Subject: Studies in the News 02-40 (July 15, 2002)


CALIFORNIA RESEARCH BUREAU
CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY
Studies in the News
Children and Family Supplement


Contents This Week

Introductory Material CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT
   Violence against women
EDUCATION
   After-school choices
   Bilingual pupils
   Early childhood and education integration
   Revitalizing special education
HEALTH
   Financial insecurity and health services expenses
   Disabilities and income
   Developing minds
   Infant research
HUMAN SERVICES
   Financing strategies for family initiatives
   Kinship care
   Guide to child care financing
   Poor children in rural America
   Respite for families with children
   Early intervention for foster-care infants
   Using research to improve family services
   Repairing parent-child relationships
   Successful community initiatives
   Coordinated state policies for youth
STUDIES TO COME
   Measuring school equity
   Medical malpractice
   Race matters in health care
   AAA
Introduction to Studies in the News

Studies in the News is a very current compilation of items significant to the Legislature and Governor's Office. It is created weekly by the State Library's Research Bureau to supplement the public policy debate in California’s Capitol. To help share the latest information with state policymakers, these reading lists are now being made accessible through the State Library’s website. This week's list of current articles in various public policy areas is presented below.

Service to State Employees:

  • When available, the URL for the full text of each item is provided.

  • Items in the State Library collection can be checked out to state officials and staff.

  • Access to all materials listed will be provided by the State Information Reference Center, either by e-mail to cslsirc@library.ca.gov or by calling 654-0261.

The following studies are currently on hand:

CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT

WOMEN

Violence Against Women: Data on Pregnant Victims and Effectiveness of Prevention Strategies Are Limited. By the United States General Accounting Office. (The Office, Washington, DC) 2002. 33 p.

Full Text at: www.gao.gov/new.items/d02530.pdf

["This report discusses the availability of information on the prevalence and risk of violence against pregnant women and on the number of pregnant women who are victims of homicide. It also highlights strategies and programs that prevent violence against pregnant women."]

[Request #S5373]

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EDUCATION

AFTER SCHOOL PROGRAMS

Multiple Choices After School: Findings From the Extended-Service Schools Initiative. By Jean Baldwin Grossman and others, Public/Private Ventures and Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation. (The Corporation, New York, New York) June 2002. 84 p.

Full Text at: www.ppv.org/pdffiles/multi%A1choice_ess_full.pdf

["Working parents and teachers see after-school programs as an essential support for children as they grow and develop. Nearly 80 percent of parents surveyed said that after-school programs helped their children cope with behavioral problems and helped them obtain new skills to meet increased demands in school." HandsNet (June 28, 2002).]

[Request #S5374]

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BILINGUAL EDUCATION

Assessing the Needs of Bilingual Pupils: Living in Two Languages. By Deryn Hall and others. (David Fulton Publishers, London, England) 2001. 88 p.

[Includes: "The Identification and Assessment of Pupils Causing Concern"; "Problems of Standard Psychological Tests"; "Assessing Language Stages"; and others. NOTE: Assessing the Needs ... is available for 3-day loan.]

[Request #S5375]

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EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

"Integrating Early Childhood Into Education: The Case of Sweden." By Early Childhood and Family Education Section, UNESCO. IN: UNESCO Policy Briefs on Early Childhood, no. 3 (May 2002) 2 p.

Full Text at: www.unesco.org/education/educprog/ecf/pdf/brief3en.pdf

["This study reports mixed results with Sweden's transfer of governmental departmental responsibility for childcare from Health and Social Affairs to Education and Science. Some formalization in the pre-school classes has occurred, but not to the extent predicted by critics. An evaluation of teachers in the pre-school classes for 6-year olds revealed that these teachers organized their activities in a formal way, based on their notion of what formal schooling should look like. In some cases, their practices were found to be more rigid than that of the primary teachers. On the other hand, no such formalization has occurred in the pre-school programs serving 1-5-year olds. With the shift of 6-year olds into the Primary system, pre-schools, freed of responsibility for pre-primary education, have been able to concentrate on more developmentally-based approaches to education." Exchange Everyday (July 3, 2002).]

[Request #S5376]

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SPECIAL EDUCATION

A New Era: Revitalizing Special Education for Children and Their Families. By the President's Commission on Excellence in Special Education (PCESE). (The Commission, Washington, DC) July 2002. 89 p.

Full Text at: www.ed.gov/inits/commissionsboards/whspecialeducation/reports/pcesefinalreport.pdf

["The Commission was charged by the President to recommend reforms to improve America's special education system and move it from a culture of compliance to one of accountability for results. The Commission held 13 open hearings and meetings across the country. At those meetings and hearings, the members heard from 109 expert witnesses and more than 175 parents, teachers, students with disabilities, and members of the public, and were presented with letters, written statements, and research."]

[Request #S5377]

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HEALTH

ACCESS TO CARE

Family Out-of-Pocket Spending for Health Services: A Continuing Source of Financial Insecurity. By Mark Merlis. Publication No. 509. (The Commonwealth Fund, New York, New York) June 2002. 48 p.

Full Text at: www.cmwf.org/programs/insurance/merlis_oopspending_509.pdf

["This report examines trends over time and family health care expenditures compared to family income. Key findings include: one of six families (16%)--about 18 million nationally--spent more than 5 percent of their incomes on health care services in 1996 and seven percent of all families--8 million families--spent more than 10 percent. The report concludes with a discussion of ways public policy could promote adequate protection against high costs relative to income, including ways the current personal income tax code could be better targeted to reach those at greatest risk."]

[Request #S5378]

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DISABILITIES

Disabilities Among Children and Mothers in Low Income Families. By Sunhwa Lee and others, Institute for Women's Policy Research. IWPR Publication #D449. (The Institute, Washington, DC) June 20, 2002. 7 p.

Full Text at: www.iwpr.org/pdf/d449.pdf

["The findings in this study indicate that single mothers receiving TANF are more likely than other low-income mothers to have a child with a disability and are themselves more likely to have a disability. This high prevalence of disabilities underscores a need for careful assessment of disability status and accompanying difficulties among low income families."]

[Request #S5379]

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INFANTS

How the Child's Mind Develops. By David Cohen. (Routledge, New York, New York) 2002. 208 p.

[Includes: "The Logical Child: Piaget's Theory of Cognitive Development"; "Measuring Children's Cognitive Development"; "Television, Toys and the Child as Consumer"; and others. NOTE: How the Child's ... is available for 3-day loan.]

[Request #S5380]

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Progress in Infancy Research. By Jeffrey W. Fagen. (Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Mahway, New Jersey) 2002. 308 p.

[Includes: "Polygraphic Studies of the Newborn's Sucking and Heart Rate"; "Memory for Hidden Objects in Early Infancy: Behavior, Theory, and Neural Network Simulation"; "Categorization of Infant-Directed Speech"; and others. NOTE: Progress in Infancy ... is available for 3-day loan.]

[Request #S5381]

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HUMAN SERVICES

CHILD CARE

Thinking Broadly: Financing Strategies for Comprehensive Child and Family Initiatives. By Cheryl D. Hayes. The Finance Project. (The Project, Washington, DC) 2002. 58 p.

Full Text at: www.financeproject.org/newseries.htm

["This guide is intended to assist policymakers, community leaders and program developers by outlining an array of approaches to finance comprehensive community initiatives. It also provides considerations to help state and local leaders develop financing plans that closely align with their program goals, available resources, and the political and economic environments in which they work."]

[Request #S5382]

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Children Cared For By Relatives: What Services Do They Need? By Jennifer Ehrle and Rob Green, The Urban Institute. Series B, No. B-47. (The Institute, Washington, DC) June 2002. 8 p.

Full Text at: www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/310511_B47.pdf

["This brief looks at some of the specific service needs of children in kinship care. In this study nearly two-thirds (64 percent) of children in kinship care live in 'low- income' families.... Agencies that work with kinship caregivers may want to develop strategies to improve their access to available services, to expand existing services, and to develop new programs to address the needs of this group."}

[Request #S5383]

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Investing in Our Future: A Guide to Child Care Financing. By Louise Stoney and others, National Conference of State Legislatures. (NCSL, Denver, Colorado) June 2002. 77 p.

["Although financing strategies and approaches will vary from state to state, this book suggests several principles to help guide these decisions and offers a range of financing options that have been implemented in states and communities across the country. These principles include the importance of using multiple funding streams and developing policies and procedures that allow early care and education funds to be easily 'layered' within a single program." NOTE: Investing in our Future ... is available for 3-day loan.]

[Request #S5384]

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CHILDREN

America's Forgotten Children: Child Poverty in Rural America. By Wendy Nadel and others, Save the Children. (Save the Children, Westport, Connecticut) June 2002. Various Pagings.

Full Text at: www.savethechildren.org/afc/afc_pdf_02.shtml

["Scenes of poverty as devastating as in Third World Countries exist in our nation, including California's Central Valley. This report provides a picture of America's rural poor, and recommends ways to help -- investments to reverse the "brain drain" in rural communities, viable community institutions where kids can gather and families can get services, stronger work supports to help welfare families become self-sufficient, and targeting national and state resources to be sure they reach the children living rural poverty." Connect for Kids (June 24, 2002).]

[Request #S5385]

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FAMILIES

Planned and Crisis Respite for Families With Children: Results of a Collaborative Study. By Susan Dougherty and others, Child Welfare League of America, ARCH National Respite Network, and Casey Family Programs National Center for Resource Family Support. (Casey Family Programs, Washington, DC) 2002. 47 p.

Full Text at: www.casey.org/cnc/documents/respite_for_families_full.pdf

["Families caring for children with special needs and children in foster care need a break sometimes. This report surveyed agencies across the country to find out what respite services they provide and how support to families and caregivers can be expanded and enhanced." Connect for Kids (June 17, 2002).]

[Request #S5386]

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FOSTER CARE

"Attachment and Biobehavioral Catch-Up: The ABC's of Helping Infants in Foster Care Cope with Early Adversity." By Mary Dozier, University of Delaware, and others. IN: Zero to Three, vol. 22, no. 5 (April/May 2002) pp. 7-13.

["This article represents an overview of ten years of research on how children cope with disruptions in care. This article addresses the child's failure to elicit nurturance, caregiver discomfort in providing nurturance, and behavioral and biobehavioral dysregulation in children."]

[Request #S5387]

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RESEARCH

What works? Integrating Multiple Data Sources and Policy Research Methods in Assessing Need and Evaluating Outcomes in Community-Based Child and Family Service Systems (Dissertation). By Elan Melamid, RAND Graduate School. (RAND, Santa Monica, California) 2002. 150 p.

Full Text at: www.rand.org/publications/RGSD/RGSD161/RGSD161.pdf

["This research examines the roles that policy analysts and policy research may play in improving the effectiveness of systems of care serving at-risk children and their families. The author examines the roles that rigorous policy research can play in such contexts and the limitations and challenges of applying these new analytic techniques in public social service settings."]

[Request #S5388]

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"Treating Infant-Parent Relationships in the Context of Maltreatment: Repairing Ruptures of Trust." By Julie A. Larrieu, Institute of Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health and Tulane University Health Sciences Center. IN: Zero to Three, vol. 22, no. 5 (April/May 2002) pp. 16-22.

["This article examines the multilayered efforts needed to encourage positive changes in parent-child relationships, and complex systems of care. The author found that such intervention reduced a child's risk of subsequent maltreatment by 68%."]

[Request #S5389]

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SOCIAL POLICY

Solutions for America; What's Already Out There: A Sourcebook of Ideas from Successful Community Programs. By Suzanne W. Morse, the Pew Partnership for Civic Change, and Monica M. Gillespie. (The University of Richmond, Charlottesville, Virginia) 2002. 95 p.

Full Text at: www.pew-partnership.org/pdf/whatsAlreadyOutThere.pdf

["This guide summarizes a two-year research project ... highlighting 19 community initiatives providing hometown solutions to national problems ... in four broad areas: healthy families and children, thriving neighborhoods, living-wage jobs, and viable economies.... This resource provides a road map through the array of social service programs and a starting point to address discrete issues -- from quality childcare to homelessness to downtown revitalization."]

[Request #S5390]

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State Youth Policy: Helping All Youth to Grow Up Fully Prepared and Fully Engaged. By Thaddeus Ferber and Karen Pittman, The Forum for Youth Investment. (The Forum, Takoma Park, Maryland) June 2002. 52 p.

Full Text at: www.iyfus.org/papers/stateyouthpolicy.pdf

["While states have put in place scores of youth policies, no state can claim to have a single, coherent policy for assessing and planning those individual policies that help all youth grow up fully prepared and fully engaged. This paper presents an overview of efforts underway to develop more coordinated approaches." Connect for Kids (July 8, 2002).]

[Request #S5391]

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STUDIES TO COME
[The following studies, reports, and documents have been ordered or requested, but have not yet arrived. Requests may be placed, and copies will be provided when the material arrives.]

CULTURE AND SOCIETY

CULTURAL POLICY

Cataclysm and Challenge: Impact of September 11, 2001, on Our Nation's Cultural Heritage. By Ruth Hargraves, Heritage Preservation, Inc. 2002. 32 p.

["Heritage Preservation has published this report offering the first comprehensive study of what was lost -- both in Lower Manhattan and at the Pentagon on September 11. The report also highlights findings obtained from a survey conducted in the months immediately following September 2001 that included museums, libraries, archives and other collecting institutions in Lower Manhattan. It reveals significant lessons that may help protect our nation's cultural heritage from future disasters." Cultural Policy Listserv (June 12, 2002) 1.]

[Request #S]

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EDUCATION

STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT

Using Data to Close the Achievement Gap: How to Measure Equity in Our Schools. By Ruth S. Johnson. (Corwin Press, Thousand Oaks, California) 2002. 308 p. TC

["Statistics show that real disparities exist in academic achievement, which consistently coincide with income level and race. This guide highlights evidence that these inequities can be linked to school practices that inadvertently increase inequities ... and suggests a solution lies in the collection and examination of appropriate data." NOTE: Using Data to Close the Achievement Gap ... will be available for 3-day loan.]

[Request #S5392]

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HEALTH

HEALTH CARE INDUSTRY

Bleeding the Patient: The Consequences of Corporate Health Care. By David U. Himmelstein and Steffie Woolhandler. (Common Courage Press, Monroe, Maine) 2001. 224 p. TC

["Most Americans would prefer a national health program like Canada's, one that not only costs less than ours does, but insures everyone.... [The] multibillion-dollar insurance industry promotes managed competition, keeping information from the public.... 45.6% of all bankruptcies involve a medical reason or large medical debt.... Medical malpractice is the leading cause of accidental death."]

[Request #S]

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MINORITIES

"Race Matters in Health Care." By Robin V. Smiles. IN: Black Issues in Higher Education, vol. 19, no. 7 (May 23, 2002) pp. 22-29. And Unequal Treatment: Confronting Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health Care. By Brian Smedley and others, Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences. (The Institute, Washington, DC) 2002. 598 p. TC

Full Text at: http://www.neweconomyindex.org/states/2002/index.html

["For years, Black health care professionals have been pointing out racial and ethnic disparities in access to quality health care, as well as disparities in incidence rates, mortality rates and treatments for certain illnesses. Recently, the National Academy of Science's Institute of Medicine released a report documenting that minorities, regardless of income, education and access were discriminated against in health care."]

[Request #S]

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OBESITY

The Challenge of Preventing and Treating Obesity in Low-income, Preschool Children. By Leigh A. Chamberlin and others. IN: Archives Pediatirics & Adolescent Medicine. Vol. 156 No. 7 (July 2002) 2 p. TC

["Obesity has become a common nutritional concern among low-income, preschool children, a primary target population of the Special Supplemental Nutrition Porgram for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC)."]

[Request #S]

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