Subject: Studies in the News 02-78 (December 31, 2002)


CALIFORNIA RESEARCH BUREAU
CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY
Studies in the News


California -- One Hundred and Fifty Years Ago

January 1, 2003 - "Gold exports for the year 1852 amounted to $45,587,803. "  www.sfmuseum.org/hist/chron3.html  

January 2, 1853 - "U.S. Land Commission began hearings in San Francisco to decide on the validity of claims of those holding, or attempting to hold, land under the old 'Spanish grants.' "  www.sfmuseum.org/hist/chron3.html  

Contents This Week

Introductory Material CALIFORNIA READER
   Political trends in Orange County
CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT
   California crime statistics
   Substance abuse and crime prevention act
   Judicial performance discipline
   Court upholds law on police complaints
CULTURE AND SOCIETY
   Latinos in network television
   White flight and residential segregation
DEMOGRAPHY
   Immigrants in the United States
   Self images of youth
ECONOMY
   Company headquarter location
   Investors and corporate reform
   Self-reliance for Indians
   Indian tribes and investors
   California casinos enriching tribes
   Casinos making millions for investors
   Economic impact of housing in California
   Internet usage and digital divide grow
   Court protects out-of-state Internet defendants
EDUCATION
   Implementation of "Leave No Child Behind"
   Bullying in schools
   UC housing for the 21st century
   Prepaid college tuitions
   California teacher salaries
EMPLOYMENT
   Median income and poverty
   Unemployment insurance eligibility
ENERGY
   Government intervention in the energy market
   Mitigating market power in electricity
ENVIRONMENT & NATURAL RESOURCES
   Floodplain management
   Effects of glacial melting
GENERAL GOVERNMENT
   Special interest influence
   Rebuilding California's courts
   Competitive federal grants
   New rules to accelerate tax collections
   Proposed sales and use tax solutions
   Streamlining sales tax
   Tax policy in the new economy
   Replacing punch card voting systems
   Internet voting pilot program
HEALTH
   Internet filters and health information
   Age affects cancer care
   Emergency departments in the health care system
   California's emergency departments
   California's trauma care
   Overweight children
HOUSING
   Working families and housing costs
   Smart growth housing market and segregation
   Poverty, housing and rural people
HUMAN SERVICES
   Automated child support system
   Children in poverty
   Fatherhood
   Father's influence on children
TRANSPORTATION
   Safer skies
   Traffic congestion
STUDIES TO COME
   Community child protection
   Breaking the cycles of hatred
   Sensible policies for worker absenses
   Discussion of federal open access laws
   Access to cochlear implants
Introduction to Studies in the News

Studies in the News is a very current compilation of items significant to the Legislature and Governor's Office. It is created weekly by the State Library's Research Bureau to supplement the public policy debate in California’s Capitol. To help share the latest information with state policymakers, these reading lists are now being made accessible through the State Library’s website. This week's list of current articles in various public policy areas is presented below.

Service to State Employees:

  • When available, the URL for the full text of each item is provided.

  • Items in the State Library collection can be checked out to state officials and staff.

  • Access to all materials listed will be provided by the State Information Reference Center, either by e-mail to cslsirc@library.ca.gov or by calling 654-0261.

The following studies are currently on hand:

CALIFORNIA READER

PPIC Statewide Survey: Special Survey of Orange County. By the Public Policy Institute in Collaboration with the University of California, Irvine. (PPIC, San Francisco, California) December 2002. 39 p.

Full Text at: http://www.ppic.org/publications/CalSurvey33/survey33.pdf

["Fifty-eight percent of residents rate the local economy as excellent or good -- a 16-point decline from 2001; Orange County's Latino and white residents hold different views of the region's prosperity, priorities, and politics. For example, Latinos are twice as likely as whites (48% versus 23%) to be concerned that they or someone in their family will lose their job in the next year; and, county residents are more satisfied than residents of the San Francisco Bay Area or Los Angles with their quality of life."]

[Request #S6979]

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CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT

CALIFORNIA

Crime 2002 In Selected California Jurisdictions January through June: Preliminary Report. By the Division of Criminal Justice Information Services, Department of Justice. (The Department, Sacramento, California) 2002. 3 p.

Full Text at: ag.ca.gov/cjsc/publications/preliminarys/jj02/jj02.pdf

["California cities saw a spike in homicides and other major crimes in the first half of this year, according to new figures released.... Crime rates increased in all six categories that make up the state's crime index. Homicides increased most sharply, at 16 percent, while car thefts rose 12.7 percent. Robberies were up 9.2 percent, burglaries 7.0 percent, forcible rapes 3.8 percent, and aggravated assaults 0.3 percent, according to the state." San Francisco Chronicle (December 6, 2002) 1.]

[Request #S6980]

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DRUGS

Substance Abuse and Crime Prevention Act of 2000: Proposition 36 Annual Report 2001-2002. By Alcohol and Drug Program Administration and the Department of Health Services, County of Los Angeles. (The Department, Alhambra, California) September 2002. 51 p.

Full Text at: www.lapublichealth.org/adpa/Prop36/PDF/mainfile.pdf

[“The first progress report on Proposition 36 –- the voter-approved program that allows rehab instead of jail time for drug offenders –- shows the program is helping people get clean and sober. Since it took effect … 80 percent of 8,329 drug offenders referred to Proposition 36 programs actually enrolled and are taking part.” Los Angeles Daily News (November 26, 2002) 1.]

[Request #S6981]

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LAW ENFORCEMENT

State of California Commission on Judicial Performance: Summary of Discipline Statistics: 1990-1999. By the Commission on Judicial Performance. (The Commission, San Francisco, California) 2002. 22 p.

Full Text at: cjp.ca.gov/Miscellaneous/Web%20Version.rtf

[“Elected judges are more likely to be disciplined for unethical conduct than appointed judges, according to … a study. Ethics experts suspect one reason is the elected judges get less scrutiny from voters than their appointed colleagues receive from governors, who rely on State Bar of California to vet potential appointees. Governors are also keenly aware that their political legacies are shaped in part by the quality of their appointees to the bench. ” Los Angeles Times (December 1, 2002) A1.]

[Request #S6982]

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POLICE OFFICERS

People v. Stanistreet. California Supreme Court. S102722. December 5, 2002. Various pagings.

["The California Supreme Court upheld a state law making it a crime to knowingly file a false complaint against a peace officer....The state Court of Appeal in Ventura had struck down the law, saying the constitution doesn't allow a ban on speech against police but not, for example, firefighters or teachers. The Supreme Court said the distinction was justified because state law also requires investigation and record-keeping only when police are the subjects of complaints." Sacramento Bee (December 6, 2002) A8.]

[Request #S6983]

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CULTURE AND SOCIETY

LATINOS

Network Brownout 2002: The Portrayal of Latinos in Network Television News, 2001 . By Serafin Mendez-Mendez and Diane Alverio. Prepared for the National Association of Hispanic Journalists (The Association, Washington, DC) November 2002. 16 p.

Full Text at: www.nahj.org/pdf/br2003.pdf

["Report: TV News Ignores Latinos: The booming U.S. Hispanic population has yet to be reflected in the news reports of the major broadcast networks and CNN, a new study shows. Out of about 16,000 stories on the evening newscasts of ABC, CBS, NBC and CNN last year, only 99 -- 0.62 percent -- were about Hispanics." Associated Press (December 16, 2002) 1.]

[Request #S6984]

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MULTI-ETHNIC SOCIETY

"Whites Who Say They'd Flee: Who Are They, and Why Would They Leave?" By Maria Krysan. IN: Demography, vol. 39, no. 4 (November 2002) pp. 675-696.

["Questions have been raised about whether white flight -- one factor contributing to U.S. residential segregation -- is driven by racial, race-associated, or neutral ethnocentric concerns. I use closed- and open-ended survey data from the Multi-City Study of Urban Inequality to explore who says they would leave and their reasons for doing so."]

[Request #S6985]

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DEMOGRAPHY

IMMIGRANTS

Immigrants in the United States - 2002: A Snapshot of America's Foreign-Born Population. By Steven A. Camarota. Center for Immigration Studies. (The Center, Washington, DC) November 2002. 24 p.

Full Text at: www.cis.org/articles/2002/back1302.pdf

["An economic slowdown and stringent antiterrorism measures have not slowed the flow of legal and illegal immigrants into California a new study concludes. More than 3.3 million legal and illegal immigrants entered the United States between January 2000 and March 2002.... [The study] concluded that immigrants, legal and illegal, and their newborn children account for essentially all of the 872,000 person increase in California's population since the 2000 Census. Frequently, these new residents are much more likely to be poor and need social services." Fresno Bee (November 27, 2002) B3.]

[Request #S6987]

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YOUTH

Religion And The Life Attitudes And Self-Images Of American Adolescents. By Christian Smith and Robert Faris, University of North Carolina. National Study of Youth and Religion Research Report. No. 2. (The University, Chapel Hill, North Carolina) 2002. 42 p.

Full Text at: www.youthandreligion.org/publications/docs/Attitudes.pdf

["Religious Teens Are Happier Teens, Study Finds: Religious 12th graders have significantly higher self-esteem and hold more positive attitudes about life than their less religious peers, a new national study has concluded.... The analysis of survey data ... was collected from about 2,400 high school seniors." Sacramento Bee (December 13, 2002)

[Request #S6990]

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ECONOMY

BUSINESS CLIMATE

"Location Trends of Large Company Headquarters during the 1990s." By Thomas Klier and William Testa, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago. IN: Economic Perspectives, vol. 26, no. 2 (Second Quarter, 2002) pp. 12-26.

Full Text at: www.chicagofed.org/publications/economicperspectives/2002/2qepart2.pdf

["In this article, we provide information on recent locational trends for company headquarters, which will be helpful to policymakers as they design development efforts and expenditures.... We also document the extent and nature of headquarters turnover or 'churn' for three sample cities -- New York, Chicago, and San Francisco -- between 1990 and 2000."]

[Request #S6992]

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CORPORATIONS

The Power of the Purse: How Investors Can Restore Integrity to Our Financial Markets. By Phil Angelides, Office of the California Treasurer. (The Office, Sacramento, California) December 2, 2002. 14 p.

Full Text at: www.treasurer.ca.gov/publications/PowerofthePurse.pdf

["Investors and Funds Should Push Corporate Reform, Says Angelides: In his latest bid to heighten visibility on corporate reform, Phil Angelides called on investors to use their market strength to force change.... The paper calls on pension funds and others to, among other things, conduct business only with corporations that operate with openness and integrity." Sacramento Bee (December 10, 2002) A1.]

[Request #S6991]

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GAMBLING

"Response to 'Indian Casinos: Wheel of Misfortune.' By the National Indian Gaming Association. (The Association, Washington, DC) December 2002. 1 p.

Full Text at: www.indiangaming.org/info/pr/press_releases/time-magazine.shtml

["Indian gaming is self-reliance. Through Indian gaming, Tribes have created over 300,000 jobs nationwide. Jobs in Indian Country are precious - whether its 80 jobs on the Pine Ridge reservation, located in the poorest county in the United States, or 3,000 jobs at the Oneida Nation of New York, outside Syracuse. Many Indian casinos are the largest employers in their areas, yet your report completely discounts the value of jobs to our people who have historically suffered shocking unemployment rates, high levels of poverty and lack of economic opportunities on Indian homelands."]

[Request #S6988]

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"Secret of Indian Casinos: Everyone Wins." "For Time Magazine: Sovereignty 101." "Time (Magazine) Has Slanted View of Indian Country." And "Time (Magazine) Keeps Strafing Indian Country." IN: Indian Country Today (December 13-20, 2002) [online.]

Full Text at: IndianCountry.com/?1039788896

["The article (Time Magazine, December 16, 2002) makes much of the fact that non-Native backers of tribes often make a great deal of money while getting certain tribes going in gaming. So what? Is this not what investors do throughout all business? In all cases we know of, the tribes set goals to pay off the investors and obviously many do quite well after their start-up investors are paid off. The assumption is that the tribes are getting ripped off. TIME complains that despite casinos, there is still Indian poverty; it irks TIME that some tribes are better prepared or better situated than others. But these are accidents of geographic location and also depend on a particular tribe’s leadership and human resources. But it also misses the big picture. American Indian governments are sovereign entities."]

[Request #S6989]

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GAMBLING INDUSTRY

"California Casinos: [Series.]" By Bruce Spence. IN: The Record. (December 8-9, 2002) A1+.

[Includes: "Striking it Rich;" "Indian Gaming Faced California Legal Hurdles;" "Gaming Reaping Rewards for Tribes;" and "Tribe Takes Nevada Partner."]

[Request #S6993]

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"Playing the Political Slots: How Indian Casino Interests Have Learned the Art of Buying Influence in Washington." And "Who Gets The Money? Indian Casinos: Special Report." By Donald L. Barlett and James B. Steele. IN: Time Magazine, (December 16-23, 2002) pp. 48-62+.

["Only 25% of gaming tribes distribute cash to their members, usually no more than a few thousand dollars each.... In many cases, the big winners are non-Indian investors, some of whom pocket more than 40% of an Indian casino's profits.... They often serve as master strategists who draw up the plans and then underwrite the total cost of bringing a casino online; ferreting out an amenable tribe, paying a signing bonus, picking up tribal expenses and paying the salaries of the tribe's officials, all of this before a spade of dirt is turned."]

[Request #S6994]

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HOUSING

The Economic Benefits of Housing in California. By the Sacramento Regional Research Institute, a Joint Venture of the Sacramento Area Commerce and Trade Organization and California State University, Sacramento. (The Institute, Sacramento, California) December 2002. 36 p.

Full Text at: www.jobcenterhousing.com./pdf/fountain-study.pdf

["Given the multiplier effects of home construction, the housing industry is the largest industry group in the state, with economic contributions matched only by the wholesale and retail industry. Among the findings of the report: every dollar spent on new housing construction generates nearly $2 in total economic activity; new housing construction contributes approximately $40 billion per year to the California economy and creates an estimated 359,000 jobs statewide; and the housing sector as a whole contributes more than $257 billion per year to the California economy and generates 821,000 jobs when all facets of the industry are considered." Sacramento Business Journal (December 18, 2002) online.]

[Request #S6995]

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INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

"Internet Usage Grows: But So Does the Digital Divide." IN: Bay Area Poll (December 2002) p. 1+.

Full Text at: www.bayareacouncil.org/pubs/bap/2002BAP.pdf

["Bay Area Embraces Internet, Poll Finds; But Gap Widens in Computer Use Between Rich, Poor: Among the findings is that nearly 75 percent of all local residents use the Internet at least once a week, up 3 percent from last year. Nationally, the average is around 60 percent.... Computer adoption actually declined 3 percent for lower-income residents to 65 percent." San Francisco Chronicle (December 9, 2002) 1.]

[Request #S6996]

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INTERNET

Pavlovich v. Superior Court. California Supreme Court. S100809. November 25, 2002. Various pagings.

["Limiting the entertainment industry's ability to combat piracy, the California Supreme Court ruled that California companies cannot bring lawsuits here against many out-of-state defendants operating on the Internet.... Allonn Levy, whose San Jose law firm represented Pavlovich without charge, said the decision probably will have an effect nationally. 'It is going to shape the way the jurisdiction is decided in every single intellectual property case that deals with the Internet. This is such a cutting-edge issue that other jurisdictions are very likely to look to this decision and follow it.'" Los Angeles Times (November 26, 2002) C1.]

[Request #S6997]

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EDUCATION

ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT

Parents Left Behind: A Study of State, Federal, and School District Implementation of No Child Left Behind. By ACORN: Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now. (The Association, Washington, DC) [November 2002].

["This ACORN report will look at two of the ways parents are supposed to be able to participate fully in helping their children get a good education. The first section will examine the issue of supplemental services.... The second parental involvement point examined involved the knowledge qualifications of the teachers."]

Main Report. 8 p.:
http://www.acorn.org/acorn10/betterschools/BetterSchoolsReports/parents/main.pdf

Responsibliities of States. 1 p.:
http://www.acorn.org/acorn10/betterschools/BetterSchoolsReports/parents/charta.htm

Responsibilities of Schools. 2 p.:
http://www.acorn.org/acorn10/betterschools/BetterSchoolsReports/parents/chartb.htm

Sources of Data. 27 p.:
http://www.acorn.org/acorn10/betterschools/BetterSchoolsReports/parents/chartc.htm

Elements of an ACORN School. 1 p.:
http://www.acorn.org/acorn10/betterschools/BetterSchoolsReports/parents/acornschool.htm

[Request #S6998]

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DISCRIMINATION

Bullying in Schools: Harassment Puts Gay Youth At Risk. By the National Mental Health Association. (The Association, Alexandria, Virginia) December 12, 2002 3 p.

Full Text at: www.nmha.org/pbedu/backtoschool/bullyingGayYouth.pdf

["Teens Cite Anti-Gay Bias at School: Bullying, Slurs Are Rampant, Nationwide Survey Finds: More than three-quarters of students witnessed harassment of kids who are gay or are perceived to be gay in their schools or neighborhoods, while more than 90 percent said they hear gay epithets, many every day, according to the survey." Mercury News (December 13, 2002) 1.]

[Request #S6999]

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SCHOOL FACILITIES

UC Housing for the 21st Century. By the University of California Housing Task Force. Prepared for the University of California Board of Regents. (The Board, Oakland, California) November 2002. 4 p.

Full Text at: www.ucop.edu/regents/regmeet/nov02/8gfattach.pdf

["The Task Force identified a complex and strong set of programs that support ongoing housing programs for students, faculty, and staff.... [Task Force] recommendations are critical to assure the continued strength and viability of these programs and to achieve the goals identified in this plan."]

[Request #S7036]

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STUDENT AID

"Prepaid College Tuitions Worry States." By Liz Sidoti. IN: The Press-Enterprise (November 30) p. D3.

["Rates Are Being Raised to Keep the Programs Solvent. Huge Deficits Are Feared: Most of the 20 states that offer prepaid college tuition plans are raising rates to stay afloat amid concerns the economic downturn and rising school fees could cause multimillion-dollar deficits."]

[Request #S7000]

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TEACHERS

Rankings and Estimates: A Report of School Statistics. By National Education Association. (The Association, Washington, DC) Fall 2002. 8 p.

Full Text at: www.nea.org/edstats/images/reupdate02.pdf

[“Public school teachers in California earned the most last year and those in South Dakota the least, the nation’s largest teachers union reported…. Overall, increases in education revenues and teacher salaries lagged behind rates set last year, while school enrollments increased…. The report said that the average salary of a public school teacher for the 2001-2002 school year was $44,499, with 36 states paying salaries below that level. California teacher salaries averaged $53,870, followed by Connecticut and New York.” Associated Press (November 21, 2002) 1.]

[Request #S7001]

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EMPLOYMENT

POVERTY

A Tale of Two Cities: Bridging the Gap Between Promise and Peril. By United Way of Greater Los Angeles. (The United Way, Los Angeles, California) 2002. 28 p.

Full Text at: www.unitedwayla.org/pfdfiles/totc_rpt_02.pdf

[“The median income of Los Angeles County households diminished by a startling 10% in inflated-adjusted dollars between 1990 and 2000 according to a new report…. Citing a variety of government and private sources … the new report says that 18% of all the county’s residents, or about 1.7 million, are living below the poverty level. “ Los Angeles Times (November 15, 2002) A3]

[Request #S7002]

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UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE

Unemployment Insurance -- Expanded Eligibility: 2002. By the Center for Policy Alternatives (The Center, Washington, DC) 2002. 4 p.

Full Text at: www.cfpa.org/issues/workcompensation/unemployins/ui-eligibility.doc

["The single most important reform that would bring more low-wage workers into the UI system is the Alternative Base Period (ABP). Some workers fail to qualify for UI because they do not have enough qualifying weeks or wages using the traditional base period. Calculating eligibility with ABP allows the inclusion of more recent wages from the lag and/or filing quarters in order to meet the state's monetary eligibility requirements. Twelve states have adopted ABPs to promote UI eligibility expansion."]

[Request #S7003]

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ENERGY

Lessons Learned and Forgotten. By Richard L. Gordon, Pennsylvania State University. IN: Regulation: The Cato Review of Business and Government. vol. 25, no. 2. (Summer 2002) pp. 46-50.

Full Text at: www.cato.org/pubs/regulation/regv25n2/v25n2-8.pdf

["The largest and worst government interventions were eliminated in the 1980s, though many misguided programs of micromanagement remain. Unfortunately, the state of energy markets will deteriorate in the coming years following congressional passage of the revised version of President George W. Bush's energy plan."]

[Request #S7004]

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UTILITIES

Allocating Transmission To Mitigate Market Power in Electricity Markets. By Richard Gilbert, University of California Energy Institute, and others. Policy & Economics Working Paper EPE-001. (The Institute, Berkeley, California) September 25, 2002.

Full Text at: repositories.cdlib.org/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1000&context=ucei

["Allowing generators with market power access to transmission auctions when transmission capacity is constrained may amplify or mitigate their market power. Regulators may therefore wish to consider under what circumstances it would be desirable to prevent such generators from securing or retaining transmission contracts."]

[Request #S7005]

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ENVIRONMENT & NATURAL RESOURCES

FLOODPLAINS

California Floodplain Management Report: Draft. By the California Floodplain Management Task Force. (The Task Force, Sacramento, California) November 27, 2002. 79 p.

Full Text at: fpmtaskforce.water.ca.gov/forms/FPM%20TF%20Draft%20Report-12-01-02.doc

["Our recommendations are organized into three categories: Better Understanding and Reducing Risks from Reasonable Foreseeable Flooding, Multi-Objective Management Approach for Floodplains, and Local Assistance, Funding and Legislation. The Task Force also recognized that Floodplain management measures interrelate and frequently overlap with floodwater management measures to reduce losses within the floodplain."]

[Request #S7006]

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GLOBAL WARMING

"Recent Earth Oblateness Variations: Unraveling Climate and Postglacial Rebound Effects." By Jean O. Dickery and others. IN: Science, vol. 298, no. 5600 (December 6, 2002) pp. 1975-1977.

["The melting of Earth's glaciers is making the planet fatter, and scientist say if the trend continues, it could increase flooding, beach erosion and water shortages worldwide." San Francisco Chronicle (December 9, 2002) A8,]

[Request #S7007]

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GENERAL GOVERNMENT

CAMPAIGN CONTRIBUTIONS

"Building Influence." By Dorothy Korber: Series IN: Sacramento Bee. (December 8-10, 2002) A1+.

["Includes: Growth lobby a growing business, records show.... The growth lobby is biggest political donor in the fast-expanding county.... Contribution caps can blunt special interest' influence, backers say."]

[Request #S7008]

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COURT REFORM

"Edifice Wrecks." By Ronald M. George and Robert M. Hertzberg. IN: California Lawyer, vol. 22, no. 11 (November 2002) pp. 31-33.

["Recent transformations in the basic structure of the judicial system, accompanied by a new emphasis on collaboration, have reshaped California courts and expanded their ability to meet the public's needs. Nevertheless, although a great deal has been done to change and improve the way in which courts operate, the facilities in which they perform their role frequently lag far behind."]

[Request #S7009]

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FEDERAL GRANTS

Competitive Grant Update. By Federal Funds Information for States. FFIS Competitive Grant, 02-11. (FFIS, Washington, DC) November 25, 2002. 6 p.

[Includes: "Federal-State Marketing Improvement Program;" "Vocational Rehabilitation Service Projects;" "Basic Nurse Education and Practice Grants;" "Youth Offender Reentry Program;" "Substance Abuse Prevention: Replication and Evaluation Initiative;" "Water Quality Cooperative Agreements;" and others.]

[Request #S7010]

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STATE TAXES

"When We Withhold -- New California Rules to Accelerate Collections." By Kathleen K. Wright. IN: State Tax Notes, (Septemaber 23, 2002) pp. 957-960.

["This article looks at two of the [withholding] timing changes -- one dealing with the now-required withholding on sales of real estate by California residents and the second dealing with the increase in the withholding rate on supplemental income -- specifically bonuses and stock options. These two changes alone are scored to increase revenues available to the state by $625 million in fiscal 2003."]

[Request #S7011]

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"A Report on Research into Proposed Solutions to Sales and Use Tax Conundrums." By Benjamin Russo. IN: State Tax Notes, (November 4, 2002) pp 331-336.

["Sales and use tax are declining as shares of states' gross products.... Unless state tax systems are modernized to account for these trends, sales and use taxes may not continue as viable sources of revenue.... This report describes the results of new and ongoing research on state and local general sales and use taxes."]

[Request #S7012]

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"Streamlining the Sales Tax: Implications for Economic Growth." By George R. Zodrow. IN: State Tax Notes, (October 28, 2002) pp. 251-262.

["Reform of the state sales tax system has been a highly debated topic in recent years, with much of this interest prompted by the advent of electronic commerce.... This report reviews the history and current status of the debate, and evaluates various proposals for reform. It then discusses the implications of state sales tax reform for economic growth, considering both a coordinated national reform effort and changes that might be enacted at the level of a single state."]

[Request #S7013]

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TAXATION

Tax Policy in the New Economy: Interim Report. By the California Commission on Tax Policy in the New Economy. (The Commission, Sacramento, California) November 25, 2002. 22 p.

Full Text at: commerce.ca.gov/ttca/msdocs/detail/dsti/TaxComm_InterimReport_11-25-02.doc

["The purpose of this report is to describe to the Governor and the Legislature the range of issues that have arisen in the Commission's year of hearings.... This Interim Report reflects the broad range of perspectives of the Commissioners on the testimony and on the task we face in the coming year ... on tax policy considerations that arise in an era dominated by great technological change."]

[Request #S7014]

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VOTERS & VOTING

Help America Vote Act of 2002: Public Law 107-252. (Government Printing Office, Washington, DC) October 29, 2002.

Full Text at: www.usdoj.gov/crt/voting/HAVA_2002.html

["The purpose of this Act is to establish a program to provide funds to States to replace punch card voting systems, to establish the Election Assistance Commission to assist in the administration of Federal elections and ... to establish minimum election administration standards for States and units of local government with responsibility for the administration of Federal elections."]

[Request #S7015]

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Voting Over the Internet Pilot Project Assessment Report. By the Federal Voting Assistance Program, The Department of Defense. (The Program, Washington, DC) June 2001. 93 p.

Full Text at: www.calvoter.org/votingtech/VOIReport7-9.pdf

["A category of citizens who have experienced difficulties in participating in elections are those persons covered under the Uniformed and Overseas Citizens Absentee Voting Act.... To identify ways to maximize access to the polls for these citizens, the program conducted a small scale pilot project to examine the feasibility of using the Internet for remote registration and voting. This report presents the assessment results of the Voting Over the Internet (VOI) Pilot Project."]

[Request #S7016]

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HEALTH

ACCESS TO CARE

See No Evil: How Internet Filters Affect the Search for Online Health Information. By the Kaiser Family Foundation. (The Foundation, Menlo Park, California) December 2002. Various pagings.

Full Text at: www.kff.org/content/2002/20021210a/

["With a case pending before the U.S. Supreme Court challenging mandatory filters in libraries, the Foundation conducted a comprehensive study that indicates Internet filters most frequently used by schools and libraries can effectively block pornography without significantly impeding access to online health information -- but only if they aren’t set at their most restrictive levels. As filters are set at higher levels they block access to a substantial amount of health information, with only a minimal increase in blocked pornographic content." The Public Library Association's PLA Electronic Newsletter (December 19, 2002).]

[Request #S7017]

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CANCER

New Physician Survey Reveals Treatment Gap in Cancer Care for People Older Than 65. By The American Cancer Society Media Center. (The Center, Washington, DC) November 22, 2002. 6 p.

Full Text at: www.asaging.org/media/pressrelease.cfm?id=25

["Age Affects Cancer Care, Doctors Say: Survey of Physicians shows that cancer in patients over 65 may be undertreated. The survey found that almost two in three believe that people 65 and older suffer from undertreatment of their cancer.... Most clinical trials to test patients' reactions to treatment don't include elderly people." Sacramento Bee (December 9, 2002) A3.]

[Request #S7018]

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EMERGENCY CARE

Emergency Departments in the Health Care System: Use of Services in California and the United States. By the California HealthCare Foundation. (The Foundation, Oakland, California) 2002. 6 p.

Full Text at: www.chcf.org/documents/providersystems/EmergDeptUsageCaAndUS.pdf

["California's hospital-based emergency departments experienced lower per capita usage than EDs nationally, but California EDs are slightly busier than their counterparts nationally -- and their patients appear to be sicker. ED use nationwide was higher among the elderly and lower for children, countering conventional wisdom that EDs are used for primary pediatric care."]

[Request #S7019]

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California's Emergency Departments System Capacity and Demand: Issue Brief. By the California Healthcare Foundation. (The Foundation, Oakland, California) 2002. 7 p.

Full Text at: www.chcf.org/documents/providersystems/EmergDeptSystemCapacityAndDemand.pdf

["Although the number of hospitals with emergency departments has declined over the past decade, California’s hospitals have added considerable bed capacity to the state’s ED system. In fact, growth in ED bed capacity has outstripped California’s population growth, leading to an increase in the number of ED beds per capita. In addition, California’s trauma center system has remained remarkably stable during the study period, and has even expanded slightly."]

[Request #S7020]

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California's Trauma Care: System Capacity and Demand: Issue Brief. By the California HealthCare Foundation. (The Foundation, Oakland, California) 2002. 4 p.

Full Text at: www.chcf.org/documents/providersystems/TramaCareSystemCapacityAndDemand.pdf

["California trauma centers are not experiencing the increases in acuity or volume experienced by non-trauma center hospital emergency departments. The level of acuity did not change between 1990 and 1999. In contrast, critical visits to non-trauma EDs increased by 75 percent in that same time period."]

[Request #S7021]

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OBESITY

An Epidemic: Overweight And Unfit Children in California Assembly District. By Samuels and Associates. Prepared for the California Center For Public Health Advocacy. Legislative District Policy Brief. No. 1. (The Center, Davis, California) December 2002.

Full Text at: www.publichealthadvocacy.org/policy_briefs/study_documents/Full_Report1.pdf

["Politicians Prodded on Child Obesity: The report breaks down by Assembly District the dismal results of the state's public school fitness test.... 77 percent of California's 1.2 million fifth-, seventh-, and ninth-graders flunked six aerobic, strength and body fat tests." San Francisco Chronicle (December 12, 2002) 1.] Summary Brief. 3 p.
http://www.publichealthadvocacy.org/policy_briefs/study_documents/Policy_Brief1.pdf
Full Report. 85 p.
http://www.publichealthadvocacy.org/policy_briefs/study_documents/Full_Report1.pdf

[Request #S7022]

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HOUSING

AFFORDABLE HOUSING

America's Working Families and the Housing Landscape 1997-2001. By Barbara J. Lipman. Center for Housing Policy/ National Housing Conference. (The Center, Washington, DC) November 2002. 40 p.

Full Text at: www.nhc.org/nhcimages/HAWF4.pdf

[“The number of low-to moderate-income working families spending more than half their earnings on housing rose by over 67 percent between 1997 and 2001, with conditions worst in the West, according to a report…. The percentage of working families spending more than half their income on housing increased to 15.8 percent in 2001, up from 13.4 percent in 1999.” Oakland Tribune (November 20, 2002) A1.]

[Request #S7023]

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DISCRIMINATION

Smart Growth and Its Effects on Housing Markets: The New Segregation. By QuantEcon for the Center for Environmental Justice. The National Center for Public Policy Research. (The Center, Washington, DC) November 2002. 41 p.

Full Text at: www.nationalcenter.org/NewSegregation.pdf

["Restricted growth policies are designed to preserve open space and reduce motor vehicle usage through limitations on the geographic expansion of metropolitan areas. Such policies necessarily -- as one of their goals -- reduce the land available for home building. Concerned that simple supply and demand market principles dictate that a reduction in the availability of housing will push up housing prices, and aware the minorities in the U.S., on the average, have lower incomes than other American ... [the study] set out to determine if restricted growth policies are reducing homeownership opportunities for minority Americans."]

[Request #S7024]

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UNITED STATES

Taking Stock: Rural People, Poverty, and Housing at the Turn of the 21st Century. By the Housing Assistance Council. (The Council, Washington, DC) December 2002. Various pagings.

Full Text at: www.ruralhome.org/pubs/hsganalysis/ts2000/index.htm

["This report analyzes data from the 2000 Census and other sources, examining trends nationally and in five high need areas and populations: the border colonias, Central Appalachia, farmworkers, the Lower Mississippi Delta, and Native American lands. The report found that one in four rural families pays too much for housing and includes housing and poverty maps." HAC News, Information on Rural Low-Income Housing (December 13, 2002) online.]

[Request #S7025]

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HUMAN SERVICES

CHILD SUPPORT

Child Support Enforcement Program: The Procurement of a Single, Statewide Automated Child Support System Is Taking Longer Than Initially Estimated, With Several Challenges Remaining. By the California State Auditor, Bureau of State Audits. 99028.1. (The Bureau, Sacramento, California) December 2002. 26 p.

Full Text at: www.bsa.ca.gov/bsa/pdfs/990281.pdf

["State Fined For Missing Deadlines: Since 1998, the federal government has fined the state mightily for its failure to implement a statewide automated collection system.... State child support officials are in exclusive negotiations with a consortium led by IBM for automated collection technology they aim to get in place by fiscal year 2007-08." Contra Costa Times (December 18, 2002) A1.]

[Request #S7026]

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CHILDREN

Children in Poverty: Trends, Consequences and Policy Options. By Kristin Anderson Moore and Zakia Redd, Child Trends. (Child Trends, Washington, DC) November 2002. 8 p.

Full Text at: www.childtrends.org/PDF/PovertyRB.pdf

["The proportion of children living in poverty in 2001 was at the lowest point since the 1970s -- but it is still high and no longer declining, according to this Child Trends analysis. In 2001, seven percent of all children lived in extreme poverty.... Among all racial and ethnic groups, children in households headed by a single mother were nearly five times as likely to be impoverished as kids in households headed by married parents. The report recommends maintaining financial work supports, reducing the marriage penalty within the Earned Income Tax Credit, and supporting efforts to strengthen marriages and decrease births to teens and unmarried women." Connect for Kids (December 2, 2002)]

[Request #S7027]

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FATHERHOOD

Expanding the Goals of "Responsible Fatherhood" Policy: Voices From the Field in Four Cities. By Juliane Baron and Kathleen Sylvester, Social Policy Action Network. (The Network, Washington, DC) December 2002. 39 p.

Full Text at: www.span-online.org/gender.pdf

["[This study] examines the problems of low-income, noncustodial fathers at the local level. Social Policy Action Network (SPAN) and the National Practitioners' Network for Fathers and Families (NPNFF) interviewed fathers and the front-line workers who try to help them to find out why these fathers don't get the help they need." Moving Ideas (December 12, 2002)]

[Request #S7028]

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Father Absence and Child Well-Being: A Critical Review. By Wendy Sigle-Rushton and Sara McLanahan, Center For Research on Child Well-Being, Princeton University. Working Paper #02-20. (The Center, Princeton, New Jersey) November 2002. 55 p.

Full Text at: crcw.princeton.edu/workingpapers/WP02-20-Sigle.pdf

[[According to this study] social scientific research has not and probably cannot tell us exactly how well children would fare if their parents had married or stayed together. However, it can provide a good deal of information on the ways in which policies can be designed to address some of the problems and disadvantages that go along with father absence or parental divorce."]

[Request #S7034]

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TRANSPORTATION

AIRLINE SAFETY

Safer Skies: Baggage Screening and Beyond: White Paper With Supporting Analysis. By Gary Kauvar and others, RAND National Security Research Division. WP-131-RC/NSRD. WP-131/1-RC/NSRD. (RAND, Santa Monica, California) 2002. 71 p.

Full Text at: www.rand.org/publications/WP/WP131/WP131.pdf

["We propose an approach that is based on developing security solutions that are appropriate to individual locations while ensuring that national interests are safeguarded.... The common goal should be a fully functioning air transportation system that provides passengers with safe, efficient, and convenient means of carrying out the nation's business."]

[Request #S7029]

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TRAFFIC CONGESTION

Still Stuck in the Slow Lane. By Bay Area Poll, Bay Area Council. (The Council, San Francisco, California) December 2002. 4 p.

Full Text at: www.bayareacouncil.org/pubs/bap/2002BAP.pdf

["Traffic and the souring economy are at the top of the list of irritants chipping steadily away at the Bay Area's once rosy view of the world. The regionwide poll commission ... shows that while people in the nine Bay Area counties are still cautiously optimistic, they are seriously concerned about continuing traffic problems and the wine-turned vinegar economy." San Francisco Chronicle (December 5, 2002) 1.]

[Request #S7030]

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STUDIES TO COME
[The following studies, reports, and documents have been ordered or requested, but have not yet arrived. Requests may be placed, and copies will be provided when the material arrives.]

CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT

CHILD PROTECTION

Promoting Community Child Protection: A Legislative Agenda. By Leigh Goodmark, Center on Children and the Law, American Bar Association. (The Association, New York, New York) August 2002.

["This resource details the changes in state and federal laws that can help communities take a greater responsibility for protecting children and strengthening families." Connect for Kids Weekly (November 4, 2002). NOTE: Promoting Community Child Protection ... will be available for 3-day loan.]

[Request #S7031]

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HATE CRIMES

Breaking the Cycles of Hatred: Memory, Law and Repair. By Martha Minow. Princeton University Press, (Princeton, New Jersey) 2003. 264 p.

["(Martha Minow) argues that innovative legal institutions and practices, such as truth commissions and civil damage actions against groups that sponsor hate, often work better than more conventional criminal proceedings and sanctions. Minow also calls for more sustained attention to the underlying dynamics of violence, the connections between intergroup and intrafamily violence, and the wide range of possible responses to violence beyond criminalization. NOTE: Breaking the Cycle ... will be available for 3-day loan."]

[Request #S7032]

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EMPLOYMENT

LABOR STATISTICS

Unscheduled Absence Survey. By Commerce Clearinghouse Inc. (Commerce Clearinghouse, Riverwoods, Illinois) 2002.

["Survey Shows Change in the Use of Sick Days; For Family, Personal Issues, More than Illness; Absenteeism Hurts Companies: Human resources analysts said that employers can improve morale -- and unwanted absences -- by having sensible policies addressing workers' personal needs." Washington Times (October 17, 2002) C7. NOTE: Unscheduled Absence Survey ... will be available for 3-day loan.]

[Request #S7033]

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GENERAL GOVERNMENT

PRIVACY

21st edition. By Harry A. Hammitt and others, Electronic Privacy Information Center. (The Center, Washington, DC) 2002. 570 p.; Appendices.

["[The publication] presents a comprehensive, authoritative discussion of the federal open access laws, including: The Freedom of Information Act; The Privacy Act; The Federal Advisory Commitee Act [and] The Government in the Sunshine Act.... Appendices include the texts of the relevant acts, and sample pleadings for litigators." Publishers Announcement." NOTE: 21st Edition ... will be available for 3-day loan.]

[Request #S7037]

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HEALTH

INNOVATIVE THERAPIES

"Payment Under Public and Private Insurance and Access to Cochlear Implants." By Steven Garber and others. IN: Archives of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, vol. 128 (October 2002) pp. 1145-1152.

["A cochlear implant is an electronic device that restores partial hearing to the deaf. It is surgically implanted in the inner ear and activated by a device worn outside the ear. Unlike a hearing aid, it does not make sound louder or clearer. Instead, the device directly stimulates the nerve that receives sound. More expensive than a hearing aid, the total cost of a cochlear implant, including evaluation, surgery, the device and rehabilitation, is about $30,000. Most insurance companies cover them." The Indianapolis Star (December 15, 2002) B1.]

[Request #S7038]

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