Subject: Studies in the News 04-77 (November 29, 2004)


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Children and Families Commission


Contents This Week

Introductory Material

EDUCATION
   Early childhood longitudinal birth cohort study
   Universal pre-k strategic campaign
   Early childhood behavioral health
   Universal pre-k in California
   State of state preschool
   High/Scope Perry at 40
HEALTH
   Cultural competence in health care
   Antidepressants and children
   Parenting environments and children's aggression
   Children and health insurance variations
   Immigrant mothers' parenting and children's development
HUMAN SERVICES
   Telephone hotlines for parents of young children
   Child development and relationship environments
   Techniques for strengthening families
STUDIES TO COME
   Fostering children's literacy
Introduction to Studies in the News

Studies in the News: Children and Family Supplement is a service provided to the First 5 California by the California State Library. The service features weekly lists of current articles focusing on Children and Family policy. Prior lists can be viewed from the California State Library's Web site at www.library.ca.gov/CRB/SITN/.

How to Obtain Materials Listed in SITN:

  • When available on the Internet, the URL for the full-text of each item is provided.

  • California State Employees may contact the State Information & Reference Center (916-654-0206; cslsirc@library.ca.gov) with the SITN issue number and the item number [S#].

  • All other interested individuals should contact their local library - the items may be available there, or may be borrowed by your local library on your behalf.

The following studies are currently on hand:

EDUCATION

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

Children Born in 2001: First Results from the Base Year of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study Birth Cohort (ECLS-B.) By Kristin Denton Flanagan, Educational Statistics Services Institute, and Jerry West, National Center for Education Statistics. (The Center, Washington, DC) November 2004. 49 p.

Full Text at: nces.ed.gov/pubs2005/2005036.pdf

["This new publication provides descriptive information about children born in the United States in 2001. It presents information on certain child and family characteristics, on children’s mental and physical skills, on children’s first experiences in child care, and on the fathers of these children. The report profiles data from a nationally representative sample of children at about 9 months of age both overall, and for various subgroups (i.e., male and female, children from different racial/ethnic groups, and children living in different types of families)."]

[Request #S4481]

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Early Education for All: A Strategic Political Campaign for High-Quality Early Education in Massachusetts. By Melissa Ludtke, Foundation for Child Development. FCD Working Paper: Advocating for PK-3. No. 5. (The Foundation, New York, New York) October 2004. 82 p.

Full Text at: www.fcd-us.org/uploadDocs/WP5EarlyEducationforAll.pdf

["This report demonstrates how to build a successful political movement around universal pre-kindergarten, drawing on the example of the Massachusetts Early Education for All campaign. It includes a chronology of the communications, organizing and advocacy efforts that led to statewide legislation in 2004." Connect for Kids (November 1, 2004) 1.]

[Request #S4482]

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Third-Year Implementation and Second-Year Outcome Study of the Children's Behavioral Health Initiative, Palm Beach County, Florida. By Julie Spielberger and others, Chapin Hall Center for Children, University of Chicago. (The Center, Chicago, Illinois) May 2004. 29 p.

["This is the third report of the findings from a 4-year implementation and 3-year outcome evaluation of the Palm Beach County, Florida Children's Behavioral Health Initiative (CBHI), an effort providing schools with behavioral health professionals to identify social and emotional problems in young children and offer referral and follow up services. Implementation data indicate that the CBHI program continued to be successfully implemented in the 2002-2003 school year. Second year child outcome data indicate that children at CBHI schools also were found to have better attendance and a lower rate of discipline-related referrals than children at comparison schools."]

[Request #S4483]

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PRESCHOOL

"Toddler Tech: Making the Case for Universal Preschool." By Carol Brydolf, California School Boards Association. IN: California Schools (Winter 2004) 6 p.

["'It's like finding out that there's an effective polio vaccine,' says former State Supt. Delaine Eastin, now an education professor at Mills College in Oakland, 'Once you've seen the research, the evidence of what preschool can do for children, it becomes almost obscene not to call for universal preschool.' In study after study, the earliest dating back decades, researchers have demonstrated that children who attend preschool are more likely to graduate from high school than those who don't. Preschool boosts children's performance on I.Q. achievement tests, increases their earning power and decreases the chances they will get in trouble with the law."]

[Request #S4484]

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The State of Preschool: 2004 State Preschool Yearbook. By W. Steven Barnett and others, National Institute for Early Education Research (NIEER), Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey. (NIEER, New Brunswick, New Jersey). 2004.

["While parents strive to guide children’s growth and development in the home, state and local governments bear primary responsibility for classroom-based education in the United States. Programs that serve young children operate under a variety of names and auspices, including the federal Head Start program as well as privately and publicly funded child care. State prekindergarten programs will play an increasingly important role as part of this larger array of programs. The Yearbook seeks to improve knowledge and understanding of state efforts to expand the availability of high-quality education to young children in the 21st century." Pew Charitable Trusts E-Alert (November 22, 2004).]

Full Report. 228 p.:
http://nieer.org/yearbook/pdf/yearbook.pdf

Interactive Data Sets. Various pagings.:
http://nieer.org/yearbook/compare/

[Request #S4485]

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The High/Scope Perry Preschool Study Through Age 40: Summary, Conclusions, and Frequently Asked Questions. By Lawrence J. Schweinhart, High/Scope Educational Research Foundation. (The Foundation, Ypsilanti, Michigan) November 2004. 21 p.

Full Text at: www.highscope.org/Research/PerryProject/PerryAge40SumWeb.pdf

["This study examines the lives of 123 African Americans born in poverty and at high risk of failing in school. From 1962–1967, at ages 3 and 4, the subjects were randomly divided into a program group who received a high-quality preschool program based on High/Scope's participatory learning approach and a comparison group who received no preschool program. In the study's most recent phase, 97% of the study participants still living were interviewed at age 40. Additional data were gathered from the subjects' school, social services, and arrest records. The study found that adults at age 40 who had the preschool program had higher earnings, were more likely to hold a job, had committed fewer crimes, and were more likely to have graduated from high school than adults who did not have preschool."]

[Request #S4486]

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HEALTH

ACCESS TO CARE

Setting the Agenda for Research on Cultural Competence in Health Care. By Julia Puebla Fortier and Dawn Bishop, Resources for Cross Cultural Health Care. (Office of Minority Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Rockville, Maryland) 2004. 229 p.

Full Text at: www.omhrc.gov/cultural/agendarptAll.pdf

["This report examines the evidence on the impact of cultural competence interventions on the delivery of health care and health outcomes. It explores what we know and what we need to know about culturally sensitive interventions (e.g., cultural competence education and training), language assistance (e.g., oral interpretation), and organizational supports for cultural competence (e.g., cultural competence self-assessments), and identifies opportunities for future research."]

[Request #S4487]

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CHILDREN

"The Antidepressant Dilemma." By Jonathan Mahler. IN: The New York Times Magazine (November 21, 2004) pp. 1-12. (online).

Full Text at: www.nytimes.com/2004/11/21/magazine/21TEENS.html?oref=login&pagewanted=print&position=

["This article examines the debate surrounding the use of antidepressants in children. In October, the FDA ordered pharmaceutical companies that manufacture antidepressants to add black box warnings to drug packaging, advising consumers that the drugs could cause suicidal thoughts and actions in people younger than 18 years old. FDA officials said that an analysis of 15 clinical trials -- some of which were not made public for years -- found that there is a "consistent link" between the use of any kind of antidepressant and suicidal tendencies in children." Today's California Healthline (November 22, 2004) 1.]

[Request #S4488]

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Aggressive Behaviour Outcomes for Young Children: Change in Parenting Environment Predicts Change in Behaviour. By Eleanor M. Thomas. (Statistics Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada) 2004. 40 p.

Full Text at: www.statcan.ca/english/research/89-599-MIE/89-599-MIE2004001.pdf

["This study observed 2000 children between ages 2-4 and then studied again at ages 8-9. The study found that having parents who said they often used physical punishment or yelled at the child correlated with having a 39% higher score of bullying and other aggressiveness at age 2-4. By age 8-9 this correlated with 89% higher aggressiveness scores. The author noted that occasional physical or verbal reprimand was not considered a punitive environment but that extremes of such parenting style did seem linked to developing aggressiveness in children as well." ExchangeEveryDay (November 5, 2004) 1.]

[Request #S4489]

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HEALTH INSURANCE

"Covering Kids: Variation in Health Insurance Coverage Trends by State, 1996-2002." By Lynn A. Blewett and others. IN: Health Affairs, vol. 23, issue 6 (November/December 2004) pp. 170-180.

Full Text at: content.healthaffairs.org/cgi/reprint/23/6/170

["This study estimated state-specific changes in health insurance coverage rates for children between 1996–1998 and 2001–2002. It found considerable variation in the changing distribution of health insurance coverage for children across states, with significant increases in public program coverage in twenty-nine states and significant decreases in uninsured children in twenty-seven. This article provides an overview of state outreach and administrative simplification efforts and raise concerns about the persistent variation in children’s health insurance coverage across states."]

[Request #S4490]

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IMMIGRATION & IMMIGRANTS

"Who Is Sitting Across From Me? Immigrant Mothers' Knowledge of Parenting and Children's Development." By Marc H. Bornstein and Linda R. Cote. IN: Pediatrics, vol. 114, no. 5 (November 2004) pp. e557-e564.

Full Text at: pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/reprint/114/5/e557

["The authors note that while approximately one in five children in the United States lives with at least one parent who was born outside the United States, little is understood about parenting knowledge among immigrant families. The article examines mothers' substantive knowledge about child development and child rearing." MCH Alert (October 12, 2004) 1.]

[Request #S4491]

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HUMAN SERVICES

CHILDREN

Dialing for Help: State Telephone Hotlines as Vital Resources for Parents of Young Children. By Meg Booth and others, Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. (The Commonwealth Fund, New York, New York) November 2004. 12 p.

Full Text at: www.cmwf.org/usr_doc/787_Booth_dialing_for_help_issue_brief.pdf

["Toll-free telephone hotlines operated by the states are increasingly being used by families to obtain reliable advice on their young children’s health and well-being. Originally created for prenatal-care assistance alone, these lines now cover a wide range of early-childhood issues. But while the majority of the lines deliver high-quality information, promptly and empathetically, to their callers, there is still considerable room for improvement. For example, greater use could be made of experts in early-childhood services, and of knowledgeable parents, for speaking with callers and training other staff. The lines could also be made more easily accessible in several ways: through the national 800 number for childhood issues, via the more general 2-1-1 number for community-based services, and by means of a Web site for each line so that it could serve its audience at virtually any time of the day or night."]

[Request #S4492]

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EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT

Young Children Develop in an Environment of Relationships. By the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, a project of The Heller School for Social Policy and Management, Brandeis University, Waltham, Massachusetts. Working Paper. No. 1. (The Council, Waltham, Massachusetts) 2004. 9 p.

Full Text at: www.developingchild.net/papers/paper_1.pdf

["Healthy development depends on the quality and reliability of a young child’s relationships with important people within and outside the family. In the words of child development expert Urie Bronfenbrenner, 'Somebody’s got to be crazy about that kid.' The National Scientific Council on the Developing Child reviews the scientific findings underlying this point." Connect for Kids (November 1, 2004) 1.]

[Request #S4493]

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FAMILIES

Introduction to Family Strengthening. By the Family Strengthening Policy Center. Policy Brief. No. 1. (The Center, Washington, DC) October 2004. 12 p.

Full Text at: www.nassembly.org/fspc/practice/documents/final.pdf

["This paper seeks to describe a new way of thinking about families raising children in low-income communities and, importantly, how this new way of thinking can and should influence policy. The premise of 'family strengthening,' in this context is that children do well when cared for by supportive families, which, in turn, do better when they live in vital and supportive communities. This brief describe ways in which enhancing connections within families and between families and the institutions that affect them result in better outcomes for children and their families."]

[Request #S4494]

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STUDIES TO COME
[The following studies, reports, and documents have been ordered or requested, but have not yet arrived. Requests may be placed, and copies will be provided when the material arrives.]

EDUCATION

LITERACY

"Reaching for Success: A Close-Up of Mexican Immigrant Parents in the USA Who Foster Literacy Success for Their Kindergarten Children." By Cristina Gillanders, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. IN: Journal of Early Childhood Literacy, vol. 4, no. 3 (2004) pp. 243-269.

["The purpose of this study was to examine the home environment of immigrant Mexican kindergarteners of low socio-economic status in the USA who display high levels of emergent literacy when compared to their peers. To examine the home environments, the study focused on the literacy beliefs and practices of four families. Findings highlight the role of active parental support and corresponding literacy practices at home, as promoters of positive effects of bilingualism and consequently literacy learning. In addition, the school’s use of Spanish facilitated the dynamic of the families’ belief in active support of their children’s literacy learning and subsequent literacy practices."]

[Request #S4495]

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