Subject: Studies in the News 03-63 (October 1, 2003)


CALIFORNIA RESEARCH BUREAU
CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY
Studies in the News


California -- One Hundred and Fifty Years Ago

1853 - "The California State Legislature meets for their third session in Benicia, following a session in San Jose and Vallejo. 215 bills are introduced in the Senate and 245 in the Assembly. 180 of these bills are approved by the governor, including legislation that established a ten-hour workday and allowed women to own property under their own name. Historical Highlights http://boxer.senate.gov/calLinks/benicia/timeline.html "    

1853 - "The fourth session of the California Legislature convened in the capitol building in 1853 and for one year, February 1853 to February 1854, the optimistic little boom town of Benicia filled to overflowing with the extraordinary vitality, intensity, and turbulence that characterized political life amid the explosive growth years of the California gold rush. Many discussions and debates took place in this building during 1853. Benicia Capitol State Historic Park http://www.rootsweb.com/~cagsv/BenCap/b_cityhall.html "    

Contents This Week

Introductory Material CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT
   Identification fraud
   Methamphetamine enforcement initiatives
   Prevalence of imprisonment in the U.S. population
   Prisoner reentry health challenges
CULTURE AND SOCIETY
   Bay Area Asian-Americans
   Collection and use of racial data
   Proposition 54 exemptions
   Racial data under Proposition 54
   Trends in immigrant naturalization
DEMOGRAPHY
   Guide to data on immigrants
ECONOMY
   State government and the California economy
   Court blocks do-not-call list
   Do-not-call list declared unconstitutional
   Country-of-origin food labeling
   Regulating death care industry
   Microchips used by retailers and manufacturers
   Public investment in science and technology research
EDUCATION
   Charter school start-up challenges
   Financing rural community colleges
   The cost of college
   Bureau of Indian Affairs school funding
   School vouchers and private schools
EMPLOYMENT
   Employer costs of mandatory health coverage
ENERGY
   Electricity transmission market
ENVIRONMENT & NATURAL RESOURCES
   Global climate change
   Governors join to reduce global warming
   Climate change and California water needs
   Environmentally-friendly practices
   Public opinion on biotech food
   EU ruling on biotech foods
   Security risks at national monuments
   Water quality violations ignored
GENERAL GOVERNMENT
   Suit filed against discrimination bill
   Campaign disclosure laws
   Cities not receiving security funding
   Federal government contracting out
   Politics and science in the federal administration
   Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act
   Roots of fiscal stress for states
HEALTH
   Needle exchange and AIDs risk
   Cancer statistics for Hispanics
   Problems at LA County health services
   Inpatient charity care
   Rationing health care
   Case on medical marijuana raids dismissed
   Medical marijuana laws
HOUSING
   Housing costs exceed low-wage incomes
   Unfunded housing vouchers
HUMAN SERVICES
   Audit of community care licensing
   Federal oversight of child welfare
   California's food stamp vehicle policy
   Child care funds fall below needs
   Outcomes for families leaving welfare
TRANSPORTATION
   Los Angeles rail transit stations
WASHINGTON READER
   California Institute's briefing on federal issues
STUDIES TO COME
   Harassment training and prevention
   Proposal to allow cites to unpublished opinions
   Underage drinking
   Obesity related to urban sprawl patterns
Introduction to Studies in the News

Studies in the News is a very current compilation of items significant to the Legislature and Governor's Office. It is created weekly by the State Library's Research Bureau to supplement the public policy debate in California’s Capitol. To help share the latest information with state policymakers, these reading lists are now being made accessible through the State Library’s website. This week's list of current articles in various public policy areas is presented below.

Service to State Employees:

  • When available, the URL for the full text of each item is provided.

  • Items in the State Library collection can be checked out to state officials and staff.

  • Access to all materials listed will be provided by the State Information Reference Center, either by e-mail to cslsirc@library.ca.gov or by calling 654-0261.

The following studies are currently on hand:

CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT

DRIVER LICENSES

Security: Counterfeit Identification and Identification Fraud Raise Security Concerns. By the U.S. General Accounting Office. GAO-03-1147T. (The Office, Washington, DC) September 9, 2003. 12 p.

Full Text at: www.gao.gov/cgi-bin/getrpt?GAO-03-1147T

["Wide-ranging weaknesses in government agencies' ability to prevent identity fraud are made worse by flawed databases used to check identification documents, according to federal investigators. In testimony for a hearing before the Senate Finance Committee, Robert J. Cramer, from the General Accounting Office, described how auditors successfully used a variety of false IDs to enter the country, purchase handguns, acquire drivers licenses and roam federal buildings."] Newsbytes (September 9, 2003) 1.]

[Request #S9134]

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DRUGS

An Evaluation of the COPS Office Methamphetamine Initiative. By Office of Community Oriented Policing Services, U.S. Department of Justice (The Department, Washington, DC) 2003. 293 p.

Full Text at: www.cops.usdoj.gov/Default.asp?Open=True&Item=848

["Methamphetamine production, sale, and use have increased dramatically in many U.S. communities over the past two decades.... This report presents an introduction to methamphetamine, its history, production methods, and its impact on people’s health and the environment.... Finally, conclusions are presented and recommendations offered."]

[Request #S9135]

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PRISONERS

Prevalence of Imprisonment in the U.S. Population, 1974 - 2001. By Thomas P. Boncar, Bureau of Justice Statistics, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice (The Office, Washington, DC) August 2003. 12 p.

Full Text at: www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/pub/pdf/piusp01.pdf

["About one in every 37 U.S. adults either was imprisoned at the end of 2001 or had been at one time, the government reported ... The 5.6 million people with 'prison experience' represented 2.7 percent of the adult population, the highest incarceration level in the world. The study is the first to measure not only how many adults are behind bars, but how many had ever been imprisoned at any time." The Chicago Sun-Times (August 18, 2003) 3.]

[Request #S9136]

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PRISONERS & PAROLEES

Prisoner Reentry: What Are the Public Health Challenges? By RAND. RAND Research Brief. (RAND, Santa Monica, California) 2003. 2 p.

[“In the past 20 years, the number of ex-offenders released from state and federal prisons had increased threefold. In addition, a number of states are considering the early release of state prisoners as a way to reduce state budgets, which would accelerate the rate inmates are returned to communities. These trends present some key public health challenges. [The data] suggests … that soon-to-be-released offenders may bring a host of medical problems upon reentry and that the public health burden may be significant.”]

[Request #S9137]

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CULTURE AND SOCIETY

ASIAN AMERICANS

Asian Outlook: Bay Area People in Need: Unemployed, Youth and the Elderly. By the Asian Pacific Fund. (The Fund, San Francisco, California) Fall 2003.

["Asian Outlook is the first report on Bay Area Asian Americans to be issued based on analysis of data recently released by the U.S. Census Bureau. It includes information about children and the elderly and takes a more careful look at individual ethnic groups in areas that are good indicators of success and of need."]

Press release. 2 p.
http://www.asianpacificfund.org/resources/outlook2003.shtml

Report. 5 p.
http://www.asianpacificfund.org/resources/docs/outlook.pdf

[Request #S9138]

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ETHNIC CATEGORIES

How Might the "Classification by Race, Ethnicity, Color or National Origin" Initiative Impact Data Collection in California? By Lorene Allio and Jean Ross, California Budget Project (The Project, Sacramento, California) September 2003. 36 p.

Full Text at: www.cbp.org/2003/prop54data.pdf

["This paper focuses on the possible direct effects ... Proposition 54 could have broad impact on state data collection, use, and availability. However, the definitions and exemptions provided ... create much ambiguity about which activities would be prohibited and which would be allowed."]

[Request #S9139]

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Assessing the Impact of Proposition 54 on Health Care Policy Research: Preliminary Findings. By Kamran Nayeri, California Policy Research Center's Program on Access to Care CPAC Briefing Paper. (The Center, Berkeley, California) September 2003. 5 p.

Full Text at: ucdata.berkeley.edu/projects/CPAC_54_Paper.pdf

["Our research suggests that the Proposition 54 exemptions relating to federal mandates and funding or to medical research subjects and patients would not apply to many of these datasets, unless those exemptions are interpreted very broadly by the courts. Moreover, even if all health related datasets were exempted, their value would be limited by the proposition because public sector researchers could not combine health-related data with information from non-health related population data in order to calculate group-specific rates of health problems."]

[Request #S9189]

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The Classification of Race, Ethnicity, Color, or National Origin (CRECNO)Initiative: A Guide to the Projected Impacts on Californians. By Richard Michaelson and others, Institute of Governmental Studies, University of California. (The Institute, Berkeley, California) August 21, 2003. 74 p.

Full Text at: repositories.cdlib.org/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1025&context=igs

["Classification by race, ethnicity, color, or national origin will still be allowed under the following circumstances: If the governor and a two-thirds majority of both houses of the legislature decide that classification in state operations other than public education, public contracting, and public employment serves a 'compelling state interest.' Classification by the Department of Fair Employment and Housing for 10 years after the effective date of CRECNO. Classification of medical research subjects and patients. The description of suspects in order to aid law enforcement officers in their regular duties. Classification that is mandated by federal law. Classification that is necessary in order to maintain or establish eligibility for a federal program in order to prevent a loss of federal funds..... This report focuses on the program and policy impacts of CRECNO in four main areas: (1) education, (2) public health, (3) law enforcement, and (4) housing and employment discrimination."]

[Request #S9190]

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IMMIGRANTS

Trends in Naturalization. By Michael E. Fix, and others, The Urban Institute. (The Institute, Washington, DC) September 17, 2003. 8 p.

Full Text at: www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/310847_trends_in_naturalization.pdf

[“Mexican immigrants are becoming U.S. citizens at nearly double their rate for 1995, but they still lag far behind the naturalization rates of other immigrant groups, according to a new study. Demographers at the Urban Institute report that 34 percent of Mexican natives eligible for naturalization in 2001 became citizens. That is up from 19 percent in 1995. During the same period, the naturalization rate for other Latin Americans jumped from 40 percent to 58 percent, while the rate for Asian immigrants climbed from 56 percent to 67 percent. The rate for emigrants from Europe and Canada dropped from 66 percent to 65 percent.” San Diego Union Tribune (September 18, 2003) 1.]

[Request #S9140]

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DEMOGRAPHY

The New Neighbors: A User's Guide to Data on Immigrants in U.S. Communities. By Randolph Capps and others, the Urban Institute. (The Institute, Washington, DC) 2003. 72 p.

Full Text at: www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/310844_the_new_neighbors.pdf

["Immigrant integration is now a key issue for communities across the nation. States and communities that had seen few immigrants as recently as 1990 are now welcoming new arrivals in unprecedented numbers. This guidebook is designed to help local policy makers, program implementers, and advocates use U.S. Census and other data sources to identify immigrant populations in their local communities—their characteristics, their contributions, and their needs."]

[Request #S9141]

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ECONOMY

CALIFORNIA

Role of State Government in California Economic Growth. By Stephen Levy, Center for Continuing Study of the California Economy. (The Center, Palo Alto, California) September 2, 2003. 11 p.

Full Text at: www.ccsce.com/pdf/bseries4_stategovernment.pdf

["Governors and legislators do not create recessions nor do they have the tools to end recessions.... Governors and legislators do have a role in creating the conditions for long term private sector job growth.... The first dilemma is that not all businesses are attracted by the same factors.... The second dilemma is that the three major roles for the state in supporting and attracting private investment sometimes point in different directions"]

[Request #S9142]

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CONSUMER PROTECTION

U.S. Security, et al. v. Federal Trade Commission. U.S. District Court, Western District of Oklahoma. CIV-03-122-W. September 23, 2003. 19 p.

Full Text at: www.okwd.uscourts.gov/files/03-cv-122order.pdf

["A federal judge has ruled that the Federal Trade Commission overstepped its authority in creating the national "do-not-call" list against telemarketers.... The immediate impact of Tuesday's ruling by U.S. District Judge Lee R. West was not clear. He did not issue an order directing an action by the FTC. The list was to go into effect Oct. 1." Associated Press (September 24, 2003) 1.]

[Request #S9143]

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Mainstream Marketing Services, Inc., et al. v. Federal Trade Commission. U.S. District Court, District of Colorado. 03-N-0184. September 25, 2003. 33 p.

Full Text at: www.co.uscourts.gov/opinions/ewn_030184.pdf

["Judge Edward W. Nottingham said the list was unconstitutional under the First Amendment because it does not apply equally to all kinds of speech, blocking commercial telemarketing calls but not calls from charities. 'The FTC has chosen to entangle itself too much in the consumer's decision by manipulating consumer choice and favoring speech by charitable over commercial (organizations),' Nottingham wrote." Associated Press (September 25, 2003) 1.]

[Request #S9144]

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FOOD INDUSTRY

Country-of-Origin Labeling: Opportunities for USDA and Industry to Implement Challenging Aspects of the New Law. By the U.S. General Accounting Office. GAO-03-780. (The Office, Washington, DC) August 2003. 66 p.

Full Text at: www.gao.gov/new.items/d03780.pdf

["We are making several recommendations to (1) help industries comply with the new county-of-origin labeling law, (2) bring the meat industry into compliance with existing Tariff Act requirements, (3) ensure an accurate estimate of the record-keeping burden under the final program rules, and (4) create a level playing field for the retail sale of certain covered foods."]

[Request #S9145]

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GOVERNMENT REGULATIONS

Death Care Industry: Regulation Varies Across States and by Industry Segment. By the U.S. General Accounting Office. GAO-03-757. (The Office, Washington, DC) August 2003. 68 p.

Full Text at: www.gao.gov/new.items/d03757.pdf

["A federal report ... shows that oversight of the nation's crematories, cemeteries and funeral homes varies widely, and most states have only one or two inspectors to do the job.... The study ... also found that while state and federal authorities regulate funeral homes, little is being done to oversee cemeteries, sales of funeral goods and other areas of the 'death care industry.'" Associated Press State & Local Wire (September 12, 2003) online.]

[Request #S9146]

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PRIVACY

Privacy and Authentication in Low-Cost RFID Tags. By Ari Juels, RSA Laboratories. (The Laboratories, Bedford, Massachusetts) 2003. 21 p.

Full Text at: tinyurl.com/lnm1

["One large manufacturer has recently placed an order for half a billion RFID tags for use in consumer products.... A radio-frequency identification (RFID) tag is a small and inexpensive microchip that emits an identifier in response to a query from a nearby reader.... Our aim in this paper is to show how privacy and authentication may be considerably improved in low-cost RFID tags with only minimal enhancement of tag capabilities."]

[Request #S9147]

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SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

Seeds of Prosperity: Public Investment in Science and Technology Research: A Study of the Economic Potential of Proposition 301 at Arizona State University and a New Model for Assessing its Long-Term Value. By Rob Melnick and others, Morrison Institute for Public Policy, Arizona State University (The University, Tempe, Arizona) 2003. 48 p.

Full Text at: www.asu.edu/copp/morrison/Prop301.pdf

["Seeds of Prosperity presents a new way of assessing the long-term economic impact of science and technology research as a supplement to the traditional annual measures the Arizona Board of Regents will track. This new paradigm keeps 'score' on science and technology research by means of: connections developed between university researchers and business ... attention generated by university research, both locally and nationally ... and talent that Arizona recruits, retains, and develops because of its research."]

[Request #S9148]

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EDUCATION

CHARTER SCHOOLS

Charter Schools: New Charter Schools Across the Country and in the District of Columbia Face Similar Start-Up Challenges. By the U.S. General Accounting Office. GAO-03-899. (The Office, Washington, DC) September 2003. 43 p.

Full Text at: www.gao.gov/cgi-bin/getrpt?GAO-03-899

["This report examines (1) the challenges faced by charter school start-ups across the nation and the resources available in various states to address these challenges and (2) how the District of Columbia compares in terms of charter school challenges and resources. To address these objectives, GAO analyzed federal, state, and D.C. charter school laws and interviewed Education and District officials, including representatives of the D.C. charter school authorizing boards, the D.C. public school system, and various city offices. GAO also conducted a discussion group consisting of District charter school experts and D.C. charter school founders."]

[Request #S9149]

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COMMUNITY COLLEGES

Preserving Access to Excellence: Financing for Rural Community Colleges. By Steven G. Katsinas and others, Rural Community College Institute. (The Institute, Chapel Hill, North Carolina) 2003. 20 p.

Full Text at: www.ecs.org/html/offsite.asp?document=http://www.mdcinc.org/rcci/preserving_access.pdf

["For many of the 1.8 million students attending the 731 rural community colleges in the United States, normal rules of market choice do not apply -- the community college is the only option for higher education. It is essential to preserve and strengthen the capacity of rural community colleges to serve their communities with access and excellence."]

[Request #S9150]

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HIGHER EDUCATION

The College Cost Crisis: A Congressional Analysis of College Costs and Implications for America's Higher Education System. By Representative John A. Boehner (R-OH), Chair, U.S. House Committee on Education and the Workforce and Representative Howard P. McKeon (R-CA), Chair, U.S. House Subcommittee on 21st Century Competitiveness (The Committee on Education and the Workforce, Washington, DC) 2003. 22 p.

Full Text at: edworkforce.house.gov/issues/108th/education/highereducation/CollegeCostCrisisReport.pdf

["The converging climate of record tuition increases, growing public anxiety and even outrage over college cost, and concern at the federal level ... makes this discussion both timely and extremely valuable. The findings contained in this report do not purport to provide solutions to the cost crisis, nor suggest easy answers to improve the affordability of postsecondary education in America. However, this report is an essential first step to understanding the college cost crisis, its origins and continued causes."]

[Request #S9151]

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SCHOOL FINANCE

Bureau of Indian Affairs Schools: Expenditures in Selected Schools Are Comparable to Similar Public Schools. By the U.S. General Accounting Office. GAO-03-955. (The Office, Washington, DC) September 2003. 63 p.

Full Text at: www.gao.gov/cgi-bin/getrpt?GAO-03-955

["For this report, GAO examined (1) the sources and amounts of federal funding provided for BIA schools and how they are determined, (2) how BIA school budgets and expenditures compared to national per-pupil expenditures and expenditures for similarly situated public schools, and (3) how equitably various formulas distribute funding across BIA schools and whether they account for all relevant costs."]

[Request #S9152]

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SCHOOL VOUCHERS

What Does a Voucher Buy? A Closer Look at the Cost of Private Schools. By David F. Salisbury, Cato Institute. Policy Analysis No. 486. (The Institute, Washington, DC) August 28, 2003. 22 p.

Full Text at: www.cato.org/pubs/pas/pa486.pdf

["The Cato Institute surveyed all private schools in six disparate American cities. Five of the six cities surveyed (New Orleans, Houston, Denver, Charleston, and Philadelphia) are in states where school choice legislation has recently passed or is currently being considered. For Washington, D.C., the sixth city, the federal government is considering school choice legislation. The survey results indicate that for the 2002–03 school year, in each of those cities, the majority of private elementary schools charged $5,000 or less."]

[Request #S9153]

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EMPLOYMENT

EMPLOYEE BENEFITS

Analysis of the Economic Impacts of Mandatory Health Coverage In California. Prepared for the California Chamber of Commerce. (The Chamber, Sacramento, California) September 8, 2003. 40 p.

Full Text at: www.calchamber.com/pdf/sb2_analysis.pdf

["The purpose of this study is to determine the economic impact on California's businesses of SB 2. This proposed “play or pay” legislation would require medium size (20-199 employees) and large (200 employees or more) businesses to pay at least 80 percent of the premium for employee health insurance; large businesses also would be obligated to provide dependent coverage. Alternatively, these businesses could pay an undetermined user fee to the state for pooled state-purchased health-care coverage for the uninsured."]

[Request #S9154]

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ENERGY

ELECTRICITY INDUSTRY

Movin' Juice: Making Electricity Transmission More Competitive. By Lynne Kiesling and Adrian T. Moore, Reason Public Policy Institute. Policy Study No. 314. (The Institute, Los Angeles, California) September 2003. 29 p.

Full Text at: www.rppi.org/ps314.pdf

["Our recommendations encourage the use of distributed generation technology, innovative forms of contracting, and other institutional and technological changes that would increase the contestability of the transmission segment of the electricity value chain, and could do so in a flexible, open-ended way."]

[Request #S9155]

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ENVIRONMENT & NATURAL RESOURCES

CLIMATE CHANGE

Global Climate Change: CRS Issue Brief For Congress. By the Congressional Research Services, Library of Congress. (CRS, Washington, DC) September 8, 2003. 17 p.

Full Text at: www.usembassy.it/pdf/other/IB89005.pdf

["This report briefly reviews the status of climate science, international negotiations, and congressional activity focused specifically on climate change. It does not attempt to include the wide range of energy issues also relevant to climate change. These are covered in other CRS reports on energy efficiency, renewable energy, and energy generally."]

[Request #S9156]

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Governors Davis, Locke and Kulongoski Announce Tri-State Strategy to Reduce Global Warming: Press Release. By the Office of the Governor. (The Office, Sacramento, California) September 23, 2003. 1 p.

Full Text at: tinyurl.com/ofbu

["Governor Gray Davis and governors of Washington and Oregon announced a campaign to fight sooty diesel exhaust and emissions linked to global warming.... Under the plan, the three states would coordinate strategies to promote use of high-mileage, low-polluting hybrid cars; encourage energy-efficient buildings; cut tailpipe exhaust that contributes to smog and haze; and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.... the governors agreed to direct state agencies to draw up strategies by September 2004." Los Angeles Times (September 23, 2003) B6.]

[Request #S9157]

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Impacts of Climate Change on California's Water Systems: Discussion with Scientists. Presented to the California Assembly Select Committee on California Water Needs and Climate Change. August 25, 2003. Various pagings.

["Includes "Water: the Potential Consequences of Climate Variability and Change for the Water Resources of the United States;" "Global Climate Change: Potential Effects on the Sacramento-San Joaquin Watershed and the San Francisco Estuary;" "Potential Impacts of Climate Change on California Hydrology;" "Improving California Water Management: Optimizing Value and Flexibility;" "The Impacts of Climate Change for California's Water Resources;" "Climate Change Sensitivity Study of California Hydrology;" and "Climate Warming and California's Water Future."]

[Request #S9158]

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ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY

The Bottom Line. By Richard Ingram and Max Mallan. Business Environmental Alliance. (The Alliance, Santa Rosa, California) 2003. 8 p.

Full Text at: www.sonoma-county.org/bea/bottom_line_summer_2003.htm

[“Some California companies are increasingly taking steps to use environmentally friendly practices in their day-to-day business…. Showing companies how [conservation saves them money] makes … conservation an easy sell. It helps their bottom line. It is enlightened self-interest. It is being more efficient, but it is also being mindful of environment.”]

[Request #S9159]

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GENETIC ENGINEERING

An Update on Public Sentiment About Agricultural Biotechnology. By The Mellman Group and Public Opinion Strategies. Prepared for the Pew Initiative on Food and Biotechnology. (The Initiative, Washington, DC) September 15, 2003. 5 p.

Full Text at: pewagbiotech.org/research/2003update/2003summary.pdf

["Americans appear to know less about biotech foods than they did two years ago -- and much of what they do 'know' is wrong, according to nationwide survey results.... The survey shows that resistance to biotech foods is lessening, but that consumer opinions about the safety of those products remain as deeply divided as they were in Pew's base-line 2001 survey. Among its clearest conclusions, however, was that consumers want the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to take a more active role regulating genetically engineered foods." Sacramento Bee (September 18, 2003) A1.]

[Request #S9160]

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Monsanto Italia SpA and Others v. Presidenza del Consiglio dei Ministri. European Union, Court of Justice. C-236/01. September 9, 2003. 3 p.

Full Text at: www.europa.eu.int/cj/en/actu/communiques/cp03/aff/cp0367en.htm

["The European Union's high court ruled that Italy and other EU governments can temporarily ban genetically modified foods while they examine health risks, but must provide "detailed grounds," not general fears, to do so.... Industry groups took heart from the court's insistence on a solid justification for even a temporary ban, although the judges left the question of how much evidence is enough for national courts to decide." Sacramento Bee (September 10, 2003) D3.]

[Request #S9161]

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NATIONAL PARKS

Review of National Icon Park Security. By the Office of Inspector General, U.S. Department of the Interior. (The Office, Washington, DC) August 2003. 26 p.

Full Text at: www.oig.doi.gov/reports/2003i0063.pdf

["National icon park sites such as wind-swept Fort Point in San Francisco are woefully unprotected against terrorism, according to an Interior Department report.... The report said that park superintendents will have to reinvent their jobs and become security experts in addition to their responsibilities as professional custodians of the national parks.... The new report said that since Sept. 11, many park officers have been working 12-hour days, seven days a week for months on end. 'We have a concern about the long-term effectiveness of the protection staff and the officers who operate under these intense conditions,' the report said." San Francisco Chronicle (September 6, 2003) A3.]

[Request #S9162]

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WATER POLICY

Promoting Quality, Equity, and Latino Leadership in California Water Policy: An Introduction to Water Issues Impacting Latino Communities in California. By the Latino Issues Forum. (The Forum, San Francisco, California) 2003. 56 p.

Full Text at: www.lif.org/publications/water_report/water_report2003.pdf

["The report highlights the inequities that exist with regards to the provision of safe drinking water and the enforcement of water quality regulations in place designed to ensure that all Californians have safe drinking water.... The water quality problems faced by many isolated communities in the Central Valley are simply ignored by governmental agencies responsible for ensuring that all Californians have safe water to drink.... We found several situations in which officials were aware of water quality violations and yet chose to ignore the problem. It is appalling that rural Californians, many of them Latinos, are living in sub-standard and illegal conditions when it comes to water provision."]

[Request #S9163]

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GENERAL GOVERNMENT

AFFIRMATIVE ACTION

Ward Connerly v. Gray Davis, et al. Superior Court of Sacramento County. Verified complaint for Declaratory and Injunctive Relief. September 11, 2003.

[“Ward Connerly filed suit against state officials, claiming a newly signed law violates California's constitutional ban on race-based preferences. Connerly contends that AB 703 is an "end run" around Proposition 209, passed by voters in 1996 to prohibit preferences in state hiring, contracting and education…. Supporters of AB 703 contend that Proposition 209 bans discrimination by public agencies but does not define the term. The new law fills that gap, they say, by providing a definition that could legally benefit underrepresented racial groups.” Sacramento Bee (September 17, 2003) A4.]

Complaint. 11 p.
http://www.pacificlegal.org/briefs/ab703compl.pdf

Press release. 1 p.
http://www.pacificlegal.org/view_OpEnds.asp?iID=212

[Request #S9164]

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CAMPAIGN FINANCE

Grading State Disclosure 2003. By the Campaign Disclosure Project. (The Project, Los Angeles, California) September 2003. Various pagings.

Full Text at: www.campaigndisclosure.org/gradingstate/

["The findings of the study show that many changes could be made to improve state disclosure programs in each of the categories that were researched. States that performed well in one or two of the categories often performed very poorly in the other categories, and as a result did not receive good grades. In particular, significant progress can be made in the areas of accessibility to campaign finance information and web site usability. Half of the states failed in both data accessibility and web site usability and no state received an A in usability."]

[Request #S9165]

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EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

First Mayors' Report To the Nation: Tracking Federal Homeland Security Funds Sent To the 50 State Governments: A 168-City/50 State Survey. By the United States Conference of Mayors. (The Conference, Washington, DC)September 2003. 39 p.

Full Text at: www.usmayors.org/uscm/news/publications/homelandreport_0903.pdf

["Federal assistance to help cities guard against terrorism has been held up and diluted by bureaucratic red tape, and what trickles down to local police and fire agencies is not adequate to meet their critical needs, according to a report by the U.S. Conference of Mayors. The mayors' group said a survey of 168 cities in all 50 states found that most hadn't received their share of the $4 billion allocated months ago by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security for distribution to cities and counties." Los Angles Times (September 18, 2003) B3.]

[Request #S9166]

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GOVERNMENT CONTRACTS

An Update on the Bush Administration's Competitive Sourcing Initiative: Testimony. By Paul C. Light, New York University. Presented to the Senate Subcommittee on Oversight of Government Management, the Federal Workforce and the District of Columbia. (Brookings Institution, New York, New York) July 24, 2003. 16 p.

Full Text at: www.brookings.edu/dybdocroot/views/testimony/light/20030724.pdf

["The task force warned that the growing contract workforce was eroding the distinction between public and private.... For example, should a corporation created to provide services to Government and receiving 100 per cent of its financial support from Government be considered a 'public' or a 'private' agency? In what sense is a business corporation doing nearly 100 percent of its business with the Government engaged in 'free enterprise'? The task force clearly believed that there were times when contracting out was perfectly appropriate and times when it weakened the government’s core capacity to perform its mission.

[Request #S9167]

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GOVERNMENT INFORMATION

Politics and Science in the Bush Administration. By the Minority Staff Special Investigations Division, U. S. House of Representatives Committee on Government Reform. Prepared for Representative Henry A. Waxman. (The Committee, Washington, DC) August 2003. 40 p.

Full Text at: www.house.gov/reform/min/politicsandscience/pdfs/pdf_politics_and_science_rep.pdf

["The American people depend upon federal agencies to promote scientific research and to develop science-based policies that protect the nations health and welfare.... This report assesses the treatment of science and scientists by the Bush Administration. It finds numerous instances where the Administration had manipulated the scientific process and distracted or suppressed scientific findings."]

[Request #S9168]

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PRIVACY

Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act of 2003: H. R. 2622: Committee Print. By Representative Spencer Bachus, U.S. House of Representatives (Mortgage Bankers Association of America, Washington, DC) July 18, 2003. 49 p.

Full Text at: www.mbaa.org/industry/docs/03/hr2622_0718.pdf

["The House is expected to pass a bill that could nullify many of the consumer protections recently passed by several states that are trying to help identity theft victims and limit how businesses use people’s financial data.... The bill, HR 2622, updates the Fair Credit Reporting Act to include some sops for consumers, such as the right to a free annual credit report from each of the three credit bureaus. But the measure takes far more away by forbidding states from passing tougher privacy restrictions than the ones included in federal law." MSNBC (September 11, 2003) 1.]

[Request #S9169]

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STATE FINANCES

The Current State Fiscal Crisis and Its Aftermath. By Donald Boyd, The Nelson A. Rockefeller Institute of Government. Prepared for the Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured (The Commission, Washington, DC) September 2003. 53 p.

Full Text at: www.kff.org/content/2003/4138/4138.pdf

["This paper describes the root causes of the state fiscal crisis, examines trends in state revenues and spending, and offers a prognosis that states are likely to face continued fiscal stress for the next several years."]

[Request #S9170]

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HEALTH

AIDS

Injecting Reason: Human Rights and HIV Prevention for Injection Drug Users. California: A Case Study. By Jonathan Cohen. IN: Human Rights Watch, Vol. 15 no. 2 (September 2003) 63 p.

Full Text at: www.hrw.org/reports/2003/usa0903/usa0903full.pdf

["A human rights advocacy group accused police in California of routinely interfering with legitimate needle-exchange programs intended to slow the spread of HIV/AIDS and hepatitis C. [The report alleges] that police intent on enforcing drug laws often arrest or hassle patrons of locally approved needle-exchange programs throughout the state. The group said that police, in effect, are discouraging people from using a public health program that could save their lives." Los Angeles Times (September 10, 2003) Part 2, page 6]

[Request #S9171]

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CANCER

Cancer Statistics for Hispanics: 2003. By Kathryn O'Brien and others, American Cancer Society. IN CA, A Cancer Journal for Clinicians, vol. 53, no. 4 (July/August 2003) pp 208 - 226.

Full Text at: caonline.amcancersoc.org/cgi/reprint/53/4/208.pdf

["Further contributing to Hispanics' cancer risks, a greater number of Hispanics do not have access to a regular source of health care compared to non-Hispanic whites; 30.4% of Hispanics do not have a regular source of health care compared to 16.8% of non-Hispanic whites Researchers concluded that effective interventions to increase cancer screenings and physical activity and to reduce tobacco use and obesity are necessary to reduce cancer risk among Hispanics." Los Angeles Times (August 18, 2003) A1.]

[Request #S9173]

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COUNTY HEALTH CLINICS

Los Angeles County Department of Health Services: Despite Securing Additional Funding and Implementing Some Cost-Cutting Measures, It Still Faces Significant Challenges to Addressing Its Growing Budget Deficit. By the California State Auditor, Bureau of State Audits. (The Bureau, Sacramento, California) September 2003. 42 p.

Full Text at: www.bsa.ca.gov/bsa/pdfs/2002-019.pdf

[A systemwide reorganization designed to save the beleaguered Los Angeles County Health Services department hundreds of millions of dollars has become mired in legal challenges and drawn-out negotiations that threaten the department's future, according to an audit by state officials. The report offers a bracing counterpoint to an announcement by the health department last month that it had a year-end surplus $103 million higher than expected. According to the audit, the department faces a projected budget deficit of $345 million by 2006-07, even if it is adopts the cost-saving reorganization." Los Angeles Times (September 13, 2003) B3.]

[Request #S9174]

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HEALTH CARE

Who Receives Inpatient Charity Care in California? By Project Hope, Center for Health Affairs (The Project, Bethesda, Maryland) August 2003. 4 p.

Full Text at: www.projecthope.org/CHA/pdf/AugustHopeBriefF.pdf

["An estimated one-fifth of the non-elderly California population is medically uninsured. Although some of the uninsured may be eligible for public programs, many must choose between paying out of pocket for care, foregoing treatment, or seeking low or no-cost medical care through community clinics and county indigent care programs ... California law requires private non-profit hospitals to 'earn' their favorable tax status by conducting a needs assessment and developing a community benefit plan to respond to these needs; community benefits are not, however, required to include charity care.... The question of whether California hospitals, particularly non-profit providers, render a sufficient volume of charity care has been hotly debated."]

[Request #S9175]

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The Big Secret In Health Care: Rationing Is Here: Workers Who Are on the Front Lines Decide Who Gets What Treatment. By Geeta Anand. Health Club: Behind Medicare's Decisions: An Invisible Web of Gatekeepers. By Laurie McGinley. And To Sell Pricey Drug: Eli Lilly Fuels a Debate Over Rationing: It Rallies Doctors, Patients to Speak Out For Xigris, Even as Some Hospitals Balk. By Antonio Delgado. IN: The Wall Street Journal. (September 12, 2003 -September 18, 2003.) Various pagings.

["Health-care costs have skyrocketed, putting pressure on doctors, hospitals and patients. The rising costs have forced providers to take a hard look at the way expensive drugs and treatments are used."]

[Request #S9176]

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MARIJUANA

County of Santa Cruz et al. v. Ashcroft et. al. United States District Court for the Northern District of California. Order Denying Plaintiffs' Motion for Preliminary Injunction and Granting Defendants' Motion to Dismiss with Leave to Amend. August 28, 2003. 28 p.

Full Text at: www.drugpolicy.org/docUploads/Judge_Fogels_Decision.pdf

["A federal court in San Jose ruled Thursday against restraining U.S. drug agents from raiding a Santa Cruz cannabis co-operative that helps the ill and dying. U.S. District Judge Jeremy Fogel obliquely acknowledged that medicinal marijuana could alleviate pain but asserted that federal drug laws prevailed over the state's 1996 medicinal marijuana initiative." San Jose Mercury News (August, 29, 2003) A1.]

[Request #S9177]

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How State Medical Marijuana Laws Vary: A Comprehensive Review. By the Drug Policy Research Center. DPRC Research Brief (RAND, Santa Monica, California) 2003. 2 p.

Full Text at: www.rand.org/publications/RB/RB6012/RB6012.pdf

[“Although the federal government formally opposes using marijuana for medical purposes, many states have had laws enabling such use since the mid-1970’s. Driven by the attitudes of various medical, professional, and policy groups, these state laws have evolved in support of different positions, resulting in a patchwork of approaches. As of December 31, 2000, 26 states and the District of Columbia had laws enabling the medical use of marijuana under specific circumstances.”]

[Request #S9178]

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HOUSING

AFFORDABLE HOUSING

Out of Reach, 2003. By the National Low Income Housing Coalition. (The Coalition, Washington, DC) September 8, 2003. Various pagings.

Full Text at: www.nlihc.org/oor2003/

[The study places the national median housing wage at $15.21, an amount 37 percent higher than it was in 1999. However, the housing wage for California is $21.18, making it the second least affordable state in the nation after Massachusetts ($22.40). The study also found that California is home to five out of ten least affordable metropolitan areas, including San Jose ($35.02), followed by San Francisco ($34.13), Oakland ($27.31), Santa Cruz-Watsonville ($25.79), and Orange County ($23.46)." California Capitol Hill Bulletin (September 12, 2003) 3.

[Request #S9179]

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FEDERAL HOUSING PROGRAMS

Housing Funding Level Would Lead To More Than 60,000 Fewer Families Receiving Housing Voucher Assistance. By Barbara Sard and Will Fischer, Center On Budget and Policy Priorities. (The Center, Washington, DC) August 13, 2003. 16 p.

Full Text at: www.centeronbudget.org/8-13-03hous.pdf

["Analysis of the HUD data shows that if the House funding level is enacted and no additional resources become available from other sources, approximately 63,000 vouchers expected to be in use serving low-income families at the start of the fiscal year will not be funded.... The Administration and Congress can agree to provide more funds for the voucher program or they can identify additional funds already available at HUD from prior year appropriations or other sources that can be used to cover the vouchers that would otherwise be left unfunded."]

[Request #S9181]

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HUMAN SERVICES

CHILD CARE

Department of Social Services: Continuing Weaknesses in the Department's Community Care Licensing Programs May Put the Health and Safety of Vulnerable Clients at Risk. By the California State Auditor, Bureau of State Audits. (The Bureau, Sacramento, California) August 2003. 146 p.

Full Text at: www.bsa.ca.gov/bsa/pdfs/2002-114.pdf

["We found that the department has been more selective when granting criminal history exemptions since we issued our August 2000 report. However, the department could further improve the thoroughness of its criminal history reviews.... We also found that the department's management and investigations of subsequent criminal history reports has been inadequate."]

[Request #S9182]

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CHILDREN

Child Welfare: Enhanced Federal Oversight of Title IV-B Could Provide States Additional Information to Improve Services. By the U.S. General Accounting Office. GAO-03-956. The Office, Washington, DC) September 2003. 61 p.

Full Text at: www.gao.gov/new.items/d03956.pdf

["This report describes (1) the services provided and populations served under subparts 1 and 2; (2) federal oversight of subpart 1; and (3) existing research on the effectiveness of services unique to subpart 1—that is, when states used subpart 1, but not subpart 2, to fund programs in a particular service category. The report focuses primarily on subpart 1 because little research exists on this subpart, while studies have been conducted on subpart 2."]

[Request #S9183]

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FOOD STAMPS

Updating California's Food Stamp Vehicle Policy. By the California Budget Project. (The Project, Sacramento, California) September 2003. 3 p.

Full Text at: www.cbp.org/2003/030915FoodStamps.pdf

["California’s food stamp vehicle policy prevents many poor families that depend on reliable cars to get to and from work from receiving benefits. To be eligible for food stamps, applicants must demonstrate that their income and assets are below a certain level. Currently, motor vehicles are counted toward the food stamp asset limit to the extent a vehicle’s fair market value exceeds $4,650. This low vehicle limit can prevent low-income working families with reliable vehicles from qualifying for food stamps."]

[Request #S9184]

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TEMPORARY ASSISTANCE FOR NEEDY FAMILIES

The Senate Finance Committee's TANF Reauthorization Bill. By Sharon Parrott and Shawn Fremstad. Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, Washington, DC) September 15, 2003. 17 p.

Full Text at: www.centeronbudget.org/9-9-03tanf.pdf

The bill provides only $1 billion over five years in additional child care funding, far below what is needed just to allow states to maintain their current child care programs.... benefits. If funding is not increased by more than $200 million per year, hundreds of thousands of children in low-income working families will lose access to child care assistance in the coming years."]

[Request #S9185]

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WELFARE

"What Happens to Families When They Leave Welfare? By Thomas Macurdy and others. Public Policy Institute, San Francisco. (The Institute, San Francisco, California) September 2003. 118 p.

Full Text at: www.ppic.org/content/pubs/R_903TMR.pdf

["According to the report, 70 percent of single parent households and 55 percent of two-parent households were making enough money to live above the federal poverty line. .... Unused assistance is identified as a significant barrier to the advancement of many families. The report's authors recommend greater information dissemination and publicity of post-welfare benefits to those families leaving welfare as an important consideration for policymakers." Capitol Hill Bulletin (September 12, 2003) 3.]

[Request #S9186]

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TRANSPORTATION

LIGHT RAIL

Integration of Transit and Land Use: A Study of Los Angeles Rail Transit Stations. By Susan M. Herre, University of California, Los Angeles. (The Author, Los Angeles, California) 2003. 118 p.

[" When transit projects are located in existing activity centers, there can be long-term potential for ridership growth and transit-supportive land use development. This is good transit planning. By contrast, avoiding the challenge of reinvestment and reinvention of existing centers, or taking the path of least resistance in favor of first-cost containment, can in the long run be a terrible waste of precious transit resources. The Los Angeles rail transit system contains examples of both the good and the bad."]

[Request #S9187]

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WASHINGTON READER

California Capitol Hill Bulletin. By the California Institute for Federal Policy Research. Vol. 10, Bulletin 26-27. (The Institute, Washington, DC) September 18-26, 2003. 6 p.

Full Text at: www.calinst.org/bulletins/b1027.pdf

[Includes: "Senate Passes Energy & Water Appropriations;" "Senate Judiciary Examines H-1B Visa Impact;" "August Unemployment Rates Released;" Congress Extends Welfare and Transportation Programs through Winter;" "House Approves Water Resources Development Act;" "Senate Passes FY 2004 Interior Appropriations; Includes $200 Million for Lake Tahoe;" "United House Committee Acts on Graduate and International Studies Bills;" "Agreement Reportedly Reached to Strip Special Education Funding Boost;" and others.]

[Request #S9188]

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STUDIES TO COME
[The following studies, reports, and documents have been ordered or requested, but have not yet arrived. Requests may be placed, and copies will be provided when the material arrives.]

EDUCATION

SEXUAL HARASSMENT

Sexual Harassment in Schools and Athletics Programs: The Administrator's Guide to the Prevention of Sexual Harassment and Sexual Harassment Claims in Schools and Athletics Programs. By Lee E. Green. (Sports Law Publishing, Baldwin, Kansas) 2003.

[Includes: "Legal Standards Applicable to schools and Athletics Programs;" "Summaries and Full-Text Versions of Landmark U.S. Supreme Court Cases;" "Educational Materials for Conducting In-House Training Programs;" and others. NOTE: Sexual Harassment ... will be available for 3-day loan.]

[Request #S9191]

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GENERAL GOVERNMENT

COURTS

Federal Rule of Appellate Procedure 32.1. Proposed by Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts. (The Office, Washington, DC) 2003.

["The Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts recently proposed a significant amendment to the Federal Rules of Appellate Procedure. The amendment—which, if adopted, would go into effect in December 2005 or later—would permit lawyers, in their briefs to the federal appeals courts, to cite even those opinions that are formally designated as “unpublished” or “non-precedential.”... this body of law is substantial: roughly eighty percent of cases adjudicated by our federal appeals courts set no binding precedent." Find Law's Legal Commentary (September 2, 2003) 1.]

[Request #S9192]

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HEALTH

ALCOHOL & DRUG USE

Reducing Underage Drinking: A Collective Responsibility. By Richard J. Bonnie and Mary Ellen O'Connell, Committee on Developing a Strategy to Reduce and Prevent Underage Drinking, Institute of Medicine National Research Council of the National Academies. (The Academies, Washington, DC) 2003. 304 p.

Full Text at: www.nap.edu/books/0309089352/html/

["The committee's basic charge is to provide science-based recommendations about how best to prevent and reduce underage drinking. Based on its expertise .... the committee identified [several] categories of programs or interventions including: media campaigns; educational activities; community-based initiatives; and more"]

[Request #S9172]

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OBESITY

"Relationship Between Urban Sprawl and Physical Activity, Obesity, and Morbidity." By Reid Ewing, National Center for Smart Growth, and others. IN: American Journal of Health Promotion, vol. 18, no. 1 (2003) pp. 47-57.

["Residents of counties that contain large amounts of urban sprawl walk less, weigh more and are at a greater risk of developing high blood pressure, according to a study. The study is the first large-scale, national study to link sprawl with negative health outcomes and to quantify them ." Wall Street Journal (August 29, 2003) 1.]

[Request #S9193]

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