Subject: Studies in the News 02-72 (November 27, 2002)


CALIFORNIA RESEARCH BUREAU
CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY
Studies in the News:
Children and Family Supplement


Contents This Week

Introductory Material CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT
   Reducing recidivism in youths
EDUCATION
   Differential effects of quality child care
   Benefit cost analysis of early intervention
   Instructional models for early childhood education
   Strategies to support Enlish language learners
   Data and early learning systems
   Evidence-based education policy
   Recess in elementary school
   Family literacy and educational improvement
   School readiness components
HEALTH
   Child development and health services
   Mental health services recommendations
HUMAN SERVICES
   Postadoption services for families
   Child care policies in tough times
   Child care experiences of former TANF recipients
   Lost opportunities in child care tax credits
   Economics of child care in Santa Clara County
   Characteristics and estimates of missing children
   Health and schooling internationally
   Foster care geographic differentiations
   Parental marital status and economic well-being
   Race, ethnicity and the gender-poverty gap
STUDIES TO COME
   Multiculturalism in after school programs
   Meeting children's dental needs
Introduction to Studies in the News

Studies in the News is a very current compilation of items significant to the Legislature and Governor's Office. It is created weekly by the State Library's Research Bureau to supplement the public policy debate in California’s Capitol. To help share the latest information with state policymakers, these reading lists are now being made accessible through the State Library’s website. This week's list of current articles in various public policy areas is presented below.

Service to State Employees:

  • When available, the URL for the full text of each item is provided.

  • Items in the State Library collection can be checked out to state officials and staff.

  • Access to all materials listed will be provided by the State Information Reference Center, either by e-mail to cslsirc@library.ca.gov or by calling 654-0261.

The following studies are currently on hand:

CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT

JUVENILE OFFENDERS

Aftercare As Afterthought: Reentry and the California Youth Authority. Next Steps: The California Ex-Offender Community Reentry Project Series. By Michele Byrnes, the Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice. Prepared for the California Joint Committee on Prison Construction and Operation. (The Center, San Francisco, California) 2002. 45 p.; Appendices.

Full Text at: www.cjcj.org/pdf/aftercare.pdf

["Current systems in California fail to address the 91% recidivism of California Youth Authority parolees. At a cost of $48,400 per offender, it costs more than $1.7 million for each youth who drops out of school and becomes involved in crime and drugs. This report highlights nine exemplary programs in seven states and the District of Columbia that have demonstrated success through collaborative, comprehensive services at a lower per-capita cost than incarceration."]

[Request #S6810]

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EDUCATION

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

"Differential Effects of High-Quality Child Care." By Jennifer Hill and others. IN: Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, vol. 21, no. 4 (October 2002) pp. 601-627.

["This article examines the differential causal effects of access to high-quality child care for children who would otherwise have participated in one of three child care options: no non-maternal care, home-based non-maternal care, and center-based care. Results of this study indicate that children participating in the first two types of care would have gained the most from high-quality center-based care and, moreover, would have more consistently retained the bulk of these positive benefits over time."]

[Request #S6811]

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A Benefit Cost Analysis of the Abecedarian Early Childhood Intervention. By Leonard N. Masse, and W. Steven Barnett, National Institute for Early Childhood Research, Rutgers University. (The Institute, New Brunswick, New Jersey) 2002. 50 p.

Full Text at: nieer.org/resources/research/AbecedarianStudy.pdf

["This research set out to assess whether the cost to society was worth the benefits.... Taxpayers received a four-to-one return on their investment, in addition to significant social dividends and including better school success.... The study also shows significantly higher lifetime earnings for both the children and their mothers." The New Jersey Star Ledger (November 21, 2002) online.]

[Request #S6812]

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Instructional Models for Early Childhood Education. By Susan L. Godbeck. ERIC Digest EDO-PS-02-10. (ERIC Clearinghouse on Elementary and Early Childhood Education, Champaign, Illinois) September 2002. 2 p.

Full Text at: www.ericeece.org/pubs/digests/2002/golbeck02.pdf

["There is no definitive best approach for teaching young children. This Digest discusses the existing approaches to early education. It also provides an overview of the research initiatives underway to examine a variety of preschool curricular approaches. Finally, it stresses the need for developmentally appropriate practices to act as the guiding force."]

[Request #S6813]

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Identifying Strategies to Support English Language Learners in Head Start and Early Head Start Programs. Proceedings from the Head Start Bureau April 9th, 2002 Focus Group on English Language Learners, Washinton, DC. (Migrant and Seasonal Head Start Quality Improvement Center, Washington, DC) April 8-9, 2002. 19 p.

Full Text at: www.mhsqic.org/init/seclang/englishlanglearners.pdf

["This paper describes the characteristics and needs of Migrant and Seasonal Head Start programs where 92% of the children enrolled in their programs speak a language other than English at home. Additionally, the paper provides specific strategies for promoting second language acquisition as well as supporting home language."]

[Request #S6814]

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EARLY EDUCATION

Data Collection For Building Early Learning Systems: Using Data For Real World Decision-Making. By Yasmina Vinci and Michelle Galvan, Nation's Network of Child Care Resource and Referral. (The Network, Washington, DC) 2002. 18 p.

Full Text at: www.naccrra.net/About/NationalCCRRData/RR_Data_Report.pdf

["This paper summarizes the sources of data available for the consumers of information on early care and education including parents, community planners, economic developers, employers, policy decision-makers, programming decision-makers, and researchers. By providing a framework for discerning the sources of data by type, advantages and disadvantages, this paper is a resource for individuals building early learning systems at the local, state and national levels."]

[Request #S6815]

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EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH

Bringing Evidence-Driven Progress to Education: A Recommended Strategy for the U.S. Department of Education. By the Coalition for Evidence-Based Policy. (The Council for Excellence in Government, Washington, DC) November 2002. 34 p.

Full Text at: www.excelgov.org/usermedia/images/uploads/PDFs/coalitionFinRpt.pdf

["This report calls for a major, department-wide effort to fund studies that randomly assign students to treatment and control groups, to establish what works in educating American children. It notes that according to the National Assessment of Educational Progress, the U.S. has made little progress in raising K-12 educational achievement over the past 30 years, and proposes randomized controlled trials as a key to improvement." The National Clearinghouse for English Language Acquisition & Language Instruction Educational Programs (NCELA) listserv (November 19, 2002).]

[Request #S6816]

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ELEMENTARY EDUCATION

Recess in Elementary School: What Does the Research Say? By Olga S. Jarrett. ERIC Digest EDO-PS-02-5. (ERIC Clearinghouse on Elementary and Early Childhood Education, Champaign, Illinois) July 2002. 2 p.

Full Text at: www.ericeece.org/pubs/digests/2002/jarrett02.pdf

["Many school systems have abolished recess since 1989. Safety and liability concerns and fears that recess will disrupt work patterns may underlie the decision to do away with recess.... This Digest discusses research on recess and its relationship to learning, social development, and child health, as well as research on related topics that have implications for recess policy such as the need for breaks and physical activity."]

[Request #S6817]

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LITERACY

Family Literacy: A Strategy for Educational Improvement. Issue Brief. By the National Governor's Association Center for Best Practices. (The Association, Washington, DC) November 8, 2002. 11 p.

Full Text at: www.nga.org/cda/files/110802LITERACY.pdf

["According to this brief, seventy-three percent of children whose mothers are college graduates are read aloud to every day compared to only 42% of children whose mothers failed to complete high school. The brief discusses how governors are incorporating family literacy strategies into their education agendas." Education Commission of the States, ECS e-Connection (November 13, 2002) 1.]

[Request #S6818]

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SCHOOL READINESS

Children's Readiness for School: Toward a Strategic Policy Framework. [Issue Theme.] News & Issues. Vol. 12, No. 3. (National Center for Children in Poverty, New York, New York) Fall 2002. 12 p.

Full Text at: www.nccp.org/news/fall02/Fall02.pdf

[This issue discusses the components integral to ensuring that young children enter school ready to learn, including family economic security, nurturing early relationships, child care subsidy policies, early mental health interventions, and meaningful indicators to track commitments to young children. It highlights programmatic and policy opportunities to create a strategic school readiness framework to help children."]

[Request #S6819]

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HEALTH

CHILDREN

Reasons and Strategies for Strengthening Childhood Development Services in the Healthcare System. By Karen VanLandeghem and others, National Academy for State Health Policy. (The Academy, Portland, Maine) October 2002. 35 p.

Full Text at: www.cmwf.org/programs/child/vanlandeghem_nashp_O03.pdf

["This study focuses on encouraging states to work more closely with primary pediatric providers to help identify at-risk children, counsel parents, and refer children with serious behavioral and developmental problems for additional social services in the community. Coordinating efforts in primary care settings, community agencies, and state offices improve early childhood development services, policies, and practices." Child Health Information Project (November 8, 2002).]

[Request #S6820]

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MENTAL HEALTH

Interim Report of the President's New Freedom Commission on Mental Health. By the President's New Freedom Commission on Mental Health. (The Commission, Washington, DC) 2002. 22 p.

Full Text at: www.mentalhealthcommission.gov/reports/Interim_Report.htm

["This report recommends improvements in the U.S. mental health system and highlights public and private policies that could be implemented by Federal, State, and local governments.... The report also highlights a variety of model programs that address the mental health needs of children and adolescents." Children's Defense Fund's, Child Health Information Project listserv (November 8, 2002).]

[Request #S6821]

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HUMAN SERVICES

ADOPTION

"Supporting Loving Families: After the Adoption." By Kristen Kreisher, Child Welfare League of America. IN: Children's Voice (November/December 2002) 7 p.

Full Text at: www.cwla.org/articles/cv0211supporting.htm

["Increasingly, families formed through adoption are finding they want help dealing with their complex issues and needs, and child- and family-serving agencies nationwide are trying to create, improve, and tailor services to meet those needs. How to pay for services and make postadoption support available to everyone who seeks it, however, remains a challenge."]

[Request #S6822]

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CHILD CARE

Caring For Children in Tough Times: Background For Discussion of California Child Care Policy Options. By Sujatha Branch and others, Child Care Law Center. (The Center, San Francisco, California) November 2002. 36 p.

Full Text at: www.childcarelaw.org/memoranda/caringforchildren.pdf

["This analysis provides background information on California's subsidized child care system. Child care is a dramatically under-resourced system, one in which cuts can be made only at the cost of children's safety and development. It looks at financing in a comprehensive manner. The boom and bust nature of state revenue does not lend itself to intelligent planning and policymaking, and as such, it is critical that advocates look at revenue policy while developing their budget and policy agendas."

[Request #S6823]

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Child Care Experiences of Former TANF Recipients. By Andrea Wilkins, National Conference of State Legislatures. Welfare Reform Series. (NCSL, Denver, Colorado) 2002. 10 p.

Full Text at: www.ncsl.org/statefed/welfare/ccbrief.pdf

["Legislators in some states have established financing mechanisms and incentives to expand child care services. The findings can provide insight about the continuing concerns of former recipients and help states develop appropriate policies to ensure that parents have the child care resources necessary if they are to find and retain employment. Policy options to better serve the child care needs are listed."]

[Request #S6824]

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The Little Engine That Hasn't: The Poor Performance of Employer Tax Credits For Child Care. By Christina Smith FitzPatrick and Nancy Duff Campbell, National Women's Law Center. (The Center, Washington, DC) November 2002. 68 p.

Full Text at: www.nwlc.org/pdf/TheLittleEngine2002.pdf

["While most states allow companies tax credits to offset part of the cost of helping their employees pay for child care, this study shows few companies take advantage of these credits by providing such benefits. This report studied 20 states in which data about child care credits were readily available. In five of these states, no companies applied for the credit. In 11 others, fewer than five companies did so." New York Times (November 18, 2002).]

[Request #S6825]

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The Economic Impact of the Child Care Industry in Santa Clara County: Early Care and Education and Programs for School-Age Youth. By the National Economic Development and Law Center. Prepared for the Local Child Care Planning Council of Santa Clara County, Local Investment in Child Care Project. (The Center, Oakland, California) November 2002. 51 p.

Full Text at: www.childcareoptions.org/pdf/SCEIR.pdf

["This study is a comprehensive analysis of the licensed early care and education industry, before- and after-school programs for school-age children, and summer enrichment programs for all ages.... The licensed child care industry generates $331 million in gross receipts annually in Santa Clara County." Silicon Valley/San Jose Business Journal (November 12, 2002) 1.]

[Request #S6826]

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CHILDREN

Runaway/Thrownaway Children: National Estimates and Characteristics. By Heather Hammer, Temple University Institute for Survey Research, and others. Prepared for the U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. (The Department, Washington, DC) October 2002. 12 p.

Full Text at: www.ncjrs.org/pdffiles1/ojjdp/196469.pdf

["The series offers national estimates of missing children based on surveys of households, juvenile residential facilities, and law enforcement agencies. It also presents statistical profiles of these children, including their demographic characteristics and the circumstances of their disappearance."]

[Request #S6827]

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Poverty, AIDS and Children's Schooling: A Targeting Dilemma. By Martha Ainsworth and Deon Filmer, Development Research Group World Bank. (The Group, Washington, DC) 2002. 44 p.

Full Text at: econ.worldbank.org/files/18719_wps2885.pdf

[“One of the most frequently expressed concerns is that school-aged orphans will be forced to drop out of school or will never enroll. This has prompted calls for governments to subsidize the schooling of orphans. In 1997, at least 67.5 million primary-aged children were not in school worldwide, of which 58 million were living in low-income countries, 31.5 million were living in South Asia and 25 million were living in sub-Saharan Africa.”]

[Request #S6828]

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FOSTER CARE

Foster Care Dynamics in Urban and Non-Urban Counties. By Fred H. Wulczyn and Kristin Brunner Hislop, the Chapin Hall Center for Children at the University of Chicago. (The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Washington, DC) 2002. Various pagings.

Full Text at: aspe.hhs.gov/hsp/fostercare-issues02/dynamics/index.htm

["This study reveals that the experiences of children in foster care vary depending on whether they live in primary urban areas ... secondary urban areas ... or non-urban counties.... One finding showed that placements in urban areas tend to be longer.... Their findings could aid in the development of more targeted prevention and service programs." National Clearinghouse on Child Abuse and Neglect Information's Children Bureau Express (November 8, 2002) online.]

[Request #S6829]

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PARENTS

Married and Unmarried Parenthood and Economic Well-Being: A Dynamic Analysis of a Recent Cohort. By Robert I. Lerman, Urban Institute and American University. (The Institute, Washington, DC) 2002. 52 p.

Full Text at: www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/410540_Parenthood.pdf

["This paper examines the dynamics of marriage and family patterns and their relationship to living standards of a recent cohort of mothers.... Using a variety of statistical techniques, the study finds that marriages, even shotgun marriages, significantly raise both the level and stability of living standards experienced by mothers and their children."]

[Request #S6830]

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POVERTY

Race, Ethnicity, and the Gender-Poverty Gap. By Yuval Elmelech, Bard College and the Center for the Study of Wealth and Inequality, Columbia University, and Hsien-Hen Lu, the National Center for Children in Poverty and Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University. Working Paper No. 351. (The Levy Economics Institute, Annandale-on-Hudson, New York) 2002. 29 p.

Full Text at: www.levy.org/docs/wrkpap/pdf/351.pdf

["The analysis reveals that sociodemographic characteristics have a distinct effect on the poverty rate of minority women, and that the form and the magnitude of the effect vary across racial/ethnic lines. Incorporating the newly available immigration information in the CPS data enables the authors to document the effect of immigration status on gender inequality. The social and economic implications of the findings for the study of gender inequality are also addressed."]

[Request #S6831]

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STUDIES TO COME
[The following studies, reports, and documents have been ordered or requested, but have not yet arrived. Requests may be placed, and copies will be provided when the material arrives.]

EDUCATION

MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION

Our Roots, Our Future: Affirming Culture and Language in After School and Youth Programs. By Jhumpa Bhattacharya and others. (California Tomorrow, Oakland, California) October 2002. 112 p.

["This book contains stories of promising practices along with a set of practical tools and activities to support program reflection and development. Included are the voices of youth and a framework speaking to the importance of culture and language in the lives of young people." NOTE: Our Roots, Our Future ... will be available for 3-day loan.]

[Request #S6832]

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HEALTH

DENTAL CARE

"Relationship Between Children's Dental Needs and Dental Care Utilization: 1988-1994." By Clemencia M. Vargas and Cynthia R. Ronzio. IN: American Journal of Public Health, vol. 92 (November 11, 2002) pp. 1816-1821.

["Based on the results of this study, the authors recommend reducing barriers at the provider level by "guaranteeing adequate payment through Medicaid and State Children's Health Insurance Program payments, training more pediatric dentists, particularly those from racial/ethnic minority groups, and offering incentives for dental care providers to practice in underserved areas." Child Health Information Project, Children's Defense Fund (November 15, 2002).]

[Request #S6833]

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