Subject: Studies in the News 03-64 (October 2, 2003)


CALIFORNIA RESEARCH BUREAU
CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY
Studies in the News
Children and Family Supplement


Contents This Week

Introductory Material CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT
   Childrens' behavior and intimate partner violence
ECONOMY
   Earnings necessary to cover basic costs
EDUCATION
   Unionization and quality in early childhood programs
   UPK is not the answer
   Well-trained teachers for preschoolers
HEALTH
   Dental care in schools
   Dental access for low-income children
   Insurance for low-income working parents
   Mental health services in school
HUMAN SERVICES
   Child care assistance and self-sufficiency
   Giving voice to low-income parents
   Implementing change in child welfare programs
STUDIES TO COME
   Value in early childhood education
Introduction to Studies in the News

Studies in the News is a very current compilation of items significant to the Legislature and Governor's Office. It is created weekly by the State Library's Research Bureau to supplement the public policy debate in California’s Capitol. To help share the latest information with state policymakers, these reading lists are now being made accessible through the State Library’s website. This week's list of current articles in various public policy areas is presented below.

Service to State Employees:

  • When available, the URL for the full text of each item is provided.

  • Items in the State Library collection can be checked out to state officials and staff.

  • Access to all materials listed will be provided by the State Information Reference Center, either by e-mail to cslsirc@library.ca.gov or by calling 654-0261.

The following studies are currently on hand:

CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

"Behaviors of Children Who Are Exposed and Not Exposed to Intimate Partner Violence: An Analysis of 330 Black, White, and Hispanic Children." By Judith M. McFarlane, Texas Women's University, College of Nursing, and others. IN: Pediatrics, vol. 112, no. 3 (September 2003) pp. e202- e207.

Full Text at: pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/reprint/112/3/e202.pdf

["This study compared the behaviors of black, white, and Hispanic children who were 18 months to 18 years of age and exposed to intimate partner violence with an age- and ethnically similar sample of children who were not exposed to violence and to compare both exposed and nonexposed children to normative samples. It found that children, ages 6 to 18 years, of abused mothers exhibit significantly more internalizing, externalizing, and total behavior problems than children for the same age and sex of nonabused mothers. These children of abused mothers are clearly suspended above normal and below deviant, with children ages 6 to 18 being at the greatest risk."]

[Request #S9194]

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ECONOMY

INCOME

Making Ends Meet: How Much Does It Cost To Raise a Family in California? By the California Budget Project. (The Project, Sacramento, California) October 2003. 34 p.

Full Text at: www.cbp.org./2003/2003MEMfinal.pdf

["Bare-bones household costs for a two-income family of four in the Bay Area now top $70,000 a year, an increase of 14 percent since 2001, a new study has found. The full-time breadwinners must earn a combined $33.76 an hour to cover food, shelter, transportation and other basic costs, the study concluded." San Francisco Chronicle (October 1, 2003) A1.]

[Request #S9195]

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EDUCATION

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

Unionization and Quality in Early Childhood Programs. By Gillian Doherty and Barry Forer. (Canadian Union of Public Employees, Ottawa, Ontario) 2002. [September 13, 2003.] 66 p.

Full Text at: cupe.ca/updir/UnionizationQualityReport-adb.pdf

["This study indicates that unionization not only has a positive impact on child care workers, but also on children in unionized centres, their parents and society. In other words, unionization of child care workers is good public policy. Specifically, the study found that: wages and benefits for teaching staff are substantially better in unionized centres; turnover rates for teachers are lower in unionized centres; a significantly higher proportion of unionized centres act in ways that predict or are associated with higher levels of quality; and, unionized centres score higher on an overall program quality measurement than non-unionized centres."]

[Request #S9196]

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A Brighter Future: Solutions to Policy Issues Affecting America's Children. Why Universal Preschool Will Not Help Children. By Darcy Ann Olsen, Goldwater Institute. (Pacific Research Institute, San Francisco, California) May 2003. 9 p.

Full Text at: www.commonwealthfoundation.org/education/PRIchapter7.pdf

["According to this report, when parents control education spending, schools that can't teach shut down and schools where children excel and look forward to learning flourish. Legislators should reject universal preschool and instead work to return education dollars, education choice, and education power to parents. Empowering parents through school choice will improve educational opportunities for all children."]

[Request #S9197]

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Bachelor Degrees Are Best: Higher Qualifications For Pre-Kindergarten Teachers Lead to Better Learning Environments For Children. By Marcy Whitebook, Center for the Study of Child Care Employment, U.C. Berkeley. Prepared for the Trust for Early Education. (The Center, Berkeley, California) 2003. 24 p.

Full Text at: www.trustforearlyed.org/docs/WhitebookFinal.pdf

["The gap in new kindergartners' knowledge and readiness to learn is widening -- spurring advocates to turn their attention to quality pre-school programs. Researcher Marcy Whitebook concludes that pre-K teachers who have at least a bachelor's degree coupled with specialized training in early childhood development and education provide the best preparation to help pre-kindergartners advance to kindergarten classrooms." Connect for Kids Weekly (September 29, 2003).]

[Request #S9198]

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HEALTH

DENTAL CARE

School-Based Dental Care: Spreading Smiles Through Schools. By the Center for Health and Health Care in Schools, George Washington University. (The Center, Washington, DC) Summer 2003. 8 p.

Full Text at: www.healthinschools.org/cfk/dent_broch.pdf

["According to this brochure, cost and lack of availability keep most low-income parents from getting their kids the needed dental care. The school-based dental services address this problem by providing screening, cleaning, sealants, restorative care, and classroom education. The 2000 Surgeon General's report on oral health found that 'more than 51 million school hours are lost each year to dental-related illnesses.'" CDF Child Health Information Project (September 26, 2003).]

[Request #S9199]

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State Innovations to Improve Dental Access for Low-Income Children: A Compendium. By the American Dental Association. (The Association, Chicago, Illinois) September 16, 2003. Various Pagings.

Full Text at: www.prnewswire.com/mnr/ada/11207/#

["For this report, the ADA analyzed data from Medicaid and the State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP). The report presents information on barriers to care (including Medicaid financing, program administration, and patient compliance and awareness) identified by dentists who participate in Medicaid and SCHIP. The report is intended for use by policymakers, program administrators, health professionals, and others interested in improving children's access to oral health care." MCH Alert (September 26, 2003).]

[Request #S9200]

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HEALTH INSURANCE

Who Enrolls in a Program For Parents of Publicly Insured Children? By Erin Fries Taylor and others, California Health Care Foundation. (The Foundation, Oakland, California) 2003. 12 p.

Full Text at: www.healthaffairs.org/WebExclusives/2206Taylor.pdf

["Although interest in expanding SCHIP coverage to parents has grown over the past five years, few such expansions have actually been implemented. State governments and health plan administrators remain concerned that these expansions will attract only high-risk enrollees, resulting in costly premiums that require large subsidies. We examine characteristics of enrollees in an SCHIP-like expansion program in Alameda County, California. According to our survey data, the program did not experience unfavorable selection. Rather, it attracted a broad range of eligible adults. Enrollees were comparable to the overall low-income population in Alameda County in terms of age, health status, and various utilization measures."]

[Request #S9201]

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MENTAL HEALTH

School-Based Mental Health Services: Meeting the Needs of Children. By the Center for Health and Health Care in Schools, George Washington University. (The Center, Washington, DC) Summer 2003. 8 p.

Full Text at: www.healthinschools.org/cfk/ment_broch.pdf

["According to this brochure, providing mental health services through school-based centers allows students to access the services easily and in a familiar environment. Some school-based health centers include psychologists, licensed clinical social workers, and bilingual enrollment specialists on their staff. The centers also are able to provide services to minority children and youth, the rural poor, and the children of new immigrants who are among those with the greatest need and least access to mental health services." CDF Child Health Information Project (September 26, 2003).]

[Request #S9203]

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HUMAN SERVICES

CHILD CARE

Making the Case for Increasing Federal Child Care Funding: A Fact Sheet. By Jennifer Mezey, Center for Law and Social Policy. (CLASP, Washington, DC) September 26, 2003. 5 p.

Full Text at: www.clasp.org/DMS/Documents/1064524921.76/CC_fact_sheet.pdf

["Child care assistance is an essential part of any strategy to help families leave or avoid welfare, maintain employment, and become self-sufficient. This fact sheet argues that: many low-income families are barely making it and need child care assistance; a Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) reauthorization bill that is not accompanied by an adequate increase in child care funding will cause low-income children to lose child care assistance; even without new welfare work requirements, states already lack adequate child care resources; and as a result of declining TANF reserves, along with historic state fiscal crises, many states are cutting programs for low-income families, including child care." Moving Ideas News (October 1, 2003).]

[Request #S9204]

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LOW INCOME

Hope in the Face of Adversity: The Perspective of Low-Income American Parents on the Challenges of Parenting. By Trevor Neilson and others. (Casey Family Programs, Seattle, Washington) 2003. 16 p.

Full Text at: www.casey.org/documents/prevention_report_1.pdf

["Political debates over support for poor families often center on whether these families are fundamentally different in character from their more affluent peers. This new report gives low-wage parents a chance to speak for themselves. With family and community budgets so tight, many parents report difficulties finding affordable housing, child care, transportation and family educational and recreational activities. Most want to learn the skills they need for better jobs, and want help managing a budget and avoiding predatory lending. Many low-income parents also say that a few more educational and financial resources would make a big difference, helping them relieve the stress on their families and stabilize their circumstances." Connect for Kids Weekly (September 29, 2003).]

[Request #S9205]

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WELFARE

Improving the Performance and Outcomes of Child Welfare Through State Program Improvement Plans (PIPS.) By James Harrell, Center for the Study of Social Policy. (The Center, Washington, DC) May 2003. 86 p.

Full Text at: www.cssp.org/uploadFiles/2515_CSSP_FINAL.pdf

["This paper presents background information on the federal legislative and regulatory context for the Child and Family Service Reviews (CFSRs) and the Program Improvement Plan (PIP), and identifies the principles and guidelines for program improvement. Perhaps the most compelling section of the paper is a close look at five states that have completed program improvement plans. The five state review highlights important themes that are emerging in the PIP reform agenda, and the study of these states' efforts provides insights into the variations in approaches that are useful in defining the major principles and guidelines that are important in developing a successful program improvement plan."]

[Request #S9202]

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STUDIES TO COME
[The following studies, reports, and documents have been ordered or requested, but have not yet arrived. Requests may be placed, and copies will be provided when the material arrives.]

EDUCATION

INTELLIGENCE TESTING

"." By Eric Turkheimer, University of Virginia. IN: Psychological Science, vol. 14, no. 6 (November 2003)

["Genes do explain the vast majority of IQ differences among children in wealthier families, the new work shows. But environmental factors -- not genetic deficits -- explain IQ differences among poor minorities. The results suggest that early childhood assistance programs such as Head Start can help the poor and are worthy of public support.... When Turkheimer tested ... a population of poor and mostly black children, it become clear that, in fact, the influence of genes on IQ was significantly lower in conditions of poverty, where environmental deficits overwhelm genetic potential." Washington Post (September 2, 2003) A1.] Note: An e-mail was sent to the author 10/2 requesting the title and availability of the article. Hopefully we will hear by tomorrow. CH

[Request #S9206]

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