Subject: Studies in the News 02-59 (October 8, 2002)


CALIFORNIA RESEARCH BUREAU
CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY
Studies in the News:
Children and Family Supplement


Contents This Week

Introductory Material CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT
   Children, youth and gun violence
CULTURE AND SOCIETY
   Latino growth in metropolitan America
EDUCATION
   Understanding developmental disabilities
   Universal preschool framework
   Internet access in public classrooms and schools
   Public school choice
   Improving teacher education
ENVIRONMENT & NATURAL RESOURCES
   Air pollution risks for children
HEALTH
   Childhood vaccine shortages
   Life opportunities for children with disabilities
   Caring for children with disabilities
   Children with disabilities
   Unmet mental health care needs
   Intergenerational vision of mental health services
   Mental health services for traumatized children
   Teenage mental health
HUMAN SERVICES
   Adoption judges gain more say
   State child care cutbacks
   Child care assistance not utilized
   Steady improvement for the conditions of children
   Urban and suburban poverty
   Long-term welfare recipients
   Self sufficiency and welfare recipients
   States' response to children in poverty
STUDIES TO COME
   Most complete data on U.S. religious affiliation
   Social background and school readiness
   Racial inequality in special education
   School violence motivations
Introduction to Studies in the News

Studies in the News is a very current compilation of items significant to the Legislature and Governor's Office. It is created weekly by the State Library's Research Bureau to supplement the public policy debate in California’s Capitol. To help share the latest information with state policymakers, these reading lists are now being made accessible through the State Library’s website. This week's list of current articles in various public policy areas is presented below.

Service to State Employees:

  • When available, the URL for the full text of each item is provided.

  • Items in the State Library collection can be checked out to state officials and staff.

  • Access to all materials listed will be provided by the State Information Reference Center, either by e-mail to cslsirc@library.ca.gov or by calling 654-0261.

The following studies are currently on hand:

CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT

CHILDREN & YOUTH

Children, Youth, and Gun Violence: Analysis [Issue Theme]. By the David and Lucile Packard Foundation. The Future of Children, Vol. 12, No. 2. (The Foundation, P.A.) Summer/Fall 2002. 182 p.

["Each year, more than 20,000 children and youth under age 20 are killed or injured by firearms in the United States. The lethality of guns, as well as their easy accessibility to young people, are key reasons why firearms are the second leading cause of death among young people ages 10 to 19. Only motor vehicle accidents claim more young lives."]

Executive Summary. 4 p.:
http://futureofchildren.org/usr_doc/tfoc_12-2_sum1.pdf

Full Report. 182 p.:
http://www.futureofchildren.org/usr_doc/tfoc_12-2_full.pdf

[Request #S6134]

Return to the Table of Contents

CULTURE AND SOCIETY

LATINOS

Latino Growth in Metropolitan America: Changing Patterns, New Locations. By Robert Suro and Audrey Singer, Center on Urban and Metropolitan Policy and The Pew Hispanic Center. (The Center, Washington, DC) 2002. 18 p.

Full Text at: www.brook.edu/es/urban/publications/surosinger.pdf

["For decades, Mexican immigrants ... have quietly followed a path that only now is attracting attention..... They went to a place where, researchers say, many Latinos are staying: the suburbs.... The study concluded that Latinos have spread out faster than any previous immigrant wave or internal migration, lured by jobs, housing availability and other pull factors." San Diego Union Tribune (September 17, 2002) 1.]

[Request #S6135]

Return to the Table of Contents

EDUCATION

DISABILITIES

Dictionary of Developmental Disabilities Terminology. Second Edition. By Pasquale J. Accardo and others. (Paul H. Brookes Publishing, Baltimore, Maryland) 2002. 452 p.

["Written by a diverse group of professionals for a multidisciplinary audience, this comprehensive reference helps parents, students, and professionals deepen their understanding of developmental disabilities, enhance their communication with each other, and find fast, reliable answers to crucial questions." NOTE: Dictionary of Developmental ... is available for 3-day loan.]

[Request #S6136]

Return to the Table of Contents

EARLY EDUCATION

Universal Access to Preschool Including Early Care and Education Plan Framework. By the Los Angeles County Children and Families First - Proposition 10 Commission. (The Commission, Los Angeles, California) September 6, 2002. 17 p.

Full Text at: www.prop10.org/cdi/9-6-02/Concept%20Paper.pdf

["The Los Angeles County Children and Families First Commission voted in early August to provide universal, full-day prekindergarten to Los Angeles families, regardless of income.... The program will initially target children in neighborhoods with low-performing schools, but advocates hope to eventually expand the program to serve children from birth to age five throughout the county. Backers of the plan aim to enroll at least 70 percent of Los Angeles County's 300,000 3- and 4-year olds in the voluntary program." Children's Defense Funds CDF Child Care Advocacy Newsletter (September 23, 2002).]

[Request #S6137]

Return to the Table of Contents

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

Internet Access in U.S. Public Schools and Classrooms: 1994-2001. By Anne Kleiner and Elizabeth Farris, Westat. NCES 2002-018. (National Center for Education Statistics, Washington, DC) September 2002. 80 p.

Full Text at: nces.ed.gov/pubs2002/2002018.pdf

["This report presents data on Internet access in U.S. public schools from 1994 to 2001 by school characteristics. It provides trend analysis on the progress of public schools and classrooms in connecting to the Internet and on the ratio of students to instructional computers with Internet access. It also contains information on special hardware and software for students with disabilities, school-sponsored e-mail addresses, school Web sites, and technologies and procedures to prevent student access to inappropriate material on the Internet."]

[Request #S6138]

Return to the Table of Contents

SCHOOL VOUCHERS

Divided We Fail: Coming Together Through Public School Choice. By the Century Foundation Task Force on the Common School. (The Foundation, New York, New York) 2002. 68 p.

["It is unfair to trap poor children in failing schools, but vouchers are not the answer, says this report on the increasing socio-economic segregation of schools. Compulsory busing is not the solution for equal opportunity in public education, either. The taskforce recommends public policy measures that provide choice within the public school system, where 90 percent of American children are educated." Connect for Kids Weekly (September 23, 2002).]

Executive Summary. 18 p.:
http://www.tcf.org/Publications/Education/execsum-cstf.pdf

Full Report. 68 p.:
http://www.tcf.org/Publications/Education/dividedwefail.pdf

[Request #S6139]

Return to the Table of Contents

TEACHERS & TEACHING

Teaching As a Clinical Profession: A New Challenge For Education. By Michael deCourcy Hinds, Carnegie Corporation. (The Corporation, New York, New York) September 2002. 18 p.

Full Text at: www.carnegie.org/pdf/teachered.pdf

["School 'Clinic' Model Urged: The recommendation would give teachers residency training, much like doctors.... Such programs would provide each student with faculty mentors and coaches as part of the two-year residency during the transition from college to classroom. More than $40 million over the next ten years will be spent on the 'Teachers for a New Era' initiative. California State University, Northridge, is of the four universities chosen to participate." Sacramento Bee (September 19, 2002)1.]

[Request #S6140]

Return to the Table of Contents

ENVIRONMENT & NATURAL RESOURCES

CHILDREN

Toxic Beginnings: Cancer Risks to Children from California's Air Pollution. By the National Environmental Trust. (The Trust, Washington, DC) September 2002. 26 p.

Full Text at: environet.policy.net/health/toxic_beginnings02.pdf?PROACTIVE_ID=cecfcec8c8c9c7c7cfc5cecfcfcfc5cecfc6cacdc7cbc7cfcec5cf

["Children in California are at greater risk of contracting cancer from inhaling toxic air pollutants than are adults. This new study claims that 3-week-olds in the state's five most polluted regions have been exposed to more pollution than the federal government deems acceptable over a lifetime. The study examined pollution concentrations in the Sacramento Valley, the San Joaquin Valley, the San Francisco Bay Area, the Los Angeles region and San Diego." Sacramento Bee (September 16, 2002) A7.]

[Request #S6023]

Return to the Table of Contents

HEALTH

CHILDHOOD IMMUNIZATION

Childhood Vaccines: Ensuring an Adequate Supply Poses Continuing Challenges. By the U.S. General Accounting Office. GAO-02-987. (The Office, Washington, DC) September 2002. 46 p.

Full Text at: www.gao.gov/cgi-bin/getrpt?GAO-02-987

["Recent childhood vaccine shortages have prompted federal authorities as well as a majority of states to waive or change immunization requirements. Agencies and advisory committees are exploring the issue but have few long-term solutions. This report recommends that HSS promote the availability of vaccinations."]

[Request #S6141]

Return to the Table of Contents

DISABILITIES

"Children With Disabilities." By Kelly Mack, Child Welfare League of America. Children's Voice. (The League, Washington, DC) July/August 2002. 7 p. [online.]

Full Text at: www.cwla.org/articles/cv0207childrendisabilities.htm

["In families, classrooms, and playgrounds, children with disabilities are growing and chasing the education and life opportunities that child welfare workers pursue for all children. The battle to improve the lives of children with disabilities frequently has been uphill -- from being denied basic education, to exclusion from public participation, to limited career opportunities."]

[Request #S6142]

Return to the Table of Contents

"Serving Children With disABILITIES." By Kelly Mack and Steve Boehm, Child Welfare League of America. IN: Children's Voice. (September/October 2002) [online.]

Full Text at: www.cwla.org/articles/cv0209serving.htm

["Agencies and individuals who work with children and youth are becoming more aware of the specific concerns of children with disabilities and their families, targeting children's needs and addressing family challenges. Strides in foster care, adoption, housing, and juvenile justice are providing more opportunities for these children to grow and participate in society. The programs and ideas offered in this series are just a brief list of examples in caring for children with disabilities, allowing them to grow up happy, healthy, and productive."]

[Request #S6143]

Return to the Table of Contents

Children with Disabilities. By Mark L. Batshaw. (Paul H. Brookes Publishing, Baltimore, Maryland) 2002. 871 p.

[Includes: "Birth Defects, Prenatal Diagnosis, and Fetal Therapy;" "Growth Before Birth;" "Developmental Disabilities;" "PKU and other Inborn Errors of Metabolism;" "Attention Deficits and Hyperactivity;" "Specific Learning Disabilities;" and others. NOTE: Children with Disabilities is available for 3-day loan.]

[Request #S6144]

Return to the Table of Contents

MENTAL HEALTH

"Unmet Need for Mental Health Care Among U.S. Children: Variation by Ethnicity and Insurance Status." By Sheryl Kataoka and others. IN: The American Journal of Psychiatry, vol. 159, no. 9 (September 2002) pp. 1548-1555.

["This study finds that ... nearly 80% of the children and adolescents who were defined as needing mental health services did not receive services.... The rate of unmet mental health care was greater among Latino than white children, among uninsured children than insured children." Children Defense Fund's Health Information Project (September 27, 2002).]

[Request #S6133]

Return to the Table of Contents

The Well Being of Our Nation: An Inter-Generational Vision of Effective Mental Health Services and Supports. By Michael Allen, Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law. Prepared for the National Council on Disability. (The Council, Washington, DC) September 2002. 89 p.

Full Text at: www.ncd.gov/newsroom/publications/pdf/mentalhealth.pdf

["Mental Health Care Crisis: The U.S. mental health system is in crisis, unable to provide even the most basic services and supports to people with psychiatric disabilities, according to a federal report.... Expanding Medicaid eligibility and reimbursable services are the most significant steps that can be taken to improve the system, the panel said." Sacramento Bee (September 17, 2002) A7.]

[Request #S6145]

Return to the Table of Contents

Mental Health Services: Effectiveness of Insurance Coverage and Federal Programs for Children Who Have Experienced Trauma Largely Unknown. By the U.S. General Accounting Office. GAO-02-813. (The Office, Washington, DC) August 2002. 114 p.

Full Text at: www.gao.gov/new.items/d02813.pdf

["Some children who experience trauma may suffer few ill effects, but for those who need intervention, access to critical mental health services may be hard to come by, even with health insurance, according to this report. Children with private health insurance may face limitations in their mental health coverage; those with Medicaid or SCHIP coverage may face shortages in professional service providers due to low reimbursement rates and other factors. While there are over 50 federal programs that might help children exposed to violence, little is known about the extent to which these broader programs actually reach or effectively assist these children." Connect for Kids Weekly (September 30, 2002).]

[Request #S6146]

Return to the Table of Contents

YOUTH

Promoting Positive Mental and Emotional Health in Teens: Some Lessons from Research. By Jonathan F. Zaff and others. Child Trends Research Brief. (Child Trends, Washington, DC) September 2002. 8 p.

Full Text at: www.childtrends.org/PDF/K5Brief.pdf

["This brief addresses mental health in adolescence [and] emotional well-being. Also included are some 'best bets,' promising practices drawing on both experimental and quasi-experimental evaluations, other research, and wisdom from practitioners."]

[Request #S6147]

Return to the Table of Contents

HUMAN SERVICES

ADOPTION

Teresa J., et al. v. The Superior Court of Sacramento County. Superior Court of Sacramento County, Third Appellate District. September 24, 2002. 16 p.

Full Text at: www.courtinfo.ca.gov/opinions/documents/C039786.PDF

["A state appellate court has given juvenile judges and referees broad discretion to ignore state approved private adoptions if they determine such a move would not be in the child's best interests .... The justices noted that allowing third parties ... to become involved in the placement of foster children may 'cause problems' and create delays in finding children permanent homes. The ruling also laid out a blueprint using the state's existing dependency law for making decisions 'in the child's best interests'." Sacramento Bee (September 25, 2002) B1.]

[Request #S6148]

Return to the Table of Contents

CHILD CARE

Low-Income Families Bear the Burden of State Child Care Cutbacks. By the Children's Defense Fund. (The Fund, Washington, DC) September 5, 2002. 29 p.

Full Text at: www.childrensdefense.org/pdf/cc_statecutsreport.pdf

["According to this report, state budget shortfalls are causing drastic cuts in child care services for low-income working parents. The cutbacks are adding thousands of children to already lengthy waiting lists and jeopardizing their parents’ ability to keep the jobs they need to support their families. Childcare and welfare legislation now pending in Congress is urgently needed to help states address their growing budget and childcare crises." HandsNet (September 6, 2002).]

[Request #S6008]

Return to the Table of Contents

The Vast Majority of Federally-Eligible Children Did Not Receive Child Care Assistance in FY 2000: Increased Child Care Funding Needed to Help More Families. By Jennifer Mezey and others, Center for Law and Social Policy. (The Center, Washington, DC) October 2002. 12 p.

Full Text at: www.clasp.org/DMS/Documents/1024427382.81/1in7full.pdf

["What share of eligible low-income families and children are receiving child care assistance? Based on recently released data from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, CLASP estimates that states served about 14 percent of federally-eligible children (approximately 1 out of 7)." Electronic Policy Network (October 2, 2002).]

[Request #S6149]

Return to the Table of Contents

CHILDREN

Children’s Score Card: 1995-1999. By Los Angeles County Children’s Planning Council. (The Council, Los Angeles, California) August 2002. 39 p.

Full Text at: www.childrensplanningcouncil.org/resource-files/childrens_scorecard02.pdf

["The health, safety and social conditions of children in Los Angeles County showed steady improvement at the close of the 1990s, but a comprehensive new study also found troubling inequalities, depending on where youngsters live…. The Children’s Planning Council showed declines in the numbers of children living in poverty, exposed to violent crime and born with low birth weight.” Los Angeles Times (August 29, 2002) 1.]

[Request #S6010]

Return to the Table of Contents

POVERTY

A Decade of Mixed Blessings: Urban and Suburban Poverty in Census 2000. By Alan Berube, Center on Urban and Metropolitan Policy, Brookings Institution and William H. Frey, Population Studies Center, University of Michigan. (The Institution, Washington, DC) August 2002. 18 p.

Full Text at: www.brookings.edu/dybdocroot/es/urban/publications/berubefreypoverty.pdf

["The study examined poverty trends in the nation's largest 100 metropolitan areas. While the percentage of people living below the poverty line declined nationally from 13.1 percent in 1990 to 12.4 percent in 2000, this modest good news masked more complex trends taking place in cities, in suburbs, and across the different regions of the country.... Poverty rates increased in cities and suburbs throughout New England, New York, and Southern California."]

[Request #S6150]

Return to the Table of Contents

WELFARE

Work, Income, and Well-Being Among Long-Term Welfare Recipients: Findings From a Survey of California's Precarious Families. By Matthew Stagner and others, the Urban Institute. (The Institute, Washington, DC) September 2002. 35 p.

Full Text at: www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/310559_DP02-10.pdf

["The study found that the population of long-term welfare recipients in California was not a homogenous group. Some families achieved self-sufficiency and were out of poverty, others were balancing work and welfare, and the rest were poor and very dependent on welfare. The group was diverse in terms of other measures as well; specifically physical, emotional, and social well-being."]

[Request #S6030]

Return to the Table of Contents

WELFARE REFORM

Making Work Pay: Final Report on Self-Sufficiency Project for Long-Term Welfare Recipients: Executive Summary. By Charles Michalopoulos, Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation, and others. Prepared for the Social Research and Demonstration Corporation. (The Corporation, Ottowa, Ontario, Canada) July 2002. 28 p.

Full Text at: www.mdrc.org/Reports2002/ssp_makeworkpay_srdc/SSP-54-Month-Exec-Summ_1.pdf

["In the self-sufficiency project (SSP) 'recipient study,' a group of about 6,000 single parents who had been on income assistance for at least a year were selected at random.... Half were randomly assigned and offered the SSP supplement, while the remainder formed a control group. This report describes the impacts of the supplement offer through four and a half years after random assignment. Comparisons indicate that SSP increased full-time employment, earnings, and income, and reduced poverty."]

[Request #S6151]

Return to the Table of Contents

Children and Welfare Reform: What Policy Theories Are Being Implemented in States Where Most Poor Children Live. By Cathy Marie Johnson, Williams College, and others. (The American Political Science Association, Washington, DC) September 2002. 20 p.

Full Text at: www.rockinst.org/publications/federalism/johnsonandgaisapsa2002.pdf

["Poor children remain unevenly distributed among the states, with much higher concentrations in a relatively small number of states. This report investigates how 16 states with high rates of child poverty responded to welfare reform. These states include Arizona, California, Florida, New York, Oklahoma, Texas and West Virginia."]

[Request #S6152]

Return to the Table of Contents


STUDIES TO COME
[The following studies, reports, and documents have been ordered or requested, but have not yet arrived. Requests may be placed, and copies will be provided when the material arrives.]

CULTURE AND SOCIETY

RELIGIOUS FREEDOM

Religious Congregations & Membership in the United States: 2000. By the Glenmary Research Center. (The Center, Nashville, Tennessee)September 20, 2002. p. TC

Full Text at: http://www.glenmary.org/grc/RCMS_2000/Catholic_release.htm

["A portrait of religion in America from a new report compiled by a broad coalition of religious groups.... The study ... includes the number of members and congregations for nearly 150 religious groups." Sacramento Bee (September 18, 2002)1.]

[Request #S]

Return to the Table of Contents

EDUCATION

SCHOOL READINESS

Inequality at the Starting Gate: Social Background Differences in Achievement as Children Begin School. By Valerie E. Lee and David T. Burkam, University of Michigan. (Economic Policy Institute, Washington, DC) September 2002. 102 p.

["The reading and math skills of children entering kindergarten are strongly affected by parents' economic status and involvement in early education efforts, researchers reported. The poor performance of poorer children suggests that their formal schooling should begin even before kindergarten, according to the study's co-author." Contra Costa Times (October 1, 2002) [online]. NOTE: Inequality at the Starting Gate ... will be available for 3-day loan.]

[Request #S6153]

Return to the Table of Contents

SPECIAL EDUCATION

Racial Inequity in Special Education. Edited by Daniel J. Losen and Gary Orfield. (Harvard Education Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts) 2002. 336 p.

["This book explores the inequities experienced by minority children in special education. It provides a review of attempts by legislators, child advocates and education and civil rights enforcement agencies to address these inequities." Education Commission of the States, ECS e-Connection (September 25, 2002). NOTE: Racial Inequality ... will be available for 3-day loan.]

[Request #S6154]

Return to the Table of Contents

VIOLENCE

Deadly Lessons: Understanding Lethal School Violence; Case Studies of School Violence Committee. By Mark H. Moore and others. Prepared for the Committee on Law and Justice, the National Research Council and the Institute of Medicine. (National Academies Press, Washington, DC) 2002. 336 p.

Full Text at: www.nap.edu/books/0309084121/html

["According to this new report ... the motivations for school shootings and workplace shootings are similar: a combination of hard-to-detect mental illness, gradual disillusionment, and perceived injustices." Security Director's Report (August 2002) 8. NOTE: Deadly Lessons ... will be available for 3-day loan.]

[Request #S6155]

Return to the Table of Contents