During 2001, the Government Performance Project (GPP) examined government management capacity for 40 of the nation's largest counties.... The results of the assessment of county management systems reveal that counties provide an array of services to citizens, but often lack the power to address all their problems."

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STATE OVERSIGHT

Program Evaluation in the States. By Robert D. Boerner, National Conference of State Legislatures. Legisbrief. Vol. 10, No. 24. (NCSL, Denver, Colorado) April/May 2002. 2 p.

["Many states have created oversight offices to provide accurate, independent, objective and timely evaluations.... More than 40 states have program evaluation offices.... They conduct in-depth analyses that legislators have not received from executive branch sources.... Typically, the state legislature plays a central role in decisions about which agencies will be evaluated."]

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STATE TAXES

State Income Tax Burdens on Low-Income Families in 2001. By Nicholas Johnson and others, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. (The Center, Washington, DC) February 26, 2002. 18 p.

Full Text at: www.cbpp.org/2-26-02sfp.pdf

["State Fiscal Update: Tax Systems More Regressive, New Cuts Jeopardize Aid to Those Hit by Recession: The report reviews what has happened over the past decade in response to the recession.... The types of tax cuts ... left state tax systems less progressive, with lower-income families bearing higher tax burdens. This trend has implications for actions states now are taking." U.S. Newswire (January 11, 2002) 1.]

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HEALTH

ALCOHOL & DRUG USE

"The Economics of Alcohol Abuse and Alcohol Control Policies." By Philip J. Cook and Michael J. Moore. IN: Health Affairs, vol. 21, no. 2 (March/April 2002) 12 p.

["Economic research has contributed to the evaluation of alcohol policy through empirical analysis of the effects of alcohol-control measures on alcohol consumption and its consequences.... Consumers tend to drink less ... and have fewer alcohol-related problems when alcoholic beverage prices are increased or availability is restricted.... Excise taxes on alcoholic beverages are effective measures that can be used to promote public health."]

[Request #S4898]

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DISABILITIES

Long-Term Care and the U.S. Supreme Court's Olmstead Decision. By Johanna M. Donlin, National Conference of State Legislatures. NCSL State Legislative Report. Vol. 27, No. 7. (NCSL, Denver, Colorado) March 2002. 12 p.

["The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has taken the lead in working with states to implement the Olmstead decision. Various agencies have provided technical assistance and financial support to help states assess their long-term care systems and how Olmstead vs. L.C. may change their current methods of delivering long-term care services."]

[Request #S4899]

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"Along the Disability Divide." By Darby Patterson. IN: Electronic Government, vol 3, no. 1 (Spring 2002) pp. 8-13.

["Section 508 [of the Federal Acquisition Regulations]directs all federal agencies to purchase information technology that is accessible to persons with disabilities.... These technologies enable people with a wide range of disabilities to enjoy access to the electronic world. They include screen readers, Braille readers, special keyboards and other tools.... The possibility that the requirements could eventually apply to state and local governments ... [aroused] concerns about the costs of implementing such a program."

[Request #S4900]

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OBESITY

"Weighty Issues: States Search for Strategies to Curb Childhood Obesity." IN: State Health Notes, vol. 23, no. 370 (April 22, 2002) pp. 1, 5-6.

["The face of America's obesity epidemic is becoming ever more youthful. Since 1980, according to the U.S. Surgeon General, the incidence of overweight among adolescents has tripled.... Alarmed by the trend, states are searching for ways to encourage children to get more exercise and to cut down on the sodas and chips."]

[Request #S4901]

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SUBSTANCE ABUSE

Substance Abuse Treatment and Diversion Programs. By the Forum for State Health Policy Leadership, National Conference of State Legislatures. State Health Lawmakers' Digest. Vol. 2, No. 2. (NCSL, Denver, Colorado) Winter 2002. 6 p.

["Although only a few states have experience to date with diversion programs, preliminary results and projections indicate that they offer an alternative to states that can produce significant fiscal savings. More states may begin to look at diversion programs as a potential tactic for easing the strain on state budgets."]

[Request #S4915]

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HOUSING

AFFORDABLE HOUSING

Increasing Access to Housing for Low-Income Families. By Courtney Smith, Center for Best Practices, National Governor's Association. (The Association, Washington, DC) March 29, 2002). 10 p.

Full Text at: www.nga.org/cda/files/032902HOUSING.pdf

["A report from the National Governors Association finds that although much of the funding for affordable housing activities comes from the federal government, federal investment has fallen over recent decades. States recognize that the growing unmet need for affordable housing as a barrier to moving people from welfare to work and out of poverty, and as a significant obstacle to local economic growth. In response, states are developing new programs to address the affordable housing crisis." HandsNet (April 29, 2002)[online].]

[Request #S4902]

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SENIOR HOUSING

Adding Assisted Living Services to Subsidized Housing: Serving Frail Older Persons with Low Incomes. By Robert Wilden and Donald L. Redfoot, AARP Public Policy Institute. (The Institute, Washington, DC) January 2002. 85 p.

Full Text at: research.aarp.org/il/2002_01_living.pdf

["This study examines research on the potential demand for assisted living services in subsidized housing and reports on case studies of subsidized housing projects that have developed assisted living programs. The case studies in this report demonstrate that assisted living services can be successfully integrated into subsidized housing projects for older persons although funding for services and training and coordination of housing and services staff can be difficult issues."]

[Request #S4903]

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HUMAN SERVICES

CHILD CARE

Caring for Our Children: National Health and Safety Performance Standards: Guidelines for Out-of-Home Child Care. By the American Academy of Pediatrics, and others. (The Center, Aurora, Colorado) 2002. 538 p.

Full Text at: nrc.uchsc.edu/CFOC/PDFVersion/National%20Health%20and%20Safety%20Performance%20Standards.pdf

["10 technical panels focused on their particular subject matter areas, after which time their recommendations were merged into a single set of recommended standards and widely reviewed by representatives of all stakeholders with an interest in child care, including parents."]

[Request #S4904]

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CHILDREN

Welfare Policies Matter for Children and Youth: Lessons for TANF Reauthorization. By Pamela Morris and others, Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation. (The Corporation, New York, New York) March 2002. 14 p.

Full Text at: www.mdrc.org/Reports2002/NG_PolicyBrief/NG_PolicyBrief.htm

["This policy brief deepens our understanding of how changes in welfare policies affect the well-being of elementary school-age and adolescent children by showing how reforms targeted at parents can have important consequences for their children.... Findings reported here demonstrate that welfare policies that aim to improve the economic security of families can give children a better start in their education."]

[Request #S4905]

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Trends in the Well-Being of America's Children and Youth 2001. By Babette Gutmann and Jennifer Hamilton, Westat. (Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Washington, DC) 2002. 14p.

Full Text at: aspe.hhs.gov/hsp/01trends/intro.pdf

["The 6th edition of this report presents the most recent and reliable estimates on more than 80 indicators of well-being. It is intended to provide the policy community, the media, and all interested citizens with an accessible overview of data describing the condition of children in the United States. The indicators have been organized into five broad areas: Population, family, and neighborhood; Economic security; Health conditions and health care; Social development and behavioral health; and Education and achievement." HandsNet (May 3, 2002)[online].]

[Request #S4906]

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IMMIGRATION

California's Immigrant Households and Public Assistance Participation in the 1990s. By Henry E. Brady and others, California Policy Research Center, University of California. CPRC Brief. Vol. 14, No. 2. (The Center, Berkeley, California) January 2002. 4 p.

Full Text at: www.ucop.edu/cprc/immigpabrf.pdf

["We are conducting a three-year study that addresses public-policy concerns regarding the impact of welfare reforms on California immigrants.... In this Brief ... we examine how changes in welfare rules and/or perceptions of those rules affected California immigrant-household pulblic-assistnace participation in the 1990s."]

[Request #S4907]

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WELFARE REFORM

State Policy Choices Under Welfare Reform. By Thomas Gais and R. Kent Weaver, Welfare Reform and Beyond, the Brookings Institution. Policy Brief No. 21. (The Institution, Washington, DC) Spring 2002. 8 p.

Full Text at: www.brookings.edu/dybdocroot/wrb/publications/pb/pb21.pdf

["The package of policy choices vary widely across states. States that receive higher block grants per low-income child are more likely to pursue generous income supplementation policies, while the political characteristics of a state are more closely related to policies intended to restrict access to TANF. There is little evidence thus far of an overall 'race to the bottom' in TANF policies."]

[Request #S4908]

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Welfare Reform and American Indian Tribes: Critical Decisions for the Future of Indian Families. By Jo Anne Kauffman, Kauffman and Associates, Inc. Prepared for the Henry J. Kaiser Foundation. (The Foundation, Menlo Park, California) 2002. 59 p.

Full Text at: www.kff.org/content/2002/20020415/6024.pdf

["This Kaiser Family Foundation report explores the experiences of eight tribes in Arizona, Oregon and Wisconsin that are approaching welfare reform in different ways. TANF, which expires in September of this year, provides cash assistance to poor families with children, including poor American Indian Families, and gives tribes the option to design and administer their own family assistance programs following approval of the plan by the Department of Health and Human Services."]

[Request #S4909]

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New Lives for Poor Families: Mothers and Young Children Move Through Welfare Reform: Technical Report. By Bruce Fuller, University of California, Berkeley, and others. And The Growing Up in Poverty Project - Wave 2 Findings: California, Connecticut, and Florida. By Policy Analysis for Policy Education (PACE, Berkeley, California) April 2002. 102 p.

Full Text at: pace.berkeley.edu/gup_tech_rpt.pdf

["Mothers moving from welfare to work have increased their incomes, but have seen few improvements in their daily lives, according to a study.... The study found that in the five years since cash-for-work policies were implemented, welfare rolls in those states have been cut in half, but one in six mothers still visits food banks to get by." San Jose Mercury News (April 16, 2002) A13.]

[Request #S4923]

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INTERNATIONAL READER

Building Institutions for Markets: World Development Report 2002. By the World Bank. (Oxford University Press, New York, New York) [March] 2002. Various pagings.

Full Text at: www.worldbank.org/wdr/2001/fulltext/fulltext2002.htm

["This report is about building market institutions that promote growth and reduce poverty.... It looks at the roles of private and public, and national, local, and international actors. It draws on a wealth of research and practical experience from inside and outside the Bank, as well as on insights from many disciplines, presenting new research and data on institutions."]

[Request #S4910]

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Milken Institute 2002 Global Conference: Briefing Book. By the Milken Institute. (The Institute, Santa Monica, California) April 2002. Various pagings.

["The fifth annual event, whose theme is 'Building Prosperity in an Interdependent World,' will bring together economists, academics, executives, financiers and others to discuss public policy, social issues and economic trends." Los Angeles Times (April 22, 2002) 2. NOTE: Milken Institute 2002 ... will be available for 3-day loan.]

[Request #S4911]

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NATIONAL READER

NATIONAL READER

"Science and Technology: Public Attitudes and Public Understanding: Public Attitudes Toward S&T, Scientific Research, and Specific Science-Related Issues. By the National Science Board Subcommittee on Science & Engineering Indicators - 2002. IN: Science and Engineering Indicators 2002 (April 2002) [online.]

Full Text at: www.nsf.gov/sbe/srs/seind02/c7/c7h.htm

["Many Americans Lack Knowledge of Elementary Science, Poll Finds: Few Americans understand the scientific process, and many believe in mysterious psychic powers, according to a national survey.... Seventy-seven percent of those surveyed believe in the theory of global warming: that the planet is being heated by an excess of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.... 86 percent said global warming is a serious or 'somewhat serious' problem." Columbus Dispatch (May 5, 2002) 7B.]

[Request #S4912]

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TRANSPORTATION

AUTOMOBILE SAFETY

Along for the Ride: Reducing Driver Distractions: Final Report. By the Driver Focus and Technology Forum, National Conference of State Legislatures. (NCSL, Denver, Colorado) March 2002. 110 p.

["This report details 14 principles developed by legislators, staff, safety groups, researchers, government agencies and industry representatives. It also provides comprehensive background information from leading experts about such issues as emergency response, safety or telecommunications systems in cars, driver education programs and a variety of other pertinent topics."]

[Request #S4913]

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CALIFORNIA

School Bus Safety II: State Law Intended to Make School Bus Transportation Safer is Costing More Than Expected. By the California State Auditor, Bureau of State Audits. 2001-120. (The Bureau, Sacramento, California) March 2002. 71 p.

Full Text at: www.bsa.ca.gov/bsa/pdfs/2001120.pdf

["Surprising Costs for Bus Safety Plan; State Auditor Cites Lack of Clear Rules: A school bus safety program projected to cost no more than $1 million each year is instead costing California $67 million annually, according to a new audit. Auditors found most school districts they sampled lacked sufficient data to back up their reimbursement claims." San Jose Mercury News (March 30, 2002) A17.]

[Request #S4914]

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WASHINGTON READER

California Capitol Hill Bulletin. By the California Institute for Federal Policy Research. Vol.9, Bulletin 12 (The Institute, Washington, DC) May 2, 2002. 9 p.

Full Text at: www.calinst.org/bulletins/bull912.pdf

[Includes: "Senate Considering Trade Promotions;" "Californians Seek Disaster Aid for Almond Growers Hit by Freeze;" "House Moves Highway and Transit Funding Restoration Plan;" and others.]

[Request #S4916]

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STUDIES TO COME
[The following studies, reports, and documents have been ordered or requested, but have not yet arrived. Requests may be placed, and copies will be provided when the material arrives.]

CULTURE AND SOCIETY

LATINOS

Latinos: Remaking America. By Marcelo M. Suarez-Orozco and Mariela M. Paez. University of California Press (The University,Berkeley, California) June 2002. 502 p.

["Children who speak only Spanish in the home until age 5 are, at age 10, just as proficient in English and better in Spanish than children introduced to English before age 2, according to a report." San Francisco Chronicle, May 3, 2002 A4. NOTE: Latinos ... will be available for 3-day loan.]

[Request #S4917]

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ECONOMY

CALIFORNIA

California Economic Growth. By the Center for Continuing Study of the California Economy. (The Center, Palo Alto, California) April 2002.

["Propelled by its dominance in technology and other fast-growing sectors, California will bounce back from recession, gaining jobs and income at a faster pace than the rest of the nation over the next eight years, a research group predicts in a study....The tech-dependent Bay Area is likely to do well even though technology is still mired in a painful downturn. Among the state's major metropolitan areas, San Diego and Sacramento are expected to fare even better. Los Angeles will lag, while still beating the national growth rate by a wide margin." San Francisco Chronicle (April 22, 2002) E1. NOTE: California Economic Growth ... will be available for 3-day loan.]

[Request #S4874]

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INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

Youth, Pornography, and the Internet. Edited by Dick Thornburgh and Herbert S. Lin, Committee to Study Tools and Strategies for Protecting Kids from Pornography and Their Applicability to Other Inappropriate Internet Content, National Research Council. (The Council, Washington, DC) [May] 2002. 420 p.

Full Text at: bob.nap.edu/html/youth_internet/

["No Easy Fixes Are Seen to Curb Sex-Site Access: The report ... concluded that neither tougher laws nor new technology alone can solve the problem.... 'No single approach -- technical, legal, economic or educational -- will be sufficient,' wrote the authors.... 'Rather, an effective framework for protecting our children from inappropriate materials and experiences on the Internet will require a balanced composite of all of these elements.'" New York Times (May 3, 2002) 1.]

[Request #S4918]

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GENERAL GOVERNMENT

GOVERNMENT PRODUCTIVITY

You Can't Enlarge The Pie: The Psychology of Ineffective Government. By Max H. Bazerman, Harvard Business School, and others. (Basic Books, New York, New York) 2001. 262 p.

["The authors cover an enormous amount of territory. Early chapters examine everything from the problem of developing new vaccines (in the face of lawsuits over rare side effects) to environmental disputes involving the Endangered Species Act. [They] provide several useful examples of what they call 'dysfunctional competition,'including what they view as unproductive bidding wars between cities trying to attract major-league sports teams." National Journal (February 9, 2002) 1.]

[Request #S4920]

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HEALTH

NURSES

Minority Nurses in the New Century: Characteristics and Workforce Utilization Patterns: A Survey. (American Nurses Publishing, Washington, DC) 2002.

[“A new survey about minority nurses shows that many of these nurses believe there are personal and professional barriers to their progress and that they have been denied promotions because of race…. Such problems make it harder to attract minorities to nursing, according to some minority nursing leaders.” Amednews.com (March 11, 2002) 1.]

[Request #S4921]

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HUMAN SERVICES

CHILD CARE

State Developments in Child Care, Early Education, and School-Age Care 2001. Children's Defense Fund (The Fund, Washington, DC) 2002.

["A new CDF report outlines what states did and did not do in 2001 to give children the strong start they need and help low-income families work.... Overall in 2001, states took some important steps toward improving the quality and affordability of child care for children and families, but there were significant setbacks as well." CDF Child Care Advocacy Newsletter (May 6, 2002) 1.]

[Request #S4922]

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