Subject: Studies in the News 05-3 (February 8, 2005)


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Studies in the News for
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Children and Families Commission


Contents This Week

Introductory Material EDUCATION
   Evaluation of CARES programs
   Early childhood education economics
   State registries of early education workforce
   Economic impact of early care and education
   Evaluation of children's educational television
   Pathways to universal pre-k
   State Initiatives for School Readiness
HEALTH
   Secondhand smoke and children's intellectual development
   State Children's Health Insurance Program
   Food advertisements and children
HUMAN SERVICES
   Community among adults in child care
   Child care subsidies.
   Tiered strategies in child care
   State early childhood initiatives
STUDIES TO COME
   Staff caring for children with special needs
   Children with special health care needs
   Play and children's fitness
Introduction to Studies in the News

Studies in the News: Children and Family Supplement is a service provided to the First 5 California by the California State Library. The service features weekly lists of current articles focusing on Children and Family policy. Prior lists can be viewed from the California State Library's Web site at www.library.ca.gov/CRB/SITN/.

How to Obtain Materials Listed in SITN:

  • When available on the Internet, the URL for the full-text of each item is provided.

  • California State Employees may contact the State Information & Reference Center (916-654-0206; cslsirc@library.ca.gov) with the SITN issue number and the item number [S#].

  • All other interested individuals should contact their local library - the items may be available there, or may be borrowed by your local library on your behalf.

The following studies are currently on hand:

EDUCATION

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

Lessons from CARES and Other Early Care and Education Workforce Initiatives in California, 1999-2004: A Review of Evaluations Completed by Fall 2004. By Marcy Whitebook and Dan Bellm, Center for the Study of Child Care Employment, University of California, Berkeley. (The Center, Berkeley, California) 2004. 39 p.

Full Text at: www.iir.berkeley.edu/cscce/pdf/cares.pdf

["The professional development and reward model commonly known as CARES (Compensation and Recognition Encourage Stability) emerged in California as a way to promote a better-educated and better-compensated ECE workforce, and to motivate practitioners to stay in the field. This paper offers an overview of recent evaluations of CARES programs, discussing findings, lessons learned and possible directions for the future."]

[Request #S4763]

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An Economic Analysis of Investments in Early Childhood Education in Massachusetts. By Clive R. Belfield, Columbia University, and Patrick McEwan, Wellesley College. Prepared for Strategies for Children. Research Paper. (Strategies for Children, Boston, Massachusetts) October 2004. 46 p.

Full Text at: www.strategiesforchildren.org/images/pdfs/BelfieldMcEwanReport.pdf

["Significantly expanding access to pre-school in Massachusetts would cost more than half a billion dollars, but could generate new tax revenue for the state while saving hundreds of millions of dollars in existing spending on anti-crime, education and child welfare programs, according to a new report commissioned by early education advocates. The study ... says that by expanding two-year, state-funded pre-school to all 3-year-olds in Massachusetts, the state will recognize major savings in other areas of state spending, such as special education costs. For every $578 million the state spends, it will see an 18 percent return, or $102 million annually...." State House News Service (January 11, 2005) online.]

[Request #S4764]

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State Registries of the Early Care and Education Workforce: A Review of Current Models and Options for California. By Dan Bellm and Marcy Whitebook, Center for the Study of Child Care Employment. (The Center, Berkeley, California) 2004. 9 p.

Full Text at: www.iir.berkeley.edu/cscce/pdf/registries.pdf

["The term 'registry' has become a catchall phrase for various vehicles that states are using to build more coherent professional development systems for the ECE field. This policy brief presents the results of a recent nationwide survey of ECE workforce registries, brief profiles of registries in nine states, and an analysis of the registry-type functions that California already has in place."]

[Request #S4765]

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PRESCHOOL

The New Economics of Preschool: New Findings, Methods and Strategies for Increasing Economic Investments in Early Care and Education. By Dana E. Friedman. Prepared for the Early Childhood Funders' Collaborative. (The Collaborative, Various locations) October 2004. 19 p.

Full Text at: www.earlychildhoodfinance.org/handouts/FriedmanArticle.doc

["This paper provides an overview of research on both the long- and short-term economic impact of early care and education. Friedman reviews research on the long-term economic benefits that accrue from early childhood education. She also highlights research on short-term economic returns that result from the child care industry as a whole as well as increased and stable parental employment. She argues that both approaches are important and ends with practical applications and next steps." Smart Start: National Technical Assistance Center (December 7, 2004).]

[Request #S4766]

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SCHOOL READINESS

Using Television as a Teaching Tool: The Impacts of Ready to Learn Workshops on Parents, Educators, and the Children in their Care. By Kimberly Boller and others. Prepared for Public Broadcasting System. (Mathematica Policy Research, Princeton, New Jersey) June 2004. 186 p.

Full Text at: www.pbs.org/readytolearn/research/mpr_report.pdf

["The PBS Ready To Learn Television Service supports the development of children's educational television programs and online resources, and annually provides more than 9,000 workshops for 160,000 parents and early childhood educators. This impact report from our five-year evaluation reviews the content and quality of 85 observed workshops and the characteristics of parents and educators in the study. It also examines the impacts of attending a workshop on parents, educators, and children in their care. Researchers found that a few outcomes were affected by workshop participation--PBS co-viewing during the follow-up periods, Learning Triangle behaviors (for example, viewing a television program, reading a related book, and doing a related activity with children), and visiting PBS websites. Overall, reported impacts were modest, and impacts on adult behaviors did not translate into impacts on children of parents in the study."]

[Request #S4767]

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Strategic Pathways Toward Statewide Universal Pre-Kindergarten and Full-Day Kindergarten in Washington State. By John Burbank, Economic Opportunity Institute. (The Institute, Seattle, Washington) July 2004. 26 p.

Full Text at: www.ffcd.org/uploadDocs/WAStrategyforUPKFDK1.pdf

["This brief reviews promising models in Washington state for achieving universal prekindergarten with high standards and professional compensation for teachers. We develop pathways for universalizing best practices for UPK. We present a continuum of education and care for children from infancy through kindergarten and a parallel continuum of professional development for their teachers and caregivers. Finally, we lay out possible routes for securing the public funding to make UPK a reality."]

[Request #S4775]

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A Governor’s Guide to School Readiness: Building the Foundation for Bright Futures. By Anna Lovejoy, National Governors Association Center for Best Practices. (The Association, Washington, DC) January 2005. 44 p.

Full Text at: www.nga.org/cda/files/0501GOVGUIDEREADINESS.pdf

["This report is a product of the National Governors Association's Task Force on School Readiness. 'This governor's guide ties the state policy recommendations of the task force to concrete examples of state initiatives to promote school readiness. It includes key considerations for state policymakers and resources to help inform their decisions. The guide follows the same readiness framework as the task force report, presenting what states are doing to build Ready States and to support Ready Schools, Ready Communities, Ready Families, and Ready Children.'"]

[Request #S4776]

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HEALTH

CHILDREN

"Exposure to Environmental Tobacco Smoke and Cognitive Abilities among U.S. Children and Adolescents." By Kimberly Yolton, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, and others. IN: Environmental Health Perspectives, vol. 113, no. 1 (January 2005) pp. 98-103.

Full Text at:

[Daniel E. McGoldrick, from the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, states that this new study demonstrates a strong negative relationship between children's exposure to secondhand smoke and their performance on tests measuring reading, math and reasoning skills. The negative impact of secondhand smoke on children's cognitive ability was evident even at extremely low levels of exposure and held up when other possible explanations (e.g., poverty, parent education, etc.) were controlled." U.S. Newswire (January 4, 2005) online.]

[Request #S4768]

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"SCHIP's Impact In Three States: How Do The Most Vulnerable Children Fare?" By Andrew W. Dick, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, and others. IN: Health Affairs, vol. 23, no. 5 (September/October 2004) pp. 63-75.

["Does SCHIP benefit all children? A study of SCHIP (State Children's Health Insurance Program) found that among all new SCHIP enrollees, more children had a regular place to get care and had fewer unmet health needs and families were more satisfied with the health care their children received after SCHIP enrollment than before. The study also found, however, that in spite of significant gains from SCHIP, disparities in health care access and satisfaction remained for some vulnerable groups of enrollees." Health and Healthcare in the Schools (January 2005) online.]

[Request #S4769]

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Guidelines for Responsible Food Marketing to Children. By Center for Science in the Public Interest. (The Center, Washington, DC) January 2005. 10 p.

Full Text at: cspinet.org/marketingguidelines.pdf

["These guidelines call on food manufacturers, broadcasters, restaurants, movie studios, and schools to reform the way drinks, snacks, fast-food meals, and other foods are marketed to kids. The Guidelines propose curbing certain marketing techniques but unlike the food industry's self-imposed guidelines, CSPI is proposing basic nutritional thresholds for determining which foods should be marketed to kids in the first place. The Guidelines were developed with input from experts from academia, government, and industry." CSPI Newsroom (January 5, 2005) online.]

[Request #S4778]

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HUMAN SERVICES

CHILD CARE

Relationships, the Heart of Quality Care: Creating Community Among Adults in Early Care Settings. By Amy C. Baker and Lynn A. Manfredi-Petitt. (National Association for the Education of Young Children, Washington, DC) 2004. 186 p.

["When adult connections are caring and strong, parents, caregivers, and directors are empowered to work together to help children thrive. This book, based on extensive observations and interviews in child care settings around the country, challenges a number of assumptions and practices commonplace in center care and makes a strong case for relationship-based child care. The authors detail the understandings and attitudes that support such care, as well as the strategies and policies necessary to bring it about." NOTE: Relationships, the Heart of Quality Care ... is available for 3-day loan.]

[Request #S4770]

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National Estimates of Child Care and Subsidy Receipt for Children Ages 0 to 6: What Can We Learn from the National Household Education Survey? By Akemi Kinukawa, Child Trends, and others. Child Trends Research Brief. Prepared for the Child Care Bureau of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. (Child Trends, Washington DC) October 2004. 20 p.

Full Text at: www.childtrends.org/Files/NHES_Research_brief_10_19_04.pdf

["This research brief highlights findings from analyses of the 2001 Early Childhood Program Participation Study of the National Household Education Survey Program (NHES). It provides national survey-based estimates of child care arrangements and subsidy receipt for children ages 0 to 6 (not yet in kindergarten), examining variations in the use of non-parental care and arrangement types by household income and subsidy receipt."]

[Request #S4771]

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Incentives for Quality: Tiered Strategies in Child Care. By Beth Clemens and others. National Conference of State Legislatures. (NCSL, Washington, DC) September 2004. 11 p.

["A tiered strategy system – whether it includes tiered reimbursement, a quality rating system, a rated licensing system, or a combination of these – can be an important part of a state’s efforts to improve child care quality. The majority of states currently have a tiered system in place, and other states are considering implementation of a tiered system to improve child care quality…. As states further develop tiered systems and evaluation date is collected and assessed, policymakers will have an added opportunity to consider new ideas and research to make decisions about the quality approaches that fit best in their states."]

[Request #S4772]

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CHILDREN

Up and Running: A Compendium of Multi-Site Early Childhood Initiatives. By Sheri Floyd and others. (State Early Childhood Policy Technical Assistance Network, Des Moines, Iowa) July 2004. 28 p.

Full Text at: www.finebynine.org/pdf/SECPTAN_Multisite_10_04.pdf

["Currently, every state in the country has at least one nationally supported initiative designed to improve the well-being of the nation¹s youngest children. Up and Running provides brief descriptions and contact information for twenty-seven currently operating and four completed early childhood initiatives. These are grouped into: (1) comprehensive school readiness initiatives, (2) early care and education initiatives, (3) child health and physical well-being initiatives, (4) family well-being and self-sufficiency initiatives, (5) multi-state program replication efforts, and (6) completed initiatives. All have resources available to inform practitioners and policy makers. The compendium also provides a state-by-state overview chart or 'cross-walk.'"]

[Request #S4773]

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STUDIES TO COME
[The following studies, reports, and documents have been ordered or requested, but have not yet arrived. Requests may be placed, and copies will be provided when the material arrives.]

HEALTH

"Caring for Children with Complex Needs: Staff Education and Training." By Jaqui Hewitt-Taylor, Institute of Health and Community Studies, Bournemouth University, United Kingdom. IN: Journal of Child Health Care, vol. 9, no. 1 (2005) pp. 72-86.

["Children who live with medical conditions that were previously considered incompatible with long term survival are often highly dependent on interventions and equipment which would traditionally have required hospitalization. However, it is generally accepted that their social, psychological, emotional and developmental needs are best met at home. One of the many factors that can impede these children from being discharged from hospital is the lack of availability of staff who can provide care and support for them and their families. Increasing the number of staff who are able to provide such support might, therefore, assist in providing for their care needs. This article reports on a study of the perceived education and training needs of staff who care for children with complex needs and their families."]

[Request #S4774]

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"Delayed or Forgone Care Among Children with Special Health Care Needs: An Analysis of the 2001 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs." By Zhihuan J. Huang and others. IN: Ambulatory Pediatrics, vol. 5, no. 1 (January/February 2005) pp. 60-67.

["Studies have shown that CSHCN are more likely to have at least one unmet need, to be unable to obtain needed health care, and to delay obtaining health care because of cost. However, no study has examined the reasons other than cost for delayed or forgone care among CSHCN. The article describes the sociodemographic characteristics of CSHCN who had delayed or forgone care and explores reasons for delayed or forgone care and their associations with other factors. The authors conclude that the study "provides insights and references for clinicians and health policy makers on how to reduce the disparities of health and health access in the population." MCH Alert (January 28, 2005).]

[Request #S4777]

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EXERCISE

"Resurrecting Free Play in Young Children: Looking Beyond Fitness and Fatness to Attention, Affiliation, and Affect." By Hillary L. Burdette, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, and Robert C. Whitaker, Mathematica Policy Research. IN: Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, vol. 159, no. 1 (January 2005) pp. 46-50.

["The current emphasis on increasing physical activity in young children has arisen in response to the childhood obesity epidemic. The authors suggest that efforts to increase physical activity in young children might be more successful if we emphasize other outcomes, besides obesity, and use different language. Specifically, they suggest using the word 'play' rather than 'physical activity' or 'exercise,' and emphasizing the benefits of play for children's social, emotional, and cognitive development. Play is about more than improving fitness and reducing fatness." News from Mathematica (January 25, 2005).]

[Request #S4779]

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