Subject: Studies in the News 02-62 (October 22, 2002)


CALIFORNIA RESEARCH BUREAU
CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY
Studies in the News
Children and Family Supplement


Contents This Week

Introductory Material EDUCATION
   Family involvement in out-of-school programs
   Promoting early childhood literacy
   Pre-K classroom staffing
EMPLOYMENT
   Illegal child labor
HEALTH
   ADHD linked to smaller brains
   Infants in foster/kinship care
   Antisocial Behavior
   Obesity in children
   Childhood vaccine shortages
HUMAN SERVICES
   Children of immigrants
STUDIES TO COME
   Brain development and behavior
Introduction to Studies in the News

Studies in the News is a very current compilation of items significant to the Legislature and Governor's Office. It is created weekly by the State Library's Research Bureau to supplement the public policy debate in California’s Capitol. To help share the latest information with state policymakers, these reading lists are now being made accessible through the State Library’s website. This week's list of current articles in various public policy areas is presented below.

Service to State Employees:

  • When available, the URL for the full text of each item is provided.

  • Items in the State Library collection can be checked out to state officials and staff.

  • Access to all materials listed will be provided by the State Information Reference Center, either by e-mail to cslsirc@library.ca.gov or by calling 654-0261.

The following studies are currently on hand:

EDUCATION

AFTER SCHOOL PROGRAMS

Beyond the Head Count: Evaluating Family Involvement in Out-Of-School Time. By Margaret S. Caspe and others, Harvard Family Research Project. (The Project, Cambridge, Massachusetts) August 2002. 16 p.

Full Text at: www.gse.harvard.edu/hfrp/content/projects/afterschool/resources/issuebrief4.pdf

["This review of OST(Out-of-SchoolTime) program evaluations that do include family involvement reveals that most programs are conducting formative evaluations to learn about families’ experiences and program practices along the four dimensions of family involvement. Moving forward, especially in the current policy context which emphasizes a connection between OST experiences and academic achievement, evaluation of family involvement in OST programs is key to improving family involvement practices and, ultimately, to fostering improved child outcomes."]

[Request #S6550]

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EARLY EDUCATION

Promoting Early Childhood Literacy: Highlights of State Efforts. By Amy Kinch and Sheri L. Azer. (The National Association for the Education of Young Children, Washington, DC) September 2002. 15 p.

Full Text at: www.naeyc.org/childrens_champions/literac1.pdf

["This report examines what states are doing to support early childhood literacy primarily in out-of-home settings. The report finds a variety of approaches, with a significant number of states developing curriculum guidelines and training programs. But some states have made little or no effort in the areas of professional development and program guidelines." NIEER Online News (October 11, 2002) 1.]

[Request #S6551]

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Inside the Pre-K Classroom: A Study of Staffing and Stability in State-Funded Prekindergarten Programs. By Dan Bellm and others, Center for the Child Care Workforce. (The Center, Washington, DC) October 2002. 139 p.

Full Text at: www.ccw.org/pubs/ccw_pre-k_10.4.02.pdf

["This study finds that teachers in publicly-operated settings are better educated, better paid, and more likely to stay in their jobs than teachers in private settings. It examines staff qualifications, compensation, and turnover in state-funded prekindergarten programs in California, Georgia, Illinois, New York, and Texas. The study finds that, generally speaking, educational qualifications, compensation, and stability of teachers employed in public school-operated prekindergarten programs more closely resemble those of K-12 teachers, while community-based, privately-operated programs tend to reflect the lower qualifications, lower compensation, and higher staff turnover traditionally associated with the child care workforce. In addition, prekindergarten programs in private settings appear to serve as training and apprenticeship programs to prepare teachers for eventual employment in higher-paying, publicly-operated programs." Children's Defense Fund, Child Care and Development Division Newsletter (October 15, 2002) online.]

[Request #S6552]

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EMPLOYMENT

YOUTH

Child Labor: Labor Can Strengthen Its Efforts to Protect Children Who Work. By the U.S. General Accounting Office. GAO-02-880 (The Office, Washington, DC) September 30, 2002. 94 p.

Full Text at: www.gao.gov/new.items/d02880.pdf

[“The U.S. Labor Department has made little headway in halting illegal child labor, a new federal study concludes. The number of children working illegally has remained almost steady for the past decade... Moreover, the number of teenage workers killed each year remained at about 70, but the rate of on-the-job injuries appears to be going up. The [study] found that about 3.7 million youths between the ages of 15 and 17 were in the workforce at least part of last year. The report concluded that 4 percent of those youngsters worked too many hours or held prohibited jobs.” San Francisco Chronicle (October 1, 2002) B10.]

[Request #S6242]

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HEALTH

BRAIN

"Developmental Trajectories of Brain Volume Abnormalities in Children and Adolescents With Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder." By F. Xavier Castellanos and others. JAMA: Journal of the American Medical Association, vol. 288, no. 14 (October 9, 2002) pp. 1740-1748.

["The brains of children and adolescents in whom attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is diagnosed are on average 3 percent to 4 percent smaller in volume than those of children without the condition, according to a large-scale government study. And the greater the severity of a child's symptoms, the greater the discrepancy in the size of various brain areas, as measured on brain scans, the researchers said." The New York Times (October 9, 2002)]

[Request #S6553]

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MENTAL HEALTH

Infants in Foster and Kinship Care: Special Issue. Edited by Robert B. Clyman and Brenda Jones Harden. Infant Mental Health Journal, Vol. 23, No. 5 (Wiley Publishers, Hoboken, New Jersey) September 2002. pp. 433-592.

[Includes: "Assessment, Intervention, and Research with Infants in Out-of-Home Placement;" "Developmental Delay in Young Children in Child Welfare by Initial Placement Type;" "Maltreatment Reports and Placement Outcomes for Infants and Toddlers in Out-of-Home Care;" "Very Young Foster Children and Foster Families: Clinical Challenges and Interventions" and others. NOTE: Available for 3-day loan.]

[Request #S6554]

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Antisocial Behavior in Children and Adolescents: A Developmental Analysis and Model for Intervention. By John B. Reid and others. (American Psychological Association, Washington, DC) 2002. 338 p.

[Includes: "Coercion Theory: The Development of Antisocial Behavior;" "Interventions for Antisocial Behavior: Overview;" and others. NOTE: Antisocial Behavior... is available for 3-day Loan.]

[Request #S6558]

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OBESITY

Prevalence and Trends in Overweight Among U.S. Children and Adolescents, 1999-2000. By Cynthia L. Ogden and others. IN: JAMA: Journal of the American Medical Association, vol. 288, no. 14 (October 9, 2002) pp. 1728-1732.

["This study finds that obesity increased dramatically in American children, adolescents and adults during the 1990's. It is based on data from the 1999-2000 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, analyzed by the National Center for Health Statistics. Among children ages 6 to 19, 15 percent are overweight, triple the proportion from 1980." Children's Defense Fund, Child Health Information Project (October 18, 2002)]

[Request #S6555]

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VACCINES

Childhood Vaccines: Challenges in Preventing Future Shortages. By the U.S. General Accounting Office. GAO-02-1105T (The Office, Washington, DC) September 2002. 11 p.

Full Text at: www.gao.gov/new.items/d021105t.pdf

["States have begun rationing vaccines for children, including those for measles, rubella and chicken pox, and have reduced immunization requirement because of shortages.... Many factors have contributed to the shortages. Some manufacturers have experienced production problems. Some had difficulty complying with federal standards. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention said it could take four to five years to build stockpiles for all the recommended childhood vaccines." San Francisco Chronicle (September 17, 2002) A4.]

[Request #S6556]

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HUMAN SERVICES

IMMIGRATION

Children of Immigrants: A Statistical Profile. By Yuval Elmelech, Bard College, and others. (National Center For Children in Poverty, New York, New York) September 2002. 6 p.

Full Text at: www.nccp.org/immigrants.pdf

["According to the report, empirical evidence on immigration and inequality suggests that many more recent immigrants will remain economically disadvantaged throughout their working lives, and this disadvantage may be partly transmitted to their children. For children living with full-time working parents or in two-parent families, first generation children are four times as likely to be poor as third- or later-generation children."]

[Request #S6557]

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STUDIES TO COME
[The following studies, reports, and documents have been ordered or requested, but have not yet arrived. Requests may be placed, and copies will be provided when the material arrives.]

HEALTH

BRAIN

A Good Start In Life: Understanding Your Child's Brain and Behavior. By Norbert Herschkowitz and Elinor Chapman Herschkowitz. (National Academies Press, Washington, DC) 2002. 288 p.

Full Text at: www.nap.edu/books/0309076390/html/

["This "how-to" book combines sensible parenting guidance with clear explanations of research findings on what's happening in the baby's developing brain from birth to six. The authors explain how developmental milestones — achievements like pointing to a picture or distinguishing right from wrong — are connected to what's happening behind the scenes in a baby's brain." Connect for Kids Weekly (October 7, 2002) 1.]

[Request #S6559]

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