Subject: Studies in the News 03-36 (June 5, 2003)


CALIFORNIA RESEARCH BUREAU
CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY
Studies in the News
Children and Family Supplement


Contents This Week

Introductory Material ECONOMY
   Parents fear effects of media
EDUCATION
   School discipline and disabled students
   Overview of Head Start's stakeholders
   Head Start health standards
   Perspectives on Head Start
   Head Start and disabled children
HEALTH
   Child health research
HUMAN SERVICES
   Work incentives and families
   Families and the child tax credit
   Children and the success of TANF
STUDIES TO COME
   Developing early literacy skills
   Dental delivery programs for migrant children
Introduction to Studies in the News

Studies in the News: Children and Family Supplement is a service provided to the California Children and Families Commission (CCFC) by the State Library's Research Bureau and State Information and Reference Center. The service features weekly lists of current articles focusing on Children and Family policy. Prior lists can be viewed from the California State Library's Web Catalog by selecting the Special Resources link on the opening page at www.lib.state.ca.us.

Introduction to Studies in the News

Studies in the News is a very current compilation of items significant to the Legislature and Governor's Office. It is created weekly by the State Library's Research Bureau to supplement the public policy debate in California’s Capitol. To help share the latest information with state policymakers, these reading lists are now being made accessible through the State Library’s website. This week's list of current articles in various public policy areas is presented below.

Service to State Employees:

  • When available, the URL for the full text of each item is provided.

  • Items in the State Library collection can be checked out to state officials and staff.

  • Access to all materials listed will be provided by the State Information Reference Center, either by e-mail to cslsirc@library.ca.gov or by calling 654-0261.

The following studies are currently on hand:

ECONOMY

MEDIA

The 2003 Common Sense Media Poll of American Parents. By Penn Schoen & Berland Associates and American Viewpoint. Prepared for Common Sense Media. (The Media, San Francisco, California) May 21, 2003. 19 slides.

Full Text at: www.commonsensemedia.org/about/press/ParentspollMay212003.ppt

["Parents Fear Perils of Media, Poll Shows. New San Francisco group puts ratings guide online. An overwhelming majority of parents believe that unsuitable TV, movies, video games and contemporary music lead to violent, anti-social behavior and sex at younger ages, according to a national survey." San Francisco Chronicle (May 22, 2003) A1.]

[Request #S8368]

Return to the Table of Contents

EDUCATION

DISABILITIES

Suspending Disbelief: Moving Beyond Punishment to Promote Effective Interventions for Children with Mental or Emotional Disorders. By Tammy Seltzer, Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law. (The Center, Washington, DC) May 2003. 30 p.

Full Text at: www.bazelon.org/issues/children/publications/suspending/suspendingdisbelief.pdf

["One of the contentious issues in the IDEA reauthorization is whether school discipline policies and practices should take disability into account. According to this report, schools can successfully address the reasons behind problem behavior of students with disabilities, as required by the current federal special education law, in ways that lead to 'fewer behavior problems and an atmosphere of learning instead of constant power struggles.'" Connect for Kids (May 27, 2003).]

[Request #S8369]

Return to the Table of Contents

HEAD START

What's New in 2002? A Snapshot of Head Start Children, Families, Teachers and Programs. By Rachel Schumacher and Kate Irish, Center for Law and Social Policy. (The Center, Washington, DC) May 2003. 8 p.

Full Text at: www.clasp.org/DMS/Documents/1053092277.32/HS_brief2.pdf

[“This year Congress is scheduled to reauthorize Head Start…. New federal data on Head Start children, families, teachers and programs provide insight into what services the program provided and whom it served in 2002…. Findings from this brief include: 1)the vast majority of Head Start children were in families with earnings at or below poverty level or who received public assistance at enrollment…; 2)most Head Start families do not include a parent with more than a high school education, and only a small proportion of families had one or both parents enrolled in an education or training program.”]

[Request #S8370]

Return to the Table of Contents

Promoting the Health of Poor Preschool Children: What Do Federal Head Start Performance Standards Require? By Rachel Schumacher, Center for Law and Social Policy. (The Center, Washington, DC) May 15, 2003. 3 p.

Full Text at: www.clasp.org/DMS/Documents/1053012415.12/HS_health.pdf

["Head Start programs provide early childhood education, comprehensive services, and family support to more than 900,000 low-income children and their families. This paper describes the specific Head Start requirements for the provision of health screenings, follow-up, and linkages to services to participating children and their families and provides data on health services provided to Head Start children and families in 2002."]

[Request #S8371]

Return to the Table of Contents

Head Start's Future: Perspectives from the Bush Administration, Congress, States, Advocates, and Researchers. Brookings Welfare Reform & Beyond Initiative Public Forum. (Brookings Institution, Washington, DC) Forum held May 7, 2003.

["This forum on Head Start, featuring policymakers, researchers, and advocates whose comments provide insight into how Head Start reauthorization is being framed by national policymakers. Specifically, they spoke of providing control of Head Start to the states as an extension of the No Child Left Behind Act (the Elementary and Secondary Education Act): providing governors control over this early childhood program as a way to assist states in meeting the K-12 mandates of NCLB." Ece-List (May 22, 2003).]

Introduction and Panel 1. 26 p.:
http://www.brookings.edu/comm/events/20030507wrb.pdf

Panel 2. 19 p.:
http://www.brookings.edu/dybdocroot/comm/events/20030507wrb_panel2.pdf

Panel 3. 15 p.:
http://www.brookings.edu/dybdocroot/comm/events/20030507wrb_panel3.pdf

[Request #S8372]

Return to the Table of Contents

Preparing For Success: How Head Start Helps Children With Disabilities and Their Families. By Jennifer Mezey, Center for Law and Social Policy, and Katherine Beh Neas, Easter Seals. (The Center, Washington, DC) May 14, 2003. 6 p.

Full Text at: www.clasp.org/DMS/Documents/1052934362.69/HS_disabilities.pdf

["In 2002, 13 percent of the children in Head Start and Early Head Start (over 125,000 children) were diagnosed with a disability. The great majority of these children received special education and related services to address their disabilities. Without Head Start, some of these children might have gone undiagnosed, leaving their disabilities unaddressed for years, and producing hardship for them and their families and higher special education costs for school districts."]

[Request #S8373]

Return to the Table of Contents

HEALTH

CHILDREN

Building Bridges For Child Health Research, Policy and Practice: New Concepts and Paradigms. By G.B. Silver and others, Johns Hopkins Women's and Children's Health Policy Center. (The Center, Baltimore, Maryland) 2002. 6 p.

Full Text at: www.jhsph.edu/wchpc/pub/bbbrief.pdf

["This brief examines the challenges of conducting policy and practice-relevant child health research. Obstacles that may preclude practitioners and policymakers from integrating research into relevant programs and policies also are examined." CDF Child Health Information Project (May 30, 2003).]

[Request #S8374]

Return to the Table of Contents

HUMAN SERVICES

FAMILIES

Making Work Pay: How to Design and Implement Financial Work Supports to Improve Family and Child Well-Being and Reduce Poverty. By Debbie Greenberger and Robert Anselmi, Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation. (The Corporation, New York, New York) April 2003. 77 p.

Full Text at: www.mdrc.org/Reports2003/makeworkpay_howto/mwp_howto.pdf

["This report identifies program features and administrative practices that can help states better target financial work incentives to intended beneficiaries, increase participation among eligible incentive recipients, and maximize the benefits of the incentives. The lessons it contains should prove especially timely as state and local governments, straining under severe budgetary pressures, strive to sustain earnings supplement programs and make their delivery more efficient."]

[Request #S8375]

Return to the Table of Contents

LOW INCOME

How the New Tax Law Alters the Child Tax Credit and How Low-Income Families Are Affected. By Andrew Lee and Robert Greenstein, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. (The Center, Washington, DC) May 29, 2003. 4 p.

Full Text at: www.cbpp.org/5-28-03tax3.pdf

["According to this brief, the final legislation accelerates the child tax credit provision of the 2001 tax cut that is targeted on middle- and upper-income families but not the comparable provision of the 2001 law that is targeted on low- and moderate income families. (Similarly, the final legislation accelerates the marriage penalty relief provisions in the 2001 law for middle- and upper-income families but not the marriage penalty relief provision of that law targeted on low-income working families.) As a result, while some low-income families will benefit from the Child Tax Credit provisions of the new tax law, those provisions — like the new law as a whole — largely ignore low-income working families."]

[Request #S8376]

Return to the Table of Contents

TEMPORARY ASSISTANCE FOR NEEDY FAMILIES

Measuring Success of TANF for Children: Congress Considers Two Options. By the Research Forum on Children, Families and the New Federalism, Columbia University. The Forum. Vol. 6, No. 3 (The Forum, New York, New York) June 2003. 4 p.

Full Text at: www.researchforum.org/newsletter/forum63.pdf

["Lawmakers say that a major goal of the TANF reauthorization is to promote the well-being of children. The Research Forum explains the two possible strategies to measure child well-being that are being considered." Connect for Kids (May 27, 2003).]

[Request #S8377]

Return to the Table of Contents


STUDIES TO COME
[The following studies, reports, and documents have been ordered or requested, but have not yet arrived. Requests may be placed, and copies will be provided when the material arrives.]

EDUCATION

READING

Love to Read: Essays in Developing and Enhancing Early Literacy Skills of African-American Children. Edited by Barbara Bowman. (National Black Child Development Institute, Washington, DC) 2002.

["Closing the reading achievement gap for African-American children is both vital and feasible, the contributors to this volume attest. Leading experts document African- American children’s current reading achievement, focus on how teachers and parents can promote significant progress, and discuss policy considerations in boosting all children’s mastery of literacy. By nurturing young children’s love of reading and fostering the skills that underlie literacy, parents and teachers can have a significant positive impact on children’s future success and well-being." NAEYC Online.]

[Request #S8378]

Return to the Table of Contents

HEALTH

DENTAL CARE

"Cost-Efficiency of a Community Dental Delivery Program for Migrant Children." By Chaffin JG, Satishchandra P, and Bagramian RA. IN: Journal of Dentistry for Children, vol. 70, no. 1 (January-April 2003) pp. 47-50.

["The purpose of this study was to describe an economically efficient dental prevention and treatment program aimed at migrant children, using dental school students. The dental program provided comprehensive treatment (including preventive and restorative treatment) to 330 children for a total of 6 weeks.... The authors conclude that 'this study illustrated an efficient and cost-effective method of providing oral health [care] to a traditionally underserved population.'" National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, MCH Alert (May 30, 2003).]

[Request #S8379]

Return to the Table of Contents