Subject: Studies in the News 02-74 (December 12, 2002)


CALIFORNIA RESEARCH BUREAU
CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY
Studies in the News


California -- One Hundred and Fifty Years Ago

December 10, 1852 - "10,000 people turned out to watch the first legal hanging in San Francisco. Jose Forner was hanged from gallows built on the slope of Russian Hill. "  http://www.sfmuseum.org/hist/chron3.html  

December 13, 1852 - "We consider the jail deficient for the legitimate purposes of a jail. We find it insecure, uncleanly and that the necessary bed clothing is not furnished prisoners. [Grand Jury presentment was made to the District Court on December 13, 1852. The jail was at Martinez and was the only jail within the confines of the area now embraced by both Alameda and Contra Costa County.] "  http://www.cocohistory.com/bray-38-02-22.html  

Contents This Week

Introductory Material CALIFORNIA READER
   Disparities in neighborhoods
   Legal aid for poor lagging
CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT
   Change in crime rates
   Hate crimes after September 11
   Wiretaps allowed without probable cause
   Youth violence prevention scorecard
CULTURE AND SOCIETY
   New Hispanic ministry framework
DEMOGRAPHY
   Latinos transfer funds out of U.S.
ECONOMY
   Economy stalled in recession
   Information technology productivity
   Conflicting interests in digital divide
   Decision on securities arbitration rules
EDUCATION
   Affirmative-action replacement policies
   Trends in college pricing
   College online education
   Improving educational profile of Latino immigrants
   Mathematics education in U.S. declining
ENERGY
   Nevada sues energy companies for conspiracy
   Retrospective on energy crisis
ENVIRONMENT & NATURAL RESOURCES
   Health impacts of power plant emissions
   Use of clean energy
   State government and climate change
   Public attitudes on land use
   Court blocks coastal oil drilling
   Salton Sea agreement
   Profiting from water
   Economic analysis of vernal pools
GENERAL GOVERNMENT
   Federal grant update
   State sponsored gambling
    Department of Information demise
   States' financial situation
   Cigarette taxation
   State deficit looming
   Mid-year budget reduction proposal
   States' overspending
   Dismal state of government finance
   Tax cuts affect state services
   Ballot trends and spending priorities
HEALTH
   Lack of transportation to health care
   Air pollution and medical costs
   Hormones and Alzheimer's
   Growth hormones and healthy people
   Free rein for states' tobacco funds
HUMAN SERVICES
   Ethics of American youth
   Holistic view of teenagers
   Child support in low-income families
   Child living arrangements
   Few adults relate to children positively
   States' spending on TANF
   Employment and welfare
TRANSPORTATION
   Airport screeners allowed to sue government
   Transportation plan for San Diego region
   Hazardous material transportation grants
   Relief for damaged infrastructure
STUDIES TO COME
   Vision for downtown Los Angeles
   Bridging the achievement gap
   Uninsured utilizing community health centers
   Health insurance and birth weight outcomes
Introduction to Studies in the News

Studies in the News is a very current compilation of items significant to the Legislature and Governor's Office. It is created weekly by the State Library's Research Bureau to supplement the public policy debate in California’s Capitol. To help share the latest information with state policymakers, these reading lists are now being made accessible through the State Library’s website. This week's list of current articles in various public policy areas is presented below.

Service to State Employees:

  • When available, the URL for the full text of each item is provided.

  • Items in the State Library collection can be checked out to state officials and staff.

  • Access to all materials listed will be provided by the State Information Reference Center, either by e-mail to cslsirc@library.ca.gov or by calling 654-0261.

The following studies are currently on hand:

CALIFORNIA READER

CALIFORNIA READER

California's Index of Inclusion, 2002: A Preliminary Report. By the Joint Committee on Preparing California for the 21st Century. 1179-S. (The Committee, Sacramento, California) 2002. 68 p.

["The goal is to demonstrate the continued disparities in neighborhoods, schools, health care systems and employment opportunities that still exist in California and to challenge a coalition to address the issues and work together to bring about changes."]

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The Path to Equal Justice: A Five-Year Report on Access to Justice in California. By the California Commission on Access to Justice, State Bar of California. (The Commission, San Francisco, California) October 2002. 90 p.; Appendices.

Full Text at: www.calbar.ca.gov/calbar/pdfs/accessjustice/2002-Access-Justice-Report.pdf

["Legal Aid to the Poor Falls Short: The state has made improvements, but the unmet need for help in civil matters remains large, state bar finds: The state spends considerably less than several other major industrial states and has many fewer lawyers available to serve the poor. Nearly 1.5 million poor families in California do not have access to lawyers." Los Angeles Times (November 21, 2002. 1.]

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CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT

CRIME RATE

Crime in the United States – 2001. By Federal Bureau of Investigation. Department of Justice. (The Department, Washington, DC) 2002. 17 p.

Full Text at: www.fbi.gov/ucr/cius_01/01crime.pdf

[“For the first time since 1991, serious and violent crime in the United States increased last year, the FBI reported. The bureau’s annual … report found that murder, the crime that is best measured because it is least likely to go unreported, rose 2.5 percent nationwide…. At the same time, robberies climbed 3.7 percent, burglaries 2.9 percent, petty thefts 1.5 percent and motor vehicle thefts 5.7 percent.” San Francisco Chronicle (October 29, 2002) A4.]

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HATE CRIMES

"We Are Not The Enemy: Hate Crimes Against Arabs, Muslims, and Those Perceived to be Arab or Muslim after September 11.” IN: Human Rights Watch, vol. 14, no 6 (November 2002) pp. 1-42.

Full Text at: www.hrw.org/reports/2002/usahate/usa1102.pdf

[“A human rights group commended the swift state and federal response to increased hate crimes against Muslims after the Sept 11 attacks but said government should have anticipated the wave of violence and taken steps to head it off…. The report … documented a 17 fold increase in hate crimes against Muslims in six cities with large Arab populations or large numbers of hate crimes…. The FBI said Los Angeles County reported that anti-Arab hate crimes shot up from 12 in 2000 to 188 in 2001, slightly below the six-city average.” Los Angeles Times (November 14, 2002) 28.]

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PRIVACY & SECURITY

In re: Sealed Case No. 02-001. United States Intelligence Surveillance Court of Review. 02-001. November 18, 2002. 56 p.

Full Text at: www.epic.org/privacy/terrorism/fisa/FISCR_opinion.pdf

["Court Widens Wiretapping in Terror Cases; Panel Lowers the 'Wall' Between Intelligence Agencies and the FBI: 'There is simply no basis [in law] to limit criminal prosecutors' ability to advise FBI intelligence officials' on undertaking searches or sharing the results -- and vice versa, the review court said." Los Angeles Times (November 19, 2002) A1.]

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YOUTH

California Youth Violence Prevention Scorecard. By Choices for Youth. (Choices, San Francisco, California) November 2002. 39 p.

Full Text at: www.preventviolence.org/download/Score11_8.pdf

["Several [California] counties received lackluster grades on a statewide survey ... measuring their progress toward preventing youth violence.... It's clear that we need more after-school programs, job-training mentoring and other adult-supervised activities to help prevent violence against youth across the state." San Francisco Chronicle (November 14, 2002) A19.]

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CULTURE AND SOCIETY

LATINOS

Encuentro and Mission: A Renewed Pastoral Framework for Hispanic Ministry. By U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. (The Conference, Washington, DC) November 2002. Various pagings.

Full Text at: www.usccb.org/bishops/index.htm

[“The nation’s Roman Catholic bishops approved a new plan … for ministering to Latinos, a reflection of both the growing presence of Latinos in the church and the competition for their religious loyalties...The new ministry plan.... calls for incorporating Latinos into the life and leadership of the church and grooming them for leadership positions." Los Angeles Times (November 13, 2002) 1.]

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DEMOGRAPHY

Billions in Motion: Latino Immigrants, Remittances and Banking. By the Pew Hispanic Center (The Center, Washington, DC) November 22, 2002. 28 p.

Full Text at: www.pewhispanic.org/index.jsp

["Millions of Mexican and Central American immigrants in the United States continue to send billions of dollars annually to relatives in their native countries...The amount of money is projected to hit more than $18 billion by the end of 2005." Sacramento Bee (November 23, 2002) A12.]

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ECONOMY

CALIFORNIA

The UCLA Anderson Forecast for the Nation and California. By the UCLA Anderson Forecasting Project, Anderson Graduate School of Management. And Quarterly Business Forecast Seminar: Packet. By Tom Lieser, Anderson Graduate School of Management, and others. (The School, Los Angeles, California) December 2002. Various pagings.

["Hobbled by a battered technology sector, slumping exports, a weak job market and a staggering budget deficit, the state won't see anything close to a normal growth until 2004 at the soonest, according to the quarterly UCLA Anderson Forecast. In contrast to the nation's economy, which appears to be inching forward in low gear, the Golden State appears to be stalled in a recession with no signs of strong acceleration." Los Angeles Times (December 5, 2002) 1.]

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INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

Riding the IT Wave: Surging Productivity Growth in the West. By May Daly, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco. FRBSF Economic Letter. No. 2002-34. (The Bank, San Francisco) November 15, 2002. 4 p.

["This letter documents the recent productivity performance in terms of growth rates and examines the sectors contributing to the West's exceptional surge. The results show that, as in the nation, productivity growth in the District accelerated in most regions and sectors.... Much of the credit goes to the relatively rapid productivity growth in sectors related to information technology."]

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"Digital Divide." By Drew Clark and Bara Vaida, National Journal Technology Daily. IN: California Journal (November 2002) pp. 6-17.

["Hollywood versus Silicon Valley: The two titan industries are locked in a struggle over copyright issues and the Internet. The battle has pulled in Washington lawmakers and regulators.... The tech sector had chalked up past legislative victories, but had never faced such a determined and politically connected adversary as Hollywood."]

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SECURITIES INDUSTRY

NASD Dispute Resoulution, Inc., et al. v. Judicial Council of California, et al. U.S. District Court, Northern District of California. C-02-3486-SC. November 12, 2002. Various pagings.

["A federal judge tossed out a lawsuit challenging California's new ethics rules for securities arbitrators, the people who rule on most investor complaints against investment brokers. But while a lawyer for the state called the decision 'a big victory for consumers,' it doesn't resolve the estimated 3,000 securities arbitration cases that have been piling up in California since July." Sacramento Bee (November 13, 2002) D2.]

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EDUCATION

AFFIRMATIVE ACTION

Beyond Percentage Plans: The Challenge of Equal Opportunity in Higher Education. By U.S. Commission on Civil Rights Office for Civil Rights Evaluation. (The Commission, Washington, DC) November 2002. 127 p.

Full Text at: www.usccr.gov/pubs/percent2/percent2.pdf

[“The new University of California policy that guarantees admission to the top 4 percent of graduates at each California high school does not make campuses more diverse…. Minority students in California … are faring worse or no better than they were under affirmative-action programs that the new policy replaced, according to the report.” Associated Press (November 20, 2002) 1.]

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HIGHER EDUCATION

Trends in College Pricing: 2002. By The College Board. (The Board, New York, New York) 2002. 24 p.

Full Text at: www.collegeboard.com/press/cost02/html/CBTrendsPricing02.pdf

[“College tuition and fees continued to rise faster than the cost of living this year, as the sluggish economy hit college and university endowments hard and reduced state contributions to higher education, according to a report…. Overall, it now costs about $25,000 for tuition, room and board at a private college and nearly $10,000 for the same thing at public institutions. San Francisco Chronicle (October 22, 2002) A1.]

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INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

"Lessons Learned." By Tod Newcombe. IN: Government Technology, (September 2002) pp. 10-12; 36+.

Full Text at: www.govtech.net/magazine/story.phtml?id=3030000000021503&issue=09:2002

["Online education was considered a sure hit for students and universities hoping to make or save some money. It hasn't quite worked out that way.... Online education does work when colleges and universities take the time to figure out their own strengths and assess the market they want to serve.... Technology continues to get better and demand for individual courses and degrees keeps growing."

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LATINOS

The Improving Educational Profile of Latino Immigrants. By B. Lindsay Lowell and Roberto Suro, Pew Hispanic Center. (The Center, Washington, DC) December 4, 2002. 29 p.

Full Text at: www.pewhispanic.org/site/docs/pdf/Immig%20Ed%2012-04-02%20Final.pdf

["The Latino immigrant population had made significant strides in improving its educational profile.... They are much better educated than they were three decades ago, and that is likely to continue....Further, the study notes that levels of educational achievement have improved in sending countries, and those who choose to migrate to the United States are better educated than those who stay behind." Fresno Bee (December 5, 2002) A1.]

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MATHEMATICS

"Add It Up: Mathematics Education in the U.S. Does Not Compute." By Kati Haycock and Lynn A. Steen. Thinking K-16. Vol. 6, Issue 1. (Education Trust, Washington, DC) Summer 2002. 24 p.

Full Text at: www.edtrust.org/main/documents/k16_summer02.pdf

["According to this Education Trust analysis of math education and achievement, there is a vicious cycle limiting U.S. students’ math achievement. The lack of good math teachers leads to fewer math majors, which leads to fewer good math teachers to teach new students. Nationally, 61 percent of all middle grade students are taught mathematics by teachers who did not themselves study enough mathematics to earn even a minor in math or related fields. Rates are even higher in schools serving low-income and minority students." Connect For Kids Weekly (November 18, 2002)]

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ENERGY

State of Nevada v. El Paso Corporation, et al. District Court, Clark County Nevada. A458583. Complaint for Class Actions. November 1, 2002. Various pagings.

["Nevada's attorney general has sued El Paso Corp. and Sempra Energy, accusing the companies of conspiring with Enron Corp. and others to squeeze natural gas supplies to Nevada and California during the energy crisis of 2000-01 to inflate energy prices.... The antitrust lawsuit mirrors lawsuits filed in California that claim that El Paso and Sempra, parent of Southern California Gas Co. and San Diego Gas & Electric Co., agreed to refrain from competing with each other by limiting expansion of competing pipelines." [San Francisco Chronicle (November 6, 2002) C2.]

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UTILITIES

The $10 Billion Jolt: California's Energy Crisis: Cowardice, Greed, Stupidity and the Death of Deregulation. By James Walsh. (Silver Lake Publishing, Los Angeles, California) 2002. 366 p.

["The inefficiencies that remain in a part of the electrical utility business will call out for deregulation -- even another attempt in California, at some point. At that point, perhaps further development in metering and billing technology ... and greater sophistication on the part of consumers ... will allow true deregulation to flourish. In the meantime, California and the Western states have to live with higher electricity prices than the rest of the country. These are the consequences of the failure of the California Plan."]

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ENVIRONMENT & NATURAL RESOURCES

AIR POLLUTION

Particulate-Related Health Impacts of Emissions in 2001 From 41 Major U.S. Power Plants. By Abt Associates. (The Environmental Integrity Project, Rockefeller Family Fund, Washington, DC) November 2002. 59 p.

Full Text at: www.rffund.org/eip/docs/PMHealthImpact2001.pdf

["This study estimates that between 4,800 and 5,600 premature deaths in 2001 were associated with the emissions from the 41 plants. In addition to the premature mortality, it also estimates that 3,000 hospital admissions or emergency room visits, 930,000 work loss days, 111,000 asthma attacks, and other health effects are associated with the emissions from the 41 plants."]

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Clean Energy at the Crossroads: Charting the Potential for Renewable Energy in Los Angeles. By Eli Richlin and Bernadette Del Chiaro. (California Public Interest Research Group, Los Angeles, California) November 2002. 20 p.

Full Text at: calpirg.org/reports/energyreport.doc

["A consumer group branded the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power 'the dirtiest municipal utility west of the Mississippi,' citing its reliance on coal and nuclear power to provide customers with electricity.... Only 2% of the city utility's electricity came from so-called renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar power, compared with an average of 12% statewide, the group said in its report." Los Angeles Times (November 15, 2002) B4.]

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CLIMATE CHANGE

Greenhouse and Statehouse: The Evolving State Government Role in Climate Change. By Barry G. Rabe, University of Michigan. Prepared for the Pew Center on Global Climate Change. (The Center, Arlington, Virginia) November 2002. 46 p.

Full Text at: www.pewclimate.org/projects/states_greenhouse.pdf

["With the Bush administration and Congress deadlocked over how best to combat the mounting threat of global warming, state officials across the country are taking matters into their own hands.... Many state officials consider global warming a direct threat to their economies and their citizens' health. Washington Post (November 11, 2002) A3.]

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GROWTH MANAGEMENT

PPIC Statewide Survey: Special Survey on Land Use: Part of the Growth, Land Use, and Environment Series. By Mark Baldassare, Public Policy Institute fo California (The Institute, San Francisco, California) November 2002. 39 p.

Full Text at: www.ppic.org/publications/CalSurvey32/survey32.pdf

["Growth and development was listed as a problem by 63 percent of those surveyed, and air pollution was listed by 60 percent. Survey respondents generally were pleased with their surroundings, however. Eighty-nine percent said they were either very or somewhat satisfied with the neighborhood in which they live." The Sacramento Bee (November 14, 2002) A3]

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OCEAN RESOURCES

State of California, et al. v. Gale Norton, et al. U.S. Court of Appeals, Ninth Circuit. 01-16637, 01-16690. December 2, 2002. Various pagings

["A federal appeals court effectively blocked new oil drilling off the California coast in the near future by upholding a lower court decision that state officials must first scrutinize drilling plans for environmental hazards. It continues to freeze all drilling plans on undeveloped tracts in federal waters off the state's coastline until the California Coastal Commission reviews their impact on the ocean, the shoreline and marine life." Los Angeles Times (December 3, 2002) 1.]

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SALTON SEA

Finding of the Department of Fish and Game With Respect to Implementation of the Quantification Settlement Agreement and the Salton Sea: Draft. By the California Department of Fish and Game. (The Department, Sacramento, California) November 27, 2002. 11 p.

Full Text at: www.dfg.ca.gov/html/dfgsalinityfinding.pdf

["The proposed plan to cut California's use of Colorado River water, which includes transferring water from the Imperial Valley to San Diego, won't hurt the Salton Sea in the first 15 years, a state agency concluded in a report.... Tom Kirk, executive director of the Salton Sea Authority, said the assessment fails to consider the long-term impact of the water transfer on the sea." The Desert Sun (December 4, 2002) 1.]

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WATER POLICY

"Water for Profit: The Price of Water [Series]." By Jon Luoma. And "South Africa's Driest Season." By Jon Jeter. IN: Mother Jones, vol. 27, no. 6 (November/December 2002) pp. 24-45, 88.

["Corporate managed waterworks were supposed to save money and improve services. [The first] article explores the situation in Atlanta and other cities around the world to illustrate that water and profits don't always mix.... South Africa's attempt to privatize has led to clean drinking water for those who can afford it, and cholera for those who cannot."]

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WETLANDS

Economic Analysis of Critical Habitat Designation for Vernal Pool Species: Draft Report. By Economic and Planning Systems, Inc. Prepared for Division of Economics, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. (The Service, Arlington, Virginia) October 28, 2002. 130 p.

Full Text at: sacramento.fws.gov/ea/Documents/Draft%20Vernal%20Pool%20Species%20EA%20rev.pdf

["The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposed in September that the land be designated as critical habitat to protect 15 species of plants and shrimp that depend on the seasonally flooded pools for survival. Such a designation would cost private landowners and public agencies between $5.4 million and $11.9 million in administrative costs and up to $122.9 million to modify projects, said the service's draft economic analysis....The public comment period on the proposal has been extended to Dec. 23." San Diego Union-Tribune (November 22, 2002)A1.]

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GENERAL GOVERNMENT

FEDERAL GRANTS

Competitive Grant Update. By Federal Funds Information for States. FFIS Competitive Grant, 02-11. (FFIS, Washington, DC) November 25, 2002. 6. p

["Includes availability of funds for: Federal-State Marketing Improvement Program ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Ocean Exploration Initiative ... Vocational Rehabilitation Service Projects ... Advanced Communications and Controls Program ... Basic Nurse Education and Practice Grants ... [and others]."]

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GAMBLING

Soaking the Poor: The Incidence of State-Sponsored Gambling. By Bernard Wasow, The Century Foundation. (The Foundation, New York, New York) November 14, 2002. 2 p.

Full Text at: www.tcf.org/Publications/Issue_Briefs/lotterybrief.pdf

["With many states suffering tax shortfalls and budget deficits, state-sponsored gambling again is offering a temptingly easy source of new revenue. Some argue that state-sponsored lotteries, slot machines and other gambling opportunities simply give the local governments the gambling profits that otherwise would have gone elsewhere, to other states or to the illegal gambling industry."]

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INFORMATION TECHNOLGY

"End of the Line." By Shane Peterson. IN: Government Technology, (October 2002) pp. 18-22+

Full Text at: www.govtech.net/magazine/story.phtml?id=25335

["The Department of Information Technology (DOIT) seems to have fallen prey to three powerful forces -- politics, performance and perception -- that, over time, exerted sufficient pressure to snuff out the agency's life. The quirks of California politics may have played a significant role in DOIT's demise, but what happened to the agency offers a lesson for any jurisdiction on what not to do when creating a strong, centralized IT department."]

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PUBLIC FINANCE

The Fiscal Survey of States. By the National Governors Association and the National Association of State Budget Officers. (The Associations, Washington, DC) November 2002. 68 p.

Full Text at: www.nga.org/cda/files/NOV2002FISCALSURVEY.pdf

["The NGA and the NASBO report that the states are facing their most dire fiscal situation in 60 years. The failure of Congress to pass a state fiscal relief package in 2002 means even more budget cuts are likely in 2003, limiting states' ability to strengthen local economies and help families affected by a weak recovery. 'The combination of long-run deterioration in state tax systems coupled with an explosion of health care costs are creating an imbalance between revenue and spending,' says NGA Executive Director Raymond C. Scheppach." Connect for Kids (December 2, 2002)]

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REVENUE AND TAXATION

Who Profits By Far the Most From Cigarettes? Government. By Tommy J. Payne, R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. IN: Cal-Tax Digest, vol 6, no. 8 (October 2002) 1 p.

Full Text at: www.caltax.org/member/digest/oct2002/10.2002.Payne-WhoProfitsFromCigarette.03.htm

["State and federal governments have a virtual monopoly on the profits from the sale of cigarettes. They make more money on each pack of cigarettes sold than anyone in the business -- including the manufacturers.... California's smokers, who comprise only 17.2 percent of the state's population, paid more than $2.2 billion in cigarette-related revenue to the state in 2001."]

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STATE BUDGET

California's Fiscal Outlook: The LAO's Projections, 2002-03 Through 2007-08. By the Legislative Analyst's Office. (The Office, Sacramento, California) November 2002. 46 p.

Full Text at: www.lao.ca.gov/2002/fiscal_outlook/fiscal_outlook_2002.pdf

["Lawmakers thought they had closed a $24 billion shortfall with a budget that largely protected schools, senior programs, public safety, and children's health care using a combination of cuts, borrowing and account shifts that aren't available next year. In reality, Legislative Analyst, Elizabeth Hill says this year's budget will come up $6 billion short in revenues, and another $15 billion shortfall looms next year." San Francisco Chronicle(November 15, 2002) A21.]

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Mid-Year Spending Reduction Proposals. By the Department of Finance. (The Department, Sacramento, California) December 2002. 35 p.

Full Text at: www.dof.ca.gov/HTML/BUD_DOCS/midyr02.pdf

["Gov. Gray Davis proposed slashing spending from hundreds of state programs, outlining deep cuts in public education, health care and other areas as part of a $10.2-billion package of midyear budget reductions and other savings. The announcement unleashed a fierce debate over California's priorities in the face of a projected deficit of more than $21 billion." Los Angeles Times (December 7, 2002) A1.]

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STATE BUDGETS

Did States Overspend During the 1990s? By Elizabeth C. McNichol and Kevin Carey, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (The Center, Washington, DC) October 15, 2002. 15 p.

Full Text at: www.cbpp.org/10-15-02sfp.pdf

["A new study shows the current crises are largely not the result of a spending explosion, as claimed in a recent report card on the governors. In fact, spending growth was lower in the 1990s than in previous decades, despite rising health care costs and growing school enrollment." U.S. Newswire (October 9, 2002) 1.]

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States Cut Spending in FY 2002 and FY 2003: Additional Cuts Likely Unless New Revenues are Raised. By Kevin Carey, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (The Center, Washington, DC) October 22, 2002. 13 p.

Full Text at: www.cbpp.org/10-15-02sfp2.pdf

["Center Briefings on Dismal State of Government Finances: The study shows that spending in the current crisis dropped precipitously, state spending grew by 1 percent in fiscal 2002 and is projected to grow by less than 2 percent in 2002." U.S. Newswire (October 9, 2002) 1.]

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TAXES

The State Tax Cuts of the 1990s, the Current Revenue Crisis, and Implications for State Services. By Nicholas Johnson, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. (The Center, Washington, DC) November 18, 2002. 28 p.

Full Text at: www.cbpp.org/11-14-02sfp.pdf

["A report from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities finds that large tax cuts enacted in the 1990s are costing states more than $40 billion per year, a cost that no longer seems affordable now that states are cutting back on services." HandsNet (November 18, 2002)]

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VOTERS & VOTING

How Race, Ethnicity, and Immigration Shape the California Electorate. By Jack Citrin and Benjamin Highton, Public Policy Institute of California. (The Institute, San Francisco, California) 2002. 120 p.

Full Text at: www.ppic.org/publications/PPIC166/ppic166fulltext.pdf

["According to a new analysis of ballot box trends, minority voting rates in California are so low that even by 2040, when nonwhites will be two-thirds of the state's population, whites could still represent a majority of voters....This 'electoral gap' is of lasting consequence for everything from social policy to spending priorities." Sign on San Diego.com, The San Diego Tribune (December 5, 2002) A1.]

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HEALTH

ACCESS TO CARE

Roadblocks to Health: Transportation Barriers to Healthy Communities. By Transportation and Land Use Coalition. (The Coalition, Oakland, California) 2002. Various pagings.

Full Text at: www.transcoalition.org/library/reports/roadblocks/roadblocks_exec.html

[“Thousands of low-income residents from downtown San Jose and East Bay suburbs have been left stranded by public transportation, unable to get to hospitals and medical appointments, according to a report…. Only 28 percent of residents in Alameda County’s disadvantaged neighborhoods have transit access to a hospital, leaving more than 160,000 people without access…. The report called for bringing low-income residents into the decision-making process for public transit planning.” San Francisco Chronicle (October 25, 2002) A1.]

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AIR POLLUTION

"Air Pollution and Medical Care Use By Older Americans." By Victor R. Fuchs and Sarah Rosen Frank. IN: Health Affairs, vol. 21, no. 6 (November/December 2002) pp. 207-214.

["Older Americans in the most polluted parts of the country are significantly more likely to need medical treatment, particularly for lung ailments, according tho this study, which suggests reducing pollution could cut medical spending as well." FindLaw (November 12, 2002) online.]

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ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE

Hormone Replacement Therapy and Incidence of Alzheimer Disease in Older Women. By Peter P. Zandi and other. IN: JAMA: Journal of American Medical Association, vol. 288 no. 17 (November 6, 2002) pp. 2123-2129.

["Scientist reported ... that women who take estrogen to relieve the symptoms of menopause may reduce their risk of Alzheimer's disease by 41 percent or more." Sacramento Bee (Nov 6, 2002) A6.]

[Request #S6892]

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HEALTH CARE

"Growth Hormone and Sex Steroid Administration in Healthy Aged Women and Men." By Marc R. Blackman. IN JAMA: Journal of American Medical Association, vol. 288 no. 18 (November 13, 2002) 2282-2292.

["The increasingly popular use of growth hormone as a tonic for old age actually does more harm than good for older men and women, according to a new study.... Most worrisome, researchers found that a significant number of subjects developed symptoms of diabetes and glucose intolerance, conditions that are linked to higher rates of disease and disability, as well as shorter life spans." San Francisco Chronicle (November 13, 2002) A2.]

[Request #S6893]

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SMOKING

Cardenas v. Anzai. United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. 01-15297. November 18, 2002. 5 p.

["Free Rein for States with Tobacco Funds: Forty-six states are free to spend as they see fit the approximately $200 billion in settlement funds they have begun to receive as the result of a 1998 pact with tobacco companies, a federal appeals court ruled.... Some states, including California, have spent some of it to fund health insurance for low income families." Sacramento Bee (November 19, 2002) A 4.]

[Request #S6894]

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HUMAN SERVICES

ADOLESCENTS

2002 Report Card on the Ethics of American Youth. By Josephson Institute of Ethics. (The Institute, Marina del Rey, California) 2002. Various pagings.

Full Text at: www.josephsoninstitute.org/Survey2002/Report-Card-2002_data-tables.pdf

[“A national survey of 12,000 high school students … found they are cheating, lying and stealing more than ever and are less concerned about it than in the past. The survey … found that 74 percent of students admitted cheating on an exam at least once in the past year, compared with 61 percent in the institute's 1992 survey.”]

[Request #S6895]

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Building a Better Teenager: A Summary of "What Works" in Adolescent Development. By Kristin Anderson Moore and Jonathan F. Zaff. (Child Trends, Washington, DC) November 2002. 6 p.

Full Text at: www.childtrends.org/PDF/K7Brief.pdf

["Research increasingly indicates that, as a nation, we should try to build and reinforce teens' positive behaviors, instead of only targeting problems. And to be more comprehensive and effective, researchers and program and policy developers may want to approach their work with a holistic view of teens, rather than focusing exclusively on a single aspect of adolescents' lives."]

[Request #S6896]

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CHILD SUPPORT

Child Support: An Important but Often Overlooked Issue for Low-Income Clients. By Paula Roberts, Center for Law and Social Policy. (The Center, Washington, DC) November 2002. 7 p.

Full Text at: http://www.clasp.org/DMS/Documents/1037221063.49/child%20support.pdf

["This report finds that many legal services programs assist neither custodial nor noncustodial parents in basic child support matters. Since the many local child support enforcement agencies that are left with this work struggle to provide adequate and timely service, a good argument can be made for more legal services program involvement in this area." HandsNet (November 15, 2002)]

[Request #S6897]

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CHILDREN

Child Living Arrangements By Race and Income: A Supplementary Analysis. By Wendell E. Primus. (Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, Washington, DC) November 19, 2002. 15 p.

Full Text at: www.cbpp.org/11-19-02wel.pdf

["This supplementary analysis to the study 'Declining Share of Children Lived with Single Mothers in the Late 1990s,' which the Center issued on June 15, 2001, employs an alternative methodology to provide a clearer picture of changes in living arrangements within different income groups. It also briefly discusses possible explanations for those changes." HandsNet (November 22, 2002)]

[Request #S6898]

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Grading Grown-Ups 2002: How Do American Kids and Adults Relate? Key Findings From a National Study. By Peter L. Benson and Marc Mannes. (Search Institute, Minneapolis, Minnesota) 2002. 12 p.

Full Text at: www.search-institute.org/norms/gg2002.pdf

["According to a new national study, American adults and teens have more in common than some might imagine — at least in terms of their attitudes about how adults and young people should connect. While both adults and youth from all demographic groups seem to agree on what kids need from adults, most adults don’t act on their own beliefs. The study finds that, 'Just one in 20 adults consistently relates to kids in a positive way.'" HandsNet (November 15, 2002)]

[Request #S6899]

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TEMPORARY ASSISTANCE FOR NEEDY FAMILIES

Annual TANF Expenditures Remain $2 Billion Above Block Grant. By Zoe Neuberger, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. (The Center, Washington, DC) October 30, 2002. 3 p.

Full Text at: www.cbpp.org/10-30-02wel.pdf

["This paper highlights the first available data on total TANF expenditures in fiscal year 2002. Data recently released by the Department of Treasury show that in fiscal year 2002 — as in fiscal year 2001 — states spent $2.2 billion more than they received from the basic Temporary Assistance for Needy Families block grant and $1.6 billion more than their total TANF funding, including the supplemental grants and performance bonuses some states receive."]

[Request #S6900]

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WELFARE

CalWORKS Project Research: Alcohol and Other Drug, Mental Health, and Domestic Violence Issues: Effects on Employment and Welfare Tenure After One Year. By Daniel Chandler and Joan Meisel, California Institute for Mental Health. (The Institute, Sacramento, California) October 2002. 83 p.

Full Text at: www.cimh.org/downloads/EmploymentReport.pdf

["A new CalWORKs report finds that alcohol and other drugs, and mental health and domestic violence issues significantly reduce TANF participants' chances of working." Connect for Kids Weekly (November 4, 2002)]

[Request #S6901]

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TRANSPORTATION

AIRLINE SAFETY

Jeimy Gebin, et al. v. Norman Mineta, et al. U.S. District Court, Central District of California. CV02-0493-RMT(Ex). Order Denying Motion to Dismiss for Failure to State a Claim. November 12, 2002. Various pagings

["A federal District Court judge in Los Angeles has issued a preliminary ruling siding with workers who contend that a post-Sept. 11 federal law barring noncitizens from working as airport screeners is unconstitutional.... Takasugi said that prohibiting all noncitizens -- including resident aliens -- from holding jobs as screeners 'cannot be construed as an exercise of Congress' authority in the area of immigration and naturalization.'" Los Angeles Times (November 14, 2002) B1.]

[Request #S6902]

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COMMUTERS & COMMUTING

Mobility 2030: The Transportation Plan for the San Diego Region: Exectuive Summary: Draft. By San Diego's Regional Planning Agency. (The Agency, San Diego, California) October 2002. 19 p.

Full Text at: www.sandag.org/programs/transportation/comprehensive_transportation_projects/2030rtp/2030_draft_rtp_1.pdf

["Mobility 2030 looks beyond the San Diego region to link transportation and land use planning across our borders. The last several years have seen a steady increase in interregional and international communting, as more people are choosing to live in Riverside County or Baja California, Mexico while keeping the their jobs [in the San Diego region]."]

[Request #S6903]

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FEDERAL AGENCIES

Department of Transportation Releases Hazmat Grants. By Federal Funds Information for States. FFIS Issue Brief, 02-60. (FFIS, Washington, DC) November 12, 2002. 2 p.

["Research and Special Programs Administration (RSPA) has public responsibilities for rapid reponse to emergencies by government agencies; training for transportation safety professionals; and applying science and technology to meet national transportation needs.... The October 2002 release of $12.8 million in hazardous materials and training grants is intended to help firefighters, police and other first reponders protect citizens by improving responses to hazmat incidents."]

[Request #S6904]

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FEDERAL FUNDS

Department of Transportation Releases Emergency Relief Funds. By Federal Funds Information for States. FFIS Issue Brief, 02-61. (FFIS, Washington, DC) November 18, 2002. 2 p.

[" Department of Transportation announced that $98.9 million in emergency relief funds will be provided to repair infrastructure damaged by disasters.... The funds reimburse states for both damage-repair work already completed and for remaining damage-repair work to correct major or unusual damage to federal-aid highways."]

[Request #S6909]

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STUDIES TO COME
[The following studies, reports, and documents have been ordered or requested, but have not yet arrived. Requests may be placed, and copies will be provided when the material arrives.]

CALIFORNIA READER

L.A. Now, Volume Two: Shaping a New Vision for Downtown Los Angeles: Seven Proposals. By Richard Koshalek and others. The University of California Press (Berkeley, California) 2002. Two volume.

["L.A. Now, a two-volume project its directors describe as a 'graphic snapshot' of the city at the end of the millenium.... Volume Two ... [proposes] seven ways to transform the downtown of the next century. Blueprints and CGI mock-ups present a city brimming with huge parks and interconnected by a student-friendly public transportation system created by MTA and LAUSD." Los Angeles Magazine (September 1. 2002) 112.]

[Request #S6907]

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CAMPAIGN FINANCING

CAMPAIGN FINANCING

Money, Politics, and Campaign Finance Reform Law in the States. By David Schultz, Hamline University. (Carolina Academic Press) 2002.

["State experiences suggest that ... unless the rapid growth in party independent expenditures and lobbyist activity is also addressed, donor money will continue to be an important factor in ... the policy process." Guardian (Fall 2002) 1.]

[Request #S6910]

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EDUCATION

ETHNIC, RACIAL & CULTURAL DIVERSITY

Bridging the Achievement Gap. By John E. Chubb and Tom Loveless. (Brookings Institution Press, Washington, D.C.) 2002. 236 p.

["New Book Offers Solutions to a Major Challenge in American Education: The Achievement Gap: Despite enormous progress in eliminating racial segregation, equalizing spending on schools, and toughening academic standards for schools, students have not made similar strides. After some encouraging movement in the 1970s and 1980s, the achievement gap widened in the 1990s and remains frustratingly broad today" U.S. Newswire (November 7, 2002) 1.]

[Request #S6911]

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HEALTH

ACCESS TO CARE

"Exploring the Limits of the Safety Net: Community Health Centers and Care for the Uninsured." By Michael K. Gusmano, Gerry Fairbrother, and Heidi Park. IN: Health Affairs, vol. 21, no. 6 (November/December 2002) pp. 188-194.

["This paper explores the extent to which community health centers (CHCs) are able to manage their uninsured patient caseloads. The study reports that CHCs are twice as likely to be able to provide all necessary services for their insured patients as they are for their uninsured patients.... The findings point to the limits of CHCs in providing care for the uninsured and to the increasing strain on their resources as the number of Americans without health coverage rises." The Commonwealth Fund (November 12, 2002) online.]

[Request #S6912]

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"The Role of Public Insurance and the Public Delivery System in Improving Birth Outcomes for Low-Income Pregnant Women." By M. Susan Marquis and Stephen H. Long. IN: Medical Care, v. 40, no. 11 (November 2002) pp. 1048-1059.

["In this paper, the authors describe how women enrolled in Medicaid have more prenatal care visits than the uninsured. Outcomes for those on Medicaid and the uninsured are significantly better if they receive care in the public health system than if they receive care in the private system -- including private offices, clinics, and HMOs. Findings in this article suggest that public insurance improves access to services, but the delivery system is a key factor in improving outcomes." RAND Child Policy Project Update November (November 25, 2002) 1.]

[Request #S6913]

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