Subject: Studies in the News 04-50 (July 28, 2004)


First Five California Logo California State Library Logo
Studies in the News
Children and Family Supplement


Contents This Week

Introductory Material ECONOMY
   Economic analysis of early education
EDUCATION
   Critique of First 5 and county commissions
   Combining care and education for young children
   Salaries/benefits for early education workforce
   Costs of school readiness
HEALTH
   Hispanic children and health care access
   Insuring California children
   Screening for Medicaid and SCHIP
   Aggressive behavior and young children
HUMAN SERVICES
   Financial resources for child care
   Staffing crisis in children/family services
   Food stamps and children/families
   Grandparents taking care of kids
STUDIES TO COME
   Immunization and childcare facilities
Introduction to Studies in the News

Studies in the News: Children and Family Supplement is a service provided to the First 5 California by the California State Library. The service features weekly lists of current articles focusing on Children and Family policy. Prior lists can be viewed from the California State Library's Web site at www.library.ca.gov/CRB/SITN/.

How to Obtain Materials Listed in SITN:

  • When available on the Internet, the URL for the full-text of each item is provided.

  • California State Employees may contact the State Information & Reference Center (916-654-0206; cslsirc@library.ca.gov) with the SITN issue number and the item number [S#].

  • All other interested individuals should contact their local library - the items may be available there, or may be borrowed by your local library on your behalf.

The following studies are currently on hand:

ECONOMY

CHILDREN

Investing in New York: An Economic Analysis of the Early Care and Education Sector. By Mildred Warner and others, the Cornell University Department of City and Regional Planning. Prepared for the New York State Child Care Coordinating Council. (The Council, Albany, New York) 2004. 60 p.

Full Text at: www.nyscccc.org/FinalReport4-22-2004.pdf

["New York’s child care industry supports businesses and workers, and contributes to economic activity through its own sectoral linkages. An investment in a high quality early care and education system promotes New York’s long-term future, in part because good early education is the critical first step in preparing skilled workers to fuel the state’s knowledge economy. Jobs in areas such as electronic manufacturing, software and computer-related industries are some of the nation’s most important sources of growth, with average wages 73% higher than in the rest of the economy. Ranking eleventh nationally in the number of knowledge economy jobs, New York has strong reasons to use early care and education to maintain and strengthen its leadership in this area."]

[Request #S3517]

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EDUCATION

AUDITS AND INVESTIGATIONS

California Children and Families Commissions: Some County Commissions' Contracting Practices Are Lacking, and Both the State and County Commissions Can Improve Their Efforts to Find Funding Partners and Collect Data on Program Performance. By the California State Auditor, Bureau of State Audits. Report 2003-123. (The Auditor, Sacramento, California) July 2004. 96 p.

Full Text at: www.bsa.ca.gov/bsa/pdfs/2003-123.pdf

["Use of Prop. 10 Funds Faulted: A state audit of five counties finds most money for child programs unspent. The report said some county panels set up to distribute the Proposition 10 money kept incomplete records, did not establish clear rules for hiring contractors or failed to evaluate the effectiveness of the programs they did fund." Los Angeles Times (July 16, 2004) 1.]

[Request #S3508]

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EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

Putting the Child Back Into Child Care: Combining Care and Education for Children Ages 3-5. By Jessica Brauner, Yale University, and others. Social Policy Report. Vol.18, No. 3. (Society for Research in Child Development, Ann Arbor, Michigan) 2004. 16 p.

Full Text at: www.srcd.org/SPR18_3.pdf

["In this report, the authors propose two recommendations to help improve the quality of child care in the United States. First, they assert that an infrastructure that combines care and education must be built. One approach is to place educational components into the child care system. A more enduring approach is to place care into the educational system. Second, in order to have a successful child care system, it is first necessary to reframe the relationship between care and education. This effort can be mounted on several fronts, and can be carried out by changing the current terminology and constituency of child care and increasing parental and societal awareness of the components and benefits of quality care. Only when this happens, will the state of child care begin to improve. Without the help and commitment of informed adults, the needs of children will continue to be left unmet, having harmful consequences not only for our youngest citizens but also for the future of our nation and society."]

[Request #S3518]

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Current Data on the Salaries and Benefits of the U.S. Early Childhood Education Workforce. By the Center for the Child Care Workforce. (The Center, Washington, DC) 2004. 52 p.

Full Text at: www.ccw.org/pubs/CompendiumFINAL.pdf

["This report offers a state-by-state breakdown of wages for child care workers and preschool and kindergarten teachers, which demonstrates how poorly paid early care and education staff are compared to other education professionals. Child care workers' mean hourly wage is $8.32 and preschool teachers' is $10.67, compared to kindergarten teachers, who earn $20.38."]

[Request #S3519]

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SCHOOL READINESS

The Price of School Readiness: A Tool for Estimating the Cost of Universal Preschool in the States. By Stacie Carolyn Golin, Institute for Women's Policy Research, and Anne W. Mitchell, Early Childhood Policy Research. (The Institute, Washington, DC) 2004. 64 p.

Full Text at: www.iwpr.org/pdf/G713.pdf

["This report details an approach to estimating the cost of a state-based, high-quality, universally accessible preschool program for children age three through five. The model is based on the assumption that a preschool system must be built from existing early childhood education arrangements and that a major factor contributing to quality is the presence of adequately trained and compensated teachers. The model also assumes that substantial investments would be needed in a number of infrastructure supports such technical assistance and monitoring, professional development, assessment and evaluation, and facilities renovation and construction."]

[Request #S3520]

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HEALTH

ACCESS TO CARE

Access to Health Care Among Hispanic/Latino Children: United States, 1998-2001. By Gulnur Scott and Hanyu Ni. Advance Data from Vital and Health Statistics. No. 344. (National Center for Health Statistics, Hyattsville, Maryland) 2004. 24 p.

Full Text at: www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/ad/ad344.pdf

["The report states that each year, an estimated 3 million Hispanic/Latino children lacked health insurance coverage at the time of interview and over the past 15 years, Hispanic/Latino children are at the greatest risk of not having access to healthcare. Of the five Hispanic/Latino subgroups, Mexican children were most likely to lack health insurance coverage, followed by Central or South American children. Of all the subgroups, Cuban children were most likely to have regular access to health care." Children's Defense Fund: Child Health Information Project Listserv (July 16, 2004).]

[Request #S3521]

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CHILDREN

Many Uninsured Children Qualify for Medi-Cal or Healthy Families. By Carolyn A. Mendez-Luck and others, UCLA Center for Health Policy Research. Policy Brief. (The Center, Los Angeles, California) June 2004. 8 p.

Full Text at: www.healthpolicy.ucla.edu/pubs/files/ChildEligibility_PB_Final07062004.pdf

["This policy brief describes the number of uninsured California children who were eligible for public health insurance coverage through Medi-Cal or Healthy Families. The report presents findings for the state, congressional, senatorial and assembly districts, county and for the Los Angeles region by service planning area. Findings include: Almost 1.5 million California children did not have health insurance coverage for all or part of the year; About 900,000 of the uninsured California children were eligible for either Medi-Cal or Healthy Families; 300,000 children in Los Angeles County were uninsured yet eligible for insurance; and, one in five children in the Los Angeles Metro area were uninsured and eligible for insurance."]

[Request #S3522]

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MEDICAID

Screening for Medicaid and State Children's Health Insurance (SCHIP) Program Eligibility. By Cheryl Fish-Parcham, Health Assistance Partnership. (Families USA, Washington, DC) January 2004. 42 p.

Full Text at: www.healthassistancepartnership.org/site/DocServer/FINAL_Screening_for_MA.pdf?docID=901

["This publication, originally written for consumer health assistance programs, lists screening questions to help determine if someone is eligible for Medicaid or SCHIP. It also provides and overview of the relevant laws and regulations, explains where to get state-specific information, and can be used to create a state-specific screening tool."

[Request #S3446]

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PUBLIC HEALTH

"Physical Aggression During Early Childhood: Trajectories and Predictors." By Richard E. Tremblay and others. IN: Pediatrics, vol. 114, no. 1 (July 2004) pp. e43-e50.

["This study was designed to try to identify babies and young children who are most at risk of having lifelong problems with their inability to control aggressive behavior. The idea is that these children can be taught to control their aggressive impulses before they start school and avoid trouble when they grow older.... They found the four risk factors that together mean a baby is 11 times more at risk of being a chronically aggressive child. They are: having a mother who started having babies when she was 20 or younger; having a mother with high levels of anti-social behavior before the end of high school, such as running away from home, being involved with youth protection or the police, starting fights and stealing more than once; having a mother who smoked during pregnancy; being born into a low-income family." The Argus (July 7, 2004).]

[Request #S3523]

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HUMAN SERVICES

CHILD CARE

The Matrix of Financial Resources for Child Care Facilities Development in California. By the National Economic Development and Law Center. (The Center, Oakland, California) June 2004. 60 p.

Full Text at: www.buildingchildcare.org/FINAL%20Matrix%202004.pdf

["Designed to help child care providers and child care advocates identify and access financial assistance to build, purchase, expand and/or renovate child care centers and family child care homes in California. This publication contains a matrix of lending institutions (credit unions, community development financial institutions, conventional banks) that offer loan products for child care facilities development. Includes loan source, purpose, loan amount/type, term/interest rate, eligibility and contact information. Updated in 2004, this list of financial resources is divided by region: Northern California, Greater Bay Area, Central Valley and Coast, and Southern California."]

[Request #S3524]

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CHILDREN

"Who's Taking Care? Advocasey Examines the Staffing Crisis in Children and Family Services [Issue Theme.]" By the Annie E. Casey Foundation. IN: Advocasey, vol. 6, no. 1 (Spring 2004) pp. 1-40.

Full Text at: www.aecf.org/publications/data/advocasey_spring04.pdf

["Staffing shortages and workforce issues continue to impact the quality and availability of child and family services around the country. This issue of Advocasey tackles the topics of burnout and staffing shortages among frontline human services workers. The issue first cites statistics on the numbers of workers leaving and entering the field (40+ percent annual turnover), as well as on-the-job dangers (more than half of child welfare workers are victims of violence or threats on the job) and low levels of pay. To address these concerns, the publication then presents a series of articles highlighting promising practices in agencies around the country." Children's Bureau Express (June 2004).]

[Request #S3525]

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FOOD STAMPS

Recent Trends in Food Stamp Participation Among Poor Families with Children. By Sheila R. Zedlewski and Kelly Rader, the Urban Institute. Discussion Papers. 04-03. (The Institute, Washington, DC) June 2004. 38 p.

Full Text at: www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/311027_DP04-03.pdf

["Food stamp caseloads increased dramatically between October 2000 and October 2003. This study examines whether new program rules and procedures increased participation rates for families with children. Our results show that families recently on welfare were substantially more likely to participate in the Food Stamp program in 2002 than in 1997 or 1999. In contrast, participation rates for families with no cash welfare experience, the largest share of poor families with children, remained quite low throughout the period. The new program rules and procedures did not affect their participation. Nonparticipating families are more likely to have characteristics associated with shorter term economic deprivation than participating families, but their low current incomes and levels of economic hardship indicate that food stamps would benefit these families substantially. States could encourage more families to take advantage of food stamps by strengthening public outreach and adopting new options to simplify their programs."]

[Request #S3526]

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GRANDPARENTS

Grandma and Grandpa Taking Care of the Kids: Patterns of Involvement. By Lina Guzman. Child Trends Research Brief. No. 2004-17. (Child Trends, Washington, DC) July 2004. 8 p.

Full Text at: www.childtrends.org/files/grandparentsRB.pdf

["This study presents a statistical snapshot of grandparental care in the U.S. For example, the brief reports that close to half (47 percent) of grandparents with young children living nearby report providing some type of child care assistance to their adult children. And though grandmothers are more likely (54 percent) to provide this care, roughly one-third (38 percent) of grandfathers do so as well." Child Trends E-Newsletter (July 26, 2004).]

[Request #S3527]

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STUDIES TO COME
[The following studies, reports, and documents have been ordered or requested, but have not yet arrived. Requests may be placed, and copies will be provided when the material arrives.]

HEALTH

DAY CARE

"Immunization Requirements for Childcare Programs: Are They Enough?" By Carol A. Stanwyck, National Immunization Program, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and others. IN: American Journal of Preventive Medicine, vol. 27, issue 2 (August 2004) pp. 161-163.

["School immunization legislation has resulted in high vaccination coverage rates and low rates of vaccine-preventable disease among school children. Similar legislation has been directed toward children in licensed and regulated childcare programs. The purpose of this investigation was to compare immunization coverage among children in and not in childcare.... Conclusions: Immunization legislation and regulations have been successful in increasing coverage rates in the school population. Similar legislation for childcare facilities appears not to have been as effective. Given these findings, it seems that new strategies are needed to increase coverage in preschool children."]

[Request #S3528]

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