Subject: Studies in the News 02-55 (Septmeber 19, 2002)


CALIFORNIA RESEARCH BUREAU
CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY
Studies in the News


California -- One Hundred and Fifty Years Ago

1852 - "In 1852 the Legislature dissolved the (Los Angeles County) Court of Sessions and created a five-member Board of Supervisors. The people of Los Angeles County had asserted their newly won right of self-government and elected a three-man Court of Sessions as their first governing body, (April 1, 1850). "  http://lacounty.info/history.htm  

1852 - "Board of Supervisors, created in 1852, consists of five supervisors who are elected to four year terms and represent specific districts. Los Angeles County was one of the original 27 counties in the state. It was created 18 Feb 1850. The original size was only 4,340 square miles in a small area along the Pacific coast between Santa Barbara and San Diego. Less than a year later, the county was increased to a total of 34,520 square miles covering an area going east as far as the Colorado River. "  http://www.pe.net/~rksnow/calosangelescounty.htm  

Contents This Week

Introductory Material CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT
   African Americans and corrections
   State crime rate increase
   Survey on drug abuse
   Violent crime drop
CULTURE AND SOCIETY
   Residential segregation and diversity
   American Muslims after 9-11
   Women and social capital
ECONOMY
   Pessimism about state’s financial future
   Rich and poor in California
   Black American personal wealth
   Updated 9/11 economic impacts
EDUCATION
   School indicators for Central Valley
   Birth to university and beyond
   Education goals from preschool to college
   Latinos in higher education
   Increase on math scores
EMPLOYMENT
   State's workers and families well-being
   State's labor markets
   Employer health benefits
ENERGY
   Siting power plants
ENVIRONMENT & NATURAL RESOURCES
   State smog levels
   Funding for California's natural resource programs
   Treated outdoor wood and children
GENERAL GOVERNMENT
   Incumbency advantage in elections
   Public health preparedness
   Deterioration of federal surplus
   Inventory of competitive grants
   Contracting and procurement task force
   September 11 and charities
   Supplemental budget report
HEALTH
   Health assessment for diesel exhaust
   Surgery reduces prostate cancer
   Adolescents forgo excercise
   Carpal tunnel and treatments
   Health package and long-term care needs
   Hospital payments for medicaid grants
   Billions in additional Medicaid reimbursements
   HMOs drop more medicare users
HOUSING
   Housing vouchers
   House price index
   Flooding the mortgage market
   Loan pledges in poor areas
HUMAN SERVICES
   Changes to food stamp programs
   Medi-Cal for families leaving welfare
   Reauthorization of TANF
INTERNATIONAL READER
   Mexico's southern border
   Economic survey of Latin America and Caribbean
TRANSPORTATION
   All-terrain vehicle dangers
   Advantages of converting HOV lanes to toll
STUDIES TO COME
   Shortage of skilled workers
   City budgets shaky
   Conservative constituencies
   In-depth view of voters' opinions
Introduction to Studies in the News

Studies in the News is a very current compilation of items significant to the Legislature and Governor's Office. It is created weekly by the State Library's Research Bureau to supplement the public policy debate in California’s Capitol. To help share the latest information with state policymakers, these reading lists are now being made accessible through the State Library’s website. This week's list of current articles in various public policy areas is presented below.

Service to State Employees:

  • When available, the URL for the full text of each item is provided.

  • Items in the State Library collection can be checked out to state officials and staff.

  • Access to all materials listed will be provided by the State Information Reference Center, either by e-mail to cslsirc@library.ca.gov or by calling 654-0261.

The following studies are currently on hand:

CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT

AFRICAN AMERICANS

Cellblocks or Classrooms?: The Funding of Higher Education and Corrections and Its Impact on African American Men. By the Justice Policy Institute. (The Institute, Washington, DC) August 27, 2002. 14 p.

Full Text at: www.justicepolicy.org/coc1/jpi_coc.pdf

["Many More Black Men Jailed Than in College: Ratio Has Reversed Since 1982, Study Finds: The study found that 791,000 black men were in jail or prison in the year 2000, and 603,032 were enrolled in colleges or universities.... About 70 percent of bachelor's degrees received by blacks now go to women." San Francisco Chronicle (August 28, 2002) A6.]

[Request #S5965]

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CRIME RATE

Crime & Delinquency in California 2001. By the Office of the Attorney General, California Department of Justice. (The Office, Sacramento, California) September 5, 2002. 7 p.

Full Text at: ag.ca.gov/cjsc/publications/candd/cd01/preface.pdf

["State Crime Rate Grew by 3.7% in 2001, Reversing Long Trend: Homicides rose in the Southland, up 7% in L.A. County, 17.7% in Riverside County and 12.5% in Orange County.... The violent crime rate decreased by 0.8%, but a surge in property crimes drove up the overall state crime rate." Los Angeles Times (September 6, 2002) 1.]

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DRUGS

Results from the 2001 National Household Survey on Drug Abuse: volume I. Summary of National Findings. By the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Department of Health and Human Services. DHHS Publication No. SMA 02-3758. (The Administration, Rockville, Maryland) August 2002. 16 p.

Full Text at: www.samhsa.gov/oas/nhsda/2k1nhsda/PDF/cover.pdf

["Survey: Drug Use Up Among Youth: Marijuana Is Branded as a 'Clear and Present Danger.': The percentage of marijuana users increased to 5.4 percent in 2001 from 4.8 percent in 2000.... Cocaine users rose to 0.07 percent from 0.05 percent.... Overall, 15.9 million Amricans older than 12 reported using an illicit drug in the month before being interviewed." San Diego Union Tribune (September 6, 2002) 1.]

[Request #S5967]

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VICTIMS

Criminal Victimization 2001: Changes 2000-2001 with Trends 1993-2001. By Callie Rennison, Bureau of Justice Statistics, U.S. Department of Justice. National Crime Victimization Survey NCJ 194610. (The Bureau, Washington, DC) September 2002. 16 p.

Full Text at: www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/pub/pdf/cv01.pdf

["Violent Crime Drops to Its Lowest Level: The number of people who were victims of all violent crimes except murder fell by 9 percent in 2001, sending the crime rate to its lowest level since it was first tracked in 1973.... The survey is based on interviews with victims and so does not include murder." San Francisco Chronicle (September 9, 2002) A3.]

[Request #S5969]

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CULTURE AND SOCIETY

MULTI-ETHNIC SOCIETY

Who's Your Neighbor? Residential Segregation and Diversity in California. By Juan Onesimo Sandoval and others, Public Policy Institute of California. California Counts. Vol. 4, No. 1. (The Institute, San Francisco, California) August 2002. 20 p.

Full Text at: www.ppic.org/publications/CalCounts13/calcounts13.pdf

["Capital Is Most Diverse Big City: Statewide Study Says Jobs and Affordable Housing Are Critical: Sacramento's neighborhoods are more integrated than those in Oakland, San Jose, San Francisco, San Diego, Los Angeles and every other California city with more than 200,000 people, the study found." Sacramento Bee (August 7, 2002) 1.]

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MUSLIM AMERICANS

American Muslims: One Year After 9-11. By the Council of American-Islamic Relations Research Center(CAIR). (The Center, Washington, DC) September 2002. 72 p.

Full Text at: www.cair-net.org/downloads/911report.pdf

["This report indicates that American Muslims took a strong stand against terrorism in the year since the 9/11 attacks. It outlines condemnations of the attacks by national Muslim leaders, Islamic scholars and local religious institutions, including one issued within hours of the attacks. Other issues include ... Muslim assistance in the 9/11 relief efforts, support offered to Muslims by Americans of other faiths, the post-9/11 backlash against Muslims or those perceived to be 'Middle Eastern,' the role anti-Muslim rhetoric plays in promoting hate and bigotry, and the curtailment of civil liberties by government policies targeting Muslims and Arab-Americans." U.S. Newswire (September 5, 2002) online.]

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WOMEN

Women's Status and Social Capital Across the States. By Amy Caiazza and Robert D. Putnam. Institute of Women's Policy Research. (The Institute, Washington, DC) July 2002. 7 p.

Full Text at: www.iwpr.org/pdf/i911.PDF

["This briefing paper analyzes the relationships between social capital and indicators of women's status. Overall, the findings suggest that there is a strong relationship between levels of social capital and women's status. This, in turn, suggests that women and women's organizations should be engaged in this important national debate over how to increase social capital."]

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ECONOMY

CALIFORNIA

Californians and Their Government. By Mark Baldassare, Public Policy Institute of California. PPIC Statewide Survey. (The Institute, San Francisco, California) August 2002. 36 p.

Full Text at: www.ppic.org/publications/CalSurvey29/survey29.pdf

[“Hammered by stock market losses and an anemic economy, Californians are pessimistic about the state’s financial future…. A new poll … showed that 55 percent of Californians are convinced their part of the state is in a recession…. 26 percent say the situation is serious.” San Francisco Chronicle (August 29, 2002) A1.]

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INCOME DISTRIBUTION

A Decade of Progress? The Poor and Affluent in California, 1990 and 2000. By the Ralph and Goldy Lewis Center for Regional Policy Studies, University of California, Los Angeles. (The Center, Los Angeles, California) August 26, 2002. Various pagings.

Full Text at: www.sppsr.ucla.edu/lewis/PressRelease.pdf

["The Center has used newly-released 2000 Census data, to examine the widening gap between the rich and the poor in California, comparing Los Angeles County with the San Francisco Bay area. Among the findings, the gap between the wealthy and the poor in California is increasing with more rich people and more poor people in the state and there are major regional differences between LA and the Bay Area. For example, persons in poverty in Los Angeles increased from 15.1% to 17.9%, while in the Bay area it remained stable (8.6% and 8.7%)." HandsNet (August 30, 2002)]

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SAVINGS

Black American Personal Wealth: Current Status. By Stephen Brobeck, Consumer Federation of America. (The Federation, Washington, DC) August 2002. 4 p.

Full Text at: www.americasaves.org/back_page/BlackWealthReport082902.doc

["Black Investing, Saving Emphasized: African Americans earn more than ever, but many lack investment experience that could help them accumulate more money, consumer advocates said in a report.... The report found that the median household wealth among African Americans grew 321 percent between 1989 and 1998, from $3,680 in 1989 to $15,500." Sacramento Bee (August 30, 2002) D2.]

[Request #S5975]

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U.S. ECONOMY

Updated 9/11 Economic Impacts. By Ross DeVol, Milken Institute. (The Institute, Santa Monica, California) August 2002. 3 p.

Full Text at: www.milkeninstitute.org/poe.cfm?point=ameco

["Economy Better than Expected after 9/11: The U.S. economy is proving more resilient after the September 11 terrorist attacks than first predicted.... The attacks will mean that about 673,100 fewer jobs are created nationwide this year in industries directly affected by the attacks. That figure represents 73,100 fewer losses than estimates first made in January." Sacramento Bee (September 3, 2002) D3.]

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EDUCATION

ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT

Student and School Indicators for Youth in California's Central Valley. By Ann Danenberg and others, Public Policy Institute of California. (The Institute, San Francisco, California) 2002. 96 p.

Full Text at: www.ppic.org/publications/PPIC164/ppic164fulltext.pdf

["Capital-area Students Fare Well; Fifth-graders Top the Region and State in Study of Test Results: The report examines four regions: north Valley, Sacramento Metro, north San Joaquin and south San Joaquin.... Researchers used several indicators to examine student performance, including test scores and high school completion rates." Sacramento Bee (September 4, 2002) B1.]

[Request #S5977]

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CALIFORNIA

From Birth to University and Beyond: Envisioning a New System of Education in California. By the California Children and Families Commission. Building Blocks. Vol. 2, No. 2. (The Commission, Sacramento, California) Summer 2002. 12 p.

Full Text at: www.ccfc.ca.gov/PDF/Prop10Newsletter/Building%20Blocks%20Smr_02.pdf

["Practitioners and policy-makers envision a major revamping of early childhood and education systems to create a comprehensive continuum of support for young children and their families, beginning before birth and continuing through the primary grades.... We turn to California's new 20-year Master Plan for Public Education, which translates the principles of the new model into universal state policy that will reach all young children."]

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The California Master Plan for Education. By the Joint Committee to Develop a Master Plan for Education - Kindergarten through University. (The Committee, Sacramento, California) September 10, 2002. 151 p.

Full Text at: www.sen.ca.gov/masterplan/020909THEMASTERPLANLINKS.HTML

["The California Master Plan for Education.... sets forth a 20-year vision for the schooling of Californians young and old. Key recommendations [include] stop hiring teachers with 'emergency' permits to teach; provide two years of public preschool; require full-day kindergarten; and increase the number of expert teachers on college faculties." San Francisco Chronicle (September 11, 2002) A5.]

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LATINOS

Latinos in Higher Education: Many Enroll, Too Few Graduate. By Richard Fry, Pew Hispanic Center. (The Center, Washington, DC) September 5, 2002. 32 p.

Full Text at: www.pewhispanic.org/site/docs/pdf/latinosinhighereducation-sept5-02.pdf

["Latinos Lag in Earning College Degrees: Census: They Are More Likely to Attend Part Time and Less Likely than Those in Other Population Groups to Get Four-Year or Graduate Diplomas: Only 46.4% of Latino college students who were enrolled in higher education attained four-year bachelor's or graduate programs, compared with 58.2% for blacks, 63.3% for whites and 72% for Asians and Pacific Islanders.." Los Angeles Times (September 6, 2002) 1.]

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STUDENT TESTING

10 – Year Trend in SAT Scores Indicates Increased Emphasis on Math Is Yielding Results; Reading and Writing Are Causes for Concern. By The College Board. (The Board, New York, New York) 2002. 5 p.

Full Text at: www.collegeboard.com/prod_downloads/about/news_info/cbsenior/yr2002/pdf/CBS2002Report.pdf

[“College-bound California students performed virtually the same as the national average in math on the SAT, but class of 2002 continued to lag behind on verbal portion of the test. The SAT results … show that nationally, the average SAT math score rose two points, to 516, continuing a decade-long upward trend.” Sacramento Bee (August 28, 2002) A3.]

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EMPLOYMENT

CALIFORNIA

The State of Working California: Key Findings and a Summary of Data From An Upcoming California Budget Project Report. By The California Budget Project. (The Project, Sacramento, California) September 2002. 31p.

Full Text at: www.cbp.org/2002/pr0209swcsum.pdf

["Little Wage Gain for California Workers; Last Decade's Modest Rise May Yet Be Lost: Despite the great technology boom of the late 1990s, the typical California worker saw only modest income gains during the decade, according to a study.... The report suggests that those gains are in danger of being wiped out during the current economic slump.... The average wage figures conceal a widening gap that separated high earners and low earners." San Francisco Chronicle (September 1, 2002) G2.]

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The State of the State's Labor Markets: A Labor Day Briefing for California. By the Labor Market Information Division, California Employment Development Department. (The Department, Sacramento, California) September 2002. 8 p.

Full Text at: www.calmis.ca.gov/specialreports/Labor-Day-Briefing-2002.pdf

["More Jobs at Less Pay in Future: Report Predicts 3.2 Million New Positions: Some 49 percent of new jobs will pay $14.99 per hour or less -- with the largest segment, 864,000 positions paying less than $10 an hour. About 27 percent of the jobs will pay $25 per hour or more. The report also shows a current wide variation in unemployment rates among racial groups." Oakland Tribune (September 3, 2002) 1.]

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EMPLOYEE BENEFITS

Employer Health Benefits: 2002 Annual Survey. By the Kaiser Family Foundation and Health Research and Educational Trust. (The Foundation, Menlo Park, California) September 5, 2002. 180 p.

Full Text at: www.kff.org/content/2002/3251/3251.pdf

["Employers Shifting Health-Care Costs to Workers: Health insurance premiums shot up last year at their highest rate in more than a decade, with employers passing most of the increases on to their workers, according to a report.... Between the springs of 2001 and 2002, monthly health premiums rose 12.7 percent, the second consecutive year of a double-digit increase and the highest one-year jump since 1990." San Diego Union Tribune (September 6, 2002) 1.]

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ENERGY

UTILITIES

Siting Power Plants: Recent Experience in California and Best Practices in Other States. By Susan F. Tierney and Paul J. Hibbard, Lexecon, Inc. Prepared for the Energy Foundation. Hewlett Packard Energy Series. (The Foundation, San Francisco, California) February 2002. 60 p.

Full Text at: www.ef.org/documents/Siting_Report.pdf

["[The report] concludes that California's traditional rules for the siting of energy projects provide for substantial input in a timely and predictable process. [It]... warns that continued 'expedited' reviews pose a threat to the effective balancing of multiple public interests in power plant siting decisions." State Net Capitol Journal (July 2002) 3."]

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ENVIRONMENT & NATURAL RESOURCES

AIR POLLUTION

Danger in the Air. By Matt Wickersham and Rebecca Stanfield, U.S. Public Interest Research Group. (The Group, Washington, DC) August 2002. 106 p.

Full Text at: uspirg.org/reports/dangerintheair2002.pdf

["California's Air Judged the Dirtiest: State Smog Levels Exceeded Standards 4,634 Times Last Year: Preliminary data from 20 states suggests even more air quality violations this summer.... The group based its dirty air numbers on statistics gathered from states and regional offices of the Environmental Protection Agency." San Francisco Chronicle (August 30, 2002) A12.]

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CALIFORNIA

California's Natural Resource Programs: Where Does the Money Come from and Where Does It Go? By J. Fred Silva, Public Policy Institute of California. (The Institute, San Francisco, California) August 2002. 23 p.

Full Text at: www.ppic.org/publications/PPICEO5/PPICEO5.pdf

["This report analyzes natural resource priorities by reviewing program expenditures and revenues between fiscal years 1978-79 and 2000-01. Findings include the percentage of total state spending directed to natural resources has been declining, resource conservation activities were growing in relation to resource development and resource-related public safety, and allocations from the state general fund declined."]

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CHILDREN

All Hands On Deck. By Sean Gray and Jane Houlihan, Environmental Working Group. (The Group, Washington, DC) August 29, 2002. 18 p.

Full Text at: www.ewg.org/reports/allhandsondeck/AllHandsOnDeck.pdf

[“A new study warns that arsenic used to treat outdoor wood products doesn’t dissipate with time and children who play on decade-old equipment are as likely to be exposed to high levels of the potential cancer-causing agent as are those who play on structures manufactured recently. The Environmental Working Group … strongly challenges the government’s recent assertion that older playground equipment, decks and outdoor furniture made of arsenic-treated lumber pose less of a threat than newer, similarly treated wood products that are being phased out.” San Francisco Chronicle (August 29, 2002) A3.]

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GENERAL GOVERNMENT

ELECTIONS

"The Incumbency Advantage in U.S. Elections: An Analysis of State and Federal Offices, 1942-2000." By Stephen Ansolabehere and James M. Snyder. IN: Election Law Journal, vol. 1, no. 3 (2002) pp. 315-338.

["This paper studies state executive and legislative elections from 1942 to 2000. We study a large number of executives and legislators up for election within each state in a year, and we study a long time frame.... Our approach allows us to examine directly the association between the strength of incumbency and the strength of party in each state, and the correlation between these two factors over time."]

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EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

Public Health Preparedness: Progress and Challenges Since September 11, 2001. By The Trust for America's Health. (The Trust, Baltimore, Maryland) September 2002. 13 p.

Full Text at: healthyamericans.org/resources/files/9-11ProgressReport.pdf

["The task of revitalizing our nation's long-neglected public health system to meet the full range of modern health threats is more than a one year, one shot deal.... Specifically, we need: more and better trained public health professionals; a state-of-the art early warning system and communications network; tracking of diseases and monitoring of emvironmental exposures; and better equipped laboratories."]

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FEDERAL BUDGET

The New Congressional Budget Office Forecast And The Remarkable Deterioration of the Surplus. By Richard Kogan and Robert Greenstein, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. (The Center, Washington, DC) September 3, 2002. 4 p.

Full Text at: www.cbpp.org/9-3-02bud.pdf

["Last year's tax cut is the largest single reason for the deterioration in the surplus since January 2001.... CBO's new projections suggest that OMB's 'mid-session' budget estimates released in July 2002 are too optimistic. The CBO's projections differ from OMB's by more than $900 billion over ten years. Some 98 percent of the difference stems from OMB's rosier view of future revenue collections."]

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FEDERAL GRANTS

Inventory of Competitive Grants for HHS Programs. By Federal Funds Information for States. FFIS Special Analysis, 02-01. (FFIS, Washington, DC) August 7, 2002. 5 p.

["This Special Analysis provides an inventory of all the competitive grants managed by the U.S. Department of Health and Human services for which state and local governments are eligible to apply. There are 185 health and human service programs, totaling approximately $28 billion."]

[Request #S5992]

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INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

Final Report. By Cliff Allenby and others, Contracting & Procurement Task Force. (The Task Force, Sacramento, California) August 19, 2002. 28 p.

["New Limits Urged on State Contracts; The Proposals Were Prompted by The No-Bid Oracle Deal: The use of no-bid contracts for state government's information technology purchases should be limited, and all computer deals should receive more legal scrutiny, according to a report.... [It] also recommends that state procurement officers receive more training before signing contracts that obligate the state for hundreds of thousands of dollars. Sacramento Bee (August 20, 2002) A3.]

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NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS

September 11: Interim Report on the Response of Charities. By the U. S. General Accounting Office. GAO-02-1037. (The Office, Washington, DC) September 3, 2002. 41 p.

Full Text at: www.gao.gov/cgi-bin/getrpt?GAO-02-1037

["Americans' Generosity Runs Deep: $1.4 Billion Released, But Process Has Created Skepticism: A survey of 1,000 adults taken a few weeks ago found that 42 percent of Americans now had 'less confidence in charities because of the way the September 11 donations were handled.'... At least 20 New Yorkers have been arrested for stealing about $1 million in aid, the General Accounting Office said." Washington Times (September 9, 2002) A1.]

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STATE BUDGET

Supplemental Report of the 2002 Budget Act 2002-03 Fiscal Year: Containing Statements of Intent or Requests for Studies Adopted by the Legislature. By the Legislative Analyst Office. (The Office, Sacramento, California) September 2002. 107 p.

Full Text at: www.lao.ca.gov

[Includes: "Legislative, Judicial, Executive;" "State and Consumer Services;" "Business, Transportation and Housing;" "Resource;" "Health and Social Services;" "Youth and Adult Correctional;" "Education;" "General Government" and "Capital Outlay."]

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HEALTH

AIR POLLUTION

Health Assessment Document for Diesel Exhaust. By the National Center for Environmental Assessment, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. USEPA EPA/600/8-90/057F. (The Center, Washington, DC) May 2002. 651 p.

Full Text at: cfpub.epa.gov/ncea/cfm/recordisplay.cfm?deid=29060

["New EPA Study Details Danger of Diesel Exhaust; Report Confirms Earlier Findings by California's Department: Confirming earlier California studies, a new federal report acknowledges that diesel exhaust from trucks, buses and other equipment very likely triggers asthma attacks and causes cancer." San Francisco Chronicle (September 4, 2002) 1.]

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CANCER

"Surgery and the Reduction of Mortality from Prostate Cancer." By P. C. Walsh. IN: New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 347, no. 11 (September 12, 2002) pp. 839-840.

["For the first time, scientists have shown ... that surgery to remove a cancerous prostate gland can reduce the risk of death from the disease." Sacramento Bee (September 12, 2002) A9.]

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EXERCISE

“Decline in Physical Activity in Black Girls and White Girls During Adolescence.” By Sue Y. S. Kimm and others. IN: New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 347, no. 10 (September 5, 2002) pp. 709-715.

[“The amount of regular exercise girls get falls off dramatically as they move through their teenage years, dropping to practically zero in many cases, especially among blacks…. By the time they were 16 or 17, more than half of the black girls in the study and nearly a third of the white girls reported they got no regular exercise at all outside school.” San Francisco Chronicle (September 5, 2002) A4.]

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HEALTH CARE

"Splinting vs. Surgery in the Treatment of Carpal Tunnnel Syndrome. By Annette A. M. Gerritsen and others." IN: JAMA: Journal of American Medical Association, vol. 288, no. 10 (September 11, 2002) pp. 1245-1251.

["Surgery for carpal tunnel syndrome produces better long-term results than the more common treatment of putting a splint on the wrist.... The study suggested that surgery should be the first rather than last option for most patients." Sacramento Bee (September 11, 2002) A12.]

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LONG TERM CARE

House Passes Health Package That Provides Little Assistance To People With Long-Term Care Needs. By Edwin Park, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. (The Center, Washington, DC) August 2002. 6 p.

Full Text at: www.cbpp.org/8-16-02health.pdf

["The legislation (H.R.4946) includes two provisions related to long-term care. The first ... would provide a deduction for the purchase of long-term care insurance. The second would permit taxpayers who care for family members with long-term care needs in their homes to claim an additional personal exemption on their returns. Both provisions are likely to be ineffective in helping lower and middle income people."]

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MEDICAID

House Action Would Partially Reduce Disproportionate Share Hospital Cliff. By Federal Funds Information for States. Issue Brief, 02-42. (FFIS, Washington, DC) July 22, 2002. 4 p.

["States stand to lose $1 billion in fiscal year (FY) 2003 Medicaid grants under current law, as temporary increases in (FY) 2001 and 2002 disproportionate share hospital (DSH) payments expire. House-passed legislation (H.R. 4954) would reduce the loss in 19 states by an estimated $326 million."]

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Senate Approves Temporary Fiscal Relief Amendment. By Federal Funds Information for States. FFIS Issue Brief 02-43. (FFIS, Washington, DC) July 31, 2002. 3 p.

["States stand to gain $5.7 billion in additional Medicaid reimbursements and $3 billion in block grant funds under a temporary fiscal relief provision that is part of broader legislation passed .... Forty-six states experienced budget shortfalls in fiscal year (FY) 2002. Sixteen states began FY 2003 already knowing that revenue assumptions made only a few months earlier were already too optimistic and would have to be adjusted downward. A wide variety of responses have been implemented, including spending reserves, raising taxes, reducing expenditures, imposing cost controls and pursuing benefit and eligibility cutbacks in Medicaid."]

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MEDICARE

Medicare + Choice Participation in 2003: Memorandum : Press Release. By the American Association of Health Plans. (The Association, Washington, DC) September 9, 2002. 2 p.

Full Text at: www.aahp.org/

["Since 1998, HMOs have dropped more than 2.4 million U.S. Medicare patients, according to the American Association of Health Plans.... PacifiCare of California, which had already pulled out of parts of Contra Costa and Alameda counties last year, said it will exit the remaining portion of those counties on January. 1.... Separately, Health Net said it plans to stop offering service in the Livermore area." San Francisco Chronicle, California (September 10, 2002) B1.]

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HOUSING

AFFORDABLE HOUSING

Funding New Welfare-To-Work Housing Vouchers Should Be a Priority For Fiscal Year 2003. By Barbara Sard and Shayna Strom, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. (The Center, Washington, DC) August 28, 2002. 18 p.

Full Text at: www.cbpp.org/8-28-02hous.pdf

["In fiscal year 1999, Congress funded 50,000 'welfare-to-work' housing vouchers to help current or recent welfare recipients find and keep housing. By the end of July 2002, more than 60,000 families had participated in the program. According to this analysis, the Senate Appropriations committee’s approval of a VA-HUD appropriations bill that sets aside approximately 3,300 new welfare-to-work housing vouchers is a step forward, but falls well short of the need — and short of the Bush Administration’s request for at least 34,000 new vouchers." Connect for Kids Weekly (September 9, 2002)]

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HOMEBUYING

House Price Index: Second Quarter 2002. By the Office of Federal Housing Enterprise Oversight. (The Office, Washington, DC) September 3, 2002. 54 p.

Full Text at: www.ofheo.gov/house/2q02hpi.pdf

["The Quarterly Increase Is The Strongest Since 1989, But Analysts Say The Southland Market Does Not Applear To Be Overheated: Los Angeles County's 10.3% increase from a year earlier ranks it 34th in appreciation among the nation's major metropolitian areas. Prices in the county grew 55% in the last five years, compared with a statewide average of 64%" Los Angeles Times (September 4, 2002) 1.]

[Request #S6005]

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Flooding the Mortgage Market. By Jane D'Arista, Financial Markets Center. Flow of Funds: Review & Analysis. 1st Quarter. (The Center, Philomont, Virginia) 2002. 6 p.

Full Text at: www.fmcenter.org/pdf/flow0602.pdf

["Repeating the ongoing pattern of recent years, expansive borrowing by federally related mortgage pools and government sponsored enterprises such as Fannie Mae and Fannie Mac fueled the rise in mortgage indebtedness. In the first quarter, new debt issuance by these agencies rose 13.4 percent, up from 12.1 percent in the fourth quarter of 2001."]

[Request #S6006]

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REAL ESTATE LOANS

Do CRA Agreements Influence Lending Patterns? By Raphael W. Bostic, USC Lusk Center for Real Estate, University of Southern California and Breck L. Robinson, University of Delaware. (The Center, Los Angeles, California) July 2002. 41 p.

Full Text at: www.usc.edu/schools/sppd/lusk/research/papers/pdf/wp_2002_1007.pdf

["Loan Pledges Initially Pay Off in Poor Areas; Banking; Programs Sought by Activists Spark Surges in Lending, But Levels Typically Fall by the Third Year, Study Finds: The fact that lending fell back to its original levels by the third year suggests the agreements may typically help only the 'cream of the crop' -- the top tier of potential borrowers in low- and moderate-income areas." Los Angeles Times (August 5, 2002) 1.]

[Request #S6007]

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HUMAN SERVICES

FOOD STAMPS

Implementing New Changes to the Food Stamp Program: A Provision by Provision Analysis of the Farm Bill. By Stacy Dean and Dorothy Rosenbaum, Center On Budget and Policy Priorities. (The Center, Washington, DC) August 2002. 86 p.

Full Text at: www.cbpp.org/8-27-02fa.pdf

["The food stamp provisions of the Farm Bill equip states with tools to deliver benefits more effectively to eligible households.... This paper provides information and analysis on the new options that state administrators and non-profit groups can use to evaluate the merits of each option and to examine possible implementation issues."]

[Request #S6011]

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TEMPORARY ASSISTANCE FOR NEEDY FAMILIES

Transitional Medi-Cal for Families Leaving Welfare is Underused. By Jane Maulden and others, California Policy Research Center. CPRC Brief. vol. 14, no. 5. (The Center, Berkeley, California) August 2002. 4 p.

Full Text at: www.ucop.edu/cprc/transmedicalbrf.pdf

["Our research points to various problems in TMC (Transitional Medi-Cal Assistance) implementation that made the program less effective than was intended.... A study of the implementation process would indicate the extent to which the new policy has overcome past barriers to enrolling welfare exiters into Medi-Cal, barriers that led to the low participation rates we have documented."]

[Request #S6012]

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One Step Forward or Two Steps Back? Why the Bipartisan Senate Finance Bill is a Better Approach to TANF Reauthoriaztion than the House Bill. By Shawn Fremstad and others, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities and Center for Law and Social Policy. (The Center, Washington, DC) August 2002. 32 p.

Full Text at: www.clasp.org/DMS/Documents/1028928846.02/13reasons.pdf

["While the Senate Finance bill is not without its problems, it includes several provisions that would more effectively address the challenges faced by low-income families than the House bill. There is also agreement between the two bills on a set of fundamental structure and funding issues. Given that the basis for productive bipartisan legislation exists, Congress and the Administration should be able to meet this year's legislative deadline for TANF reauthorization."]

[Request #S6013]

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INTERNATIONAL READER

Mexico's Forgotten Southern Border: Does Mexico Practice at Home What It Preaches Abroad? By George W. Grayson. Center for Immigration Studies Backgrounder. (The Center, Washington, DC) July 2002. 12 p.

Full Text at: www.cis.org/articles/2002/back702.pdf

["This Backgrounder explores Mexican policy with respect to Central Americans and other foreigners who unlawfully enter the country by crossing its zigzagged, mountainous, and jungle-infested 750-mile southern border with Guatemala and Belize ... identify abuses suffered by these illegal aliens ... [and] present the key differences between the political environments at the Mexico-Guatemala-Belize and U.S.-Mexico frontiers."]

[Request #S6014]

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Current Conditions and Outlook: Economic Survey of Latin America and the Caribbean 2001-2002. By the United Nations Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean. (The Commission, New York,New York) 2002. 47 p.

Full Text at: www.eclac.org/publicaciones/DesarrolloEconomico/4/LCG2184P/lcg2184i.pdf

["Latin America and the Caribbean will have lost 'a full half-decade of growth' as of this year, with an average per capita GDP decline of two percent with respect to 1997.... The worst depression for this year ... will be Argentina, where GDP is forecast to fall 13.5 percent." InterPress Service (August 1, 2002) 1.]

[Request #S6015]

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TRANSPORTATION

AUTOMOBILE SAFETY

All Terrain Vehicle ATV Safety Crisis: America's Children at Risk. By the Consumer Federation of America and others. (The Federation, Washington, DC) August 2002. 26 p.

Full Text at: www.bluewaternetwork.org/reports/rep_pl_offroad_atvreport.pdf

["All-Terrain Vehicles Still Dangerous After Changes For Safety, Groups Say: Arguing that all-terrain vehicles are more dangerous than ever, consumer and environmental groups called for a ban on their use by children younger than 16.... From 1993 to 2001, the number of injuries ATVs cause annually more than doubled to 111,700.... From 1982 to 2001, at least 4,541 Americans were killed while riding ATVs." Gannett News Service (August 21, 2002) 1.]

[Request #S6016]

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HIGHWAY TRAFFIC

New Research on HOT Lanes. By Robert Poole, Reason Public Policy Institute. (The Institute, Los Angeles, California) August 6, 2002. 2p.

Full Text at: www.rppi.org/researchonhotlanes.html

["In almost all cases, HOT or Toll lanes provide a greater degree of fiscal, consumer welfare, and environmental benefits than any other expressway investments....These results clearly support the idea that many of today's HOV lanes are candidates for conversion to Toll."]

[Request #S6017]

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STUDIES TO COME
[The following studies, reports, and documents have been ordered or requested, but have not yet arrived. Requests may be placed, and copies will be provided when the material arrives.]

EMPLOYMENT

WORKFORCE PREPARATION

Raising the Curtain: The Technology Economy of Orange County. By Grubb & Ellis, Stradling Yocca Carlson & Rauth. LARTA: Los Angeles Regional Technology Alliance. (The Alliance, Los Angeles, California) 2002. Various papgings.

[“According to a new report … Orange County needs to strengthen the relationship between its universities and the local tech community or its status as a high-tech spot will be short-lived…. The study says the county has a shortage of skilled workers, lacks a major airport and has subpar research and development activity. Rising costs and poor infrastructure are causing some executives and manufacturers to consider leaving the county.” Orange County Register (August 27, 2002) 1.]

[Request #S6018]

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GENERAL GOVERNMENT

LOCAL GOVERNMENT

City Fiscal Conditions in 2002. By the National League of Cities (The League, Washington, DC) 2002.

["Cities Forecast Bleak Futures for Their Budgets: The economic downturn and higher homeland security spending will hurt city finances.... For the first time since 1993, a majority (55 percent) of the surveyed finance officers said their cities are less able to meet their city's financial needs in 2002, compared to 2001." Nation's Cities Weekly (August 19, 2002) 1.]

[Request #S6019]

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POLITICS & PUBLIC POLICY

Lawyers for Conservative Causes: Clients, Ideology, and Social Distance. By John P. Heinz and others, Institute for Policy Research. (The Institute, Evanston, Illinois)August 2002.

["This paper presents data on the characteristics of and relationships among lawyers affiliated with organizations active on a set of 17 conservative issues. We find that the lawyers serve separate and distinct constituencies -- business conservatives, Christian conservatives, libertarians, abortion opponents, etc -- and that the attributes of lawyers serving these constituencies differ significantly."]

[Request #S6020]

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VOTERS & VOTING

A California State of Mind: The Conflicted Voter in a Changing World. By Mark Baldassare. (Public Policy Institute, San Francisco, California and University of California Press, Oakland, California) 2002. 240 p.

["Mark Baldassare examines the opinions, concerns, public policy preferences, and ballot choices of Californians during the fleeting moment of prosperity that roughly coincided with the 2000 election cycle.... [He] provides an in-depth view of residents' thoughts on several crucial policy issues: taxes and government spending, public schools, and the environment." Research Brief (September 2002) 1.]

[Request #S6008]

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