Subject: Studies in the News 05-21 (July 25, 2005)


CALIFORNIA RESEARCH BUREAU
CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY
Studies in the News


California -- One Hundred and Fifty Years Ago

July 1855 - "For reasons not known, Captain Joseph Libbey Folsom died suddenly on July 19, 1855 while visiting friends at Mission San Jose (now Fremont.) Folsom was a 38-year-old bachelor when he died. Folsom (had just begun) to pursue his dream of developing his 35,500 acres along the American River, Rancho Rio de los Americanos. In 1854, he chose a townsite near the river, which he named Granite City. Folsom then hired Theodore Judah to survey and lay out the town in 1855. The original streets still bear the names of Folsom's family, friends and people from California's history. Executors of his estate renamed "Granite City"in his honor. By January, 1856, every lot had been sold and "Folsom" was home to three new hotels. http://www.sierrafoothillmagazine.com/folsomj.html "    

July 1855 - "Mrs. Anna Spark sold her inheritance, which included land in San Francisco and the 35,500 acre Rancho Rio de los Americanos near Sacramento, to Captain Folsom for the sum of $75,000. She, was a Danish West Indies native woman who did not understand the value of her late son's California holdings. Although increasing land values in California did make Folsom a millionaire, he was forced to constantly borrow money in order to fend off legal challenges to his purchase of her estate. There was also a huge problem with squatters trying to take over Folsom's holdings in San Francisco, so he had to hire his own security guards to protect the land. Folsom ended up borrowing on short-term, high interest notes. Even though records indicate he was deeply in debt, he built an elaborate cottage residence in San Francisco. http://www.sierrafoothillmagazine.com/folsomj.html"    

Contents This Week

Introductory Material CALIFORNIA READER
   California's growth and financial future
   Statistics for Los Angeles
   San Joaquin Valley and government spending
CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT
   Arrests up for Methamphetamines
   Incarcerated criminal aliens
   Police shielded for failing to enforce order
   Parole system failing
   Court upholds state sentencing law
ECONOMY
   Greater safety requirement for thrill rides
   Court overturns part of state financial privacy law
   Base closures and realignments
   California's past base closure experiences
   Investment in information technology
   Decision against file sharing company
   Cable networks don't have to share
EDUCATION
   Student performance in reading and mathematics
   Newcomers from over 90 countries
   Identification and redesignation of English Learners
   Inflated graduation rates
   State education rankings and statistics
   Annual report of education statistics
   Autism's growing cost to schools
ENERGY
   Reorganizing energy agency
   Cutting national oil use in half
ENVIRONMENT & NATURAL RESOURCES
   Coastal Commission constitutionality upheld
   Environmental pollution in umbilical cord blood
   Court allows wide use of eminent domain
GENERAL GOVERNMENT
   Displaying the Ten Commandments
   Uncompetitive elections and the political system
   Maintaining accurate voter registration lists
   Federal appropriation update
   Redistricting reform
   Question on legality of multistate lottery
   Land trusts
HEALTH
   Budget crisis and medicaid
   Government funding for health care
   Medicaid's new payment system
   Medi-Cal expenditures and long-term forecasts
   Mental health care needs of youth in foster care
   States react slowly to obesity crisis
   Overpaying for prescription drugs and Medicaid
HOUSING
   Affordable housing bond falls short
HUMAN SERVICES
   Well-being for children in foster care
   Improving foster youth outcomes
   Millions of Californians now food insecure
STUDIES TO COME
   Urban school reform
   Neighborbood associations and local government
   Delay of mental health treatment
Introduction to Studies in the News

Studies in the News is a very current compilation of items significant to the Legislature and Governor's Office. It is created weekly by the State Library's Research Bureau to supplement the public policy debate in California’s Capitol. To help share the latest information with state policymakers, these reading lists are now being made accessible through the State Library’s website. This week's list of current articles in various public policy areas is presented below.

Service to State Employees:

  • When available, the URL for the full text of each item is provided.

  • California State Employees may contact the State Information & Reference Center (916-654-0206; cslsirc@library.ca.gov) with the SITN issue number and the item number [S#].

  • All other interested individuals should contact their local library - the items may be available there, or may be borrowed by your local library on your behalf.

The following studies are currently on hand:

CALIFORNIA READER

Getting to 2025: Can California Meet the Challenges? By Ellen Hanak and Mark Baldrassare. Public Policy Institute of California. (The Institute, San Francisco, California) June 2005. 4 p.

Full Text at: www.ppic.org/content/pubs/RB_605MBRB.pdf

["A multidisciplinary research study [was done that] considers whether the state is facing a growth and infrastructure crisis, the dimensions of the potential problem, and how best to think about planning for the future."]

[Request #S52101]

Return to the Table of Contents

L.A. Stats. By the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corporation. (The Corporation, Los Angeles, California) June 2005. 45 p.

Full Text at: laedc.info/pdf/LAStats-2005.pdf

["Frequently requested statistics for Los Angeles and surrounding counties on demographics, employment, income, economic base, real estate, retailing, and more. This year, we added San Diego data to most of the tables."]

[Request #S52102]

Return to the Table of Contents

Preliminary Data on Federal Direct Expenditures and Possible Policy Issues Relating to the San Joaquin Valley. By Congressional Research Service. (The Service, Washington, DC) 2005. Various pagings.

Full Text at: www.nunes.house.gov/documents/Preliminary_CRS_Report.doc

["This memorandum provides some preliminary results from a forthcoming CRS study of California's San Joaquin Valley and its counties: Fresno, Kern, Kings, Madera, Merced, San Joaquin, Stanislaus, and Tulare. The report will document the role of direct federal expenditures and obligations to the counties of the San Joaquin Valley and assesses the basis of current socioeconomic, environmental, agricultural, and transportation concerns in the Valley."]

[Request #S52103]

Return to the Table of Contents

CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT

DRUGS

Meth Epidemic in America. By National Association of Counties. (The Association, Washington, DC) July 5, 2005. 11 p.

Full Text at: www.naco.org/Content/ContentGroups/Publications1/Surveys1/Special_Surveys/MethSurveys.pdf

["Law enforcement officials in 58 percent of the counties surveyed labeled meth as their biggest drug challenge, surpassing heroin and cocaine. By contrast officials identified cocaine as a major problem in 19 percent of the counties and marijuana as the major problem in 17 percent of the counties surveyed. Eighty-seven percent of the counties surveyed found an increase in the number of meth-related arrests starting three years ago." Sacramento Bee (July 6, 2005) A3.]

[Request #S52104]

Return to the Table of Contents

IMMIGRATION

Information on Certain Illegal Aliens Arrested in the United States. AND Information on Criminal Aliens Incarcerated in Federal and State Prisons and Local Jails. By the U.S. Government Accountability Office. GAO-05-646R and GAO-05-337R. (The Office, Washington, DC) 2005.

["Despite the soaring cost of incarcerating criminal aliens nationwide, the federal government has reduced its reimbursements to state and local governments, two new reports by the U.S. Government Accountability Office found." Los Angeles Daily News (June 15, 2005) 1.]

Arrested in the United States. GAO-05-646R . 31 p.:
http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d05646r.pdf

Incarcerated in Federal and State Prisons and Local Jails. GAO-05-337R. 38 p.:
http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d05337r.pdf

[Request #S52105]

Return to the Table of Contents

POLICE

Town of Castle Rock, Colorado v. Gonzales, individually and as next best friend of her minor children, Gonzales, et al. U.S. Supreme Court. 04-278. June 27, 2005. Various pagings.

Full Text at: www.supremecourtus.gov/opinions/04pdf/04-278.pdf

["The court ruled that police departments can't be sued for failing to enforce restraining orders, a decision hailed by local governments but decried by organizations trying to protect victims of domestic violence... Jessica Gonzales had sued asserting that the Police Department's 'official policy or custom of failing to respond properly to complaints of restraining order violations' had violated her rights under the Constitution's due process clause... In the majority opinion, Scalia said the ruling 'does not mean states are powerless to provide victims with personally enforceable remedies... The people of Colorado are free to craft such a system under state law.'"]

[Request #S52106]

Return to the Table of Contents

PRISONERS & PAROLEES

"Parole System Failing: Killings Illustrate Breakdown." By Troy Anderson. IN: Los Angeles Daily News (July 5, 2005) N1.

["Los Angeles Police Department authorities say Kenrick William Johnson, an at-large parolee with a 16-year criminal history, fatally shot Officer Ricardo Lizarraga in February 2004..... In late June, Jose Orozco -- a career criminal who was out on parole but had not reported to his parole agent since early this year -- was arrested in the slaying of sheriff's Deputy Jerry Ortiz.... Two other men were parolees-at-large from Los Angeles County when they became suspects in crimes that put them on the state's 10 Most Wanted List.... More than 7,000 felons have failed to report to their parole agents in Los Angeles County and are considered 'at large' with warrants issued for their arrest.... Analysts say the figures highlight a system in dire need of funding and reform."]

[Request #S52107]

Return to the Table of Contents

SENTENCING

People v. Kevin Michael Black. California Supreme Court. S126182. June 20, 2005. Various pagings.

Full Text at: www.courtinfo.ca.gov/opinions/documents/S126182.PDF

["California judges can add years to prison terms based on findings that were never submitted to a jury the court said in a ruling upholding the state's sentencing system... Similar laws in many states, including California, were called into question last year when the U.S. Supreme Court struck down a Washington state law because it allowed the trial judge to raise the sentence above the range prescribed by the jury verdict, based on the judge's findings about the crime or the criminal... But the California Supreme Court said that the [California] law differed from those that have been struck down." San Francisco Chronicle (June 21, 2005) 1.]

[Request #S52108]

Return to the Table of Contents

ECONOMY

AMUSEMENT PARKS

Johana Gomez v. Superior Court of Los Angeles County. California Supreme Court. S118489. June 16, 2005. Various pagings

Full Text at: www.courtinfo.ca.gov/opinions/documents/S118489.PDF

["The 4-3 decision, which found that thrill rides could be classified as 'common carriers,' said operators must use 'the utmost care and diligence' for the safety of riders rather than mere 'reasonable care.' Most states require operators of amusement rides to use only 'reasonable care,' industry lawyers said... The ruling is expected to make it easier for people injured on rides to prevail in lawsuits against amusement parks." Los Angeles Times (June 17, 2005) 1.]

[Request #S52109]

Return to the Table of Contents

BANK & THRIFT REGULATION

American Bankers Association, et al. v. Bill Lockyer, et al. U.S. Court of Appeals, Ninth District. 04-16334. June 20, 2005. 13 p.

Full Text at: www.ca9.uscourts.gov/ca9/newopinions.nsf/E21717B0B7CEFBDA882570260052FCD7/$file/0416334.pdf?openelement

["California's year-old financial privacy law, which allows consumers to stop banks from sharing personal information with affiliated companies, was partially overturned by a federal appeals court Monday in a ruling that left the boundaries of the surviving law unclear... The court ruled that the state law conflicts with a federal law that allows financial institutions to share certain information with their affiliates without asking their customers. But the court said the scope of the federal law was limited to information that was collected to determine the customer's eligibility for credit, insurance or employment." San Francisco Chronicle (June 21, 2005) 1.]

[Request #S52110]

Return to the Table of Contents

DEFENSE CUTS & MILITARY BASE CLOSURES

Military Bases: Analysis of DOD's 2005 Selection Process and Recommendations for Base Closures and Realignments. By U.S. Government Accountability Office. GAO-05-785. (The Office, Washington, DC) July 2005. 273 p.

Full Text at: www.gao.gov/cgi-bin/getrpt?GAO-05-785

["GAO objectives were to: 1) determine the extent to which DOD's proposals achieved its stated BRAC goals; 2) analyze whether the process for developing recommendations was logical and reasoned; and 3) identify issues with the recommendations that may warrant further attention."]

[Request #S52111]

Return to the Table of Contents

California Institute Special Report: California's Past Base Closure Experiences and the 2005 BRAC Round. By Michael Freedman and Tim Ransdell. California Institute for Federal Policy Research. (The Institute, Washington, DC) April 2005. 23 p.

Full Text at: www.calinst.org/defense/base1a.pdf

["By mid May, the Department of Defense will announce which military bases it thinks should be closed. Expected to dwarf prior closure cycles, the 2005 BRAC round comes 10 years after a series of closures that targeted California for far more cuts than other states. Despite these past reductions, the military in California remains a significant economic force, and the state's base communities are girding for a potentially difficult year."]

[Request #S52112]

Return to the Table of Contents

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

“IT Investment: Will the Glory Days Ever Return.” By Mark Doms. IN: FRBSF Economic Letter, no. 2005-13 (June 17, 2005) pp. 1-4.

[“Technological progress in the IT area will likely continue to lower the prices of IT goods, which in turn helps boost IT spending. However, as the IT industry has matured, the response of business spending on IT goods for a given change in prices may have become more muted recently, suggesting that normal spending on IT goods may not increase as quickly as it did in the late 1990s. Consequently, real spending may also grow at historically modest rates, though strong relative to other investment goods whose prices do not fall as fast.”]

[Request #S52113]

Return to the Table of Contents

MEDIA INDUSTRY

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Inc., et al. v. Grokster, LTD., et al. U.S. Supreme Court. 04-480. June 27, 2005. Various pagings.

Full Text at: www.supremecourtus.gov/opinions/04pdf/04-480.pdf

["The Supreme Court imposed a new test for technological innovation, finding that Internet file-sharing services can be sued if they encourage people to use the powerful technology to steal music or movies. But the court's unanimous decision specifically did not eliminate protections afforded technology companies so long as their products have 'substantial' legitimate uses and there is no intent to promote illegal activity." San Jose Mercury News (June 28, 2005) 1.]

[Request #S52114]

Return to the Table of Contents

TELECOMMUNICATIONS INDUSTRY

National Cable & Telecommunications Association, et al. v. Brand X Internet Services, et al. U.S. Supreme Court. 04-277. June 27, 2005. Various pagings.

Full Text at: www.supremecourtus.gov/opinions/04pdf/04-277.pdf

["The Supreme Court ruled that cable companies do not have to share their networks with competitors that might offer high-speed Internet access at lower rates. The ruling was a defeat for Internet service providers that piggyback on the phone company's network and had hoped to do the same on cable's." Monterey County Herald (June 28, 2005) B1.]

[Request #S52115]

Return to the Table of Contents

EDUCATION

ASSESSMENT

NAEP 2004 Trends in Academic Progress: Three Decades of Student Performance in Reading and Mathematics. By Marlanne Perle, Educational Testing Service, and others. Prepared for the National Center for Education Statistics. (The Center, Washington, DC) 2005. 148 p.

Full Text at: nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/pdf/main2005/2005464.pdf

["Scores rose in both math and reading at each age level for all students except 17-year-olds in reading. That score has remained virtually flat since 1973. And, in what appears to be the first evidence of a significant narrowing of the achievement gap between whites and nonwhites, black and Latino students in each age group were reading and calculating better in 2004 than when first tested in the early 1970s." San Francisco Chronicle (July 15, 2005) 1.]

[Request #S52116]

Return to the Table of Contents

BILINGUAL EDUCATION

The Idaho State Board of Education's Limited English Proficiency (LEP) Subcommittee: Final Report and Recommendations. By the Limited English Proficiency Subcommittee. (Idaho State Board of Education, Boise, Idaho) June 2005. 21 pgs.

Full Text at: www.idahoboardofed.org/documents/LEP_SubCmteFinalRptandRec5-05.pdf

["Even though 80 percent of the LEP students are Hispanic, students ... come from more than 90 countries... The lack of English proficiency ... has produced an achievement gap between many of these newcomers and their classmates.... Programming for LEP students can no longer be separated from the general education. LEP students must learn Reading, Math, Science, History, take P.E., etc., as they simultaneously learn English. Because of this, LEP services must be integrated into all classes. Many programs, assessments and interventions do not take into consideration the special needs of English language learners, leading to one reason why these students are being left behind." Times-News (June 29, 2005) 1.]

[Request #S52117]

Return to the Table of Contents

Department of Education: School Districts' Inconsistent Identification and Redesignation of English Learners Cause Funding Variances and Make Comparisons of Performance Outcomes Difficult. By California State Auditor, California Bureau of State Audits. (The Bureau, Sacramento, California) June 2005. 107 p.

Full Text at: www.bsa.ca.gov/pdfs/reports/2004-120.pdf

["This report concludes that the department is charged with distributing program funds for three main programs that address the needs of public school students who are not yet fluent in English. The department, however, provides leeway to school districts in establishing certain criteria they use both to identify students as English learners and to redesignate them as fluent in English. Significant differences exist in the stringency of school districts' criteria causing funding variances and lack of comparability in performance results across the State."]

[Request #S52118]

Return to the Table of Contents

DROPOUT RATES

Getting Honest About Grad Rates: How States Play the Numbers and Students Lose. By Daria Hall, The Education Trust. (The Trust, Washington, DC) June 2005. 15 p.

Full Text at: www2.edtrust.org/NR/rdonlyres/C5A6974D-6C04-4FB1-A9FC-05938CB0744D/0/GettingHonest.pdf

["The report by The Education Trust, a national nonprofit organization whose mission is to raise student achievement, criticized the methods used by states to calculate and report graduation rates, saying they lead to 'inaccurate' and 'unreliable' statistics."]

[Request #S52119]

Return to the Table of Contents

EDUCATIONAL STATISTICS

Rankings and Estimates: Rankings of the States 2004 and Estimates of School Statistics 2005. By National Education Association Research. (The Association, Washington, DC) June 2005. 129 p.

Full Text at: www.nea.org/edstats/images/05rankings.pdf

["The quality of a child's teacher is a key factor in closing achievement gaps and helping all students succeed in work and life -- but too often, American teachers are underpaid and under-resourced. A new study finds that despite chronic teacher shortages in schools across the country, teacher salary levels have remained flat, growing just 2.9 percent in inflation-adjusted dollars." Connect for Kids (June 27, 2005) 1.]

[Request #S52120]

Return to the Table of Contents

The Condition of Education 2005. By John Wirt, National Center for Education Statistics, U.S. Department of Education, and others. NCES 2005–094. (The Center, Washington, DC) June 2005.

Full Text at:

["The Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics has released its annual report on the progress of American education. Reading tests showed mixed results: between 1992 and 2003, eighth-graders improved, but fourth-graders’ performance did not change. Math achievement rose steadily between both groups during this time. The high school dropout rate declined from 1972 to 2002 -- but has remained fairly stable over the last decade. A special analysis also describes the teacher workforce and the movement of teachers into and out of teaching." Connect for Kids (June 6, 2005) online.]

Full Report. 383 p.:
http://nces.ed.gov/pubs2005/2005094.pdf

In Brief. 25 p.:
http://nces.ed.gov/pubs2005/2005095.pdf

[Request #S52121]

Return to the Table of Contents

SPECIAL EDUCATION

Special Education Services for Autistic Children in San Mateo County: Grand Jury Report. The Superior Court of California, County of San Mateo. (The Court, San Mateo, California.) June 2005. 8 p.

Full Text at: www.sanmateocourt.org/grandjury/2004/reports/Autism_vers31_final.pdf

["A report was released praising the county's programs for autistic students, but warning that increasing numbers of autistic children and the high cost of their education was a significant drain on school districts. The number of autistic children in the county has doubled since 2000 to more than 500, an increase that mirrors a statewide trend." San Jose Mercury News (July 1, 2005) 1.]

[Request #S52122]

Return to the Table of Contents

ENERGY

ENERGY

Letter to the Governor and the Legislature Regarding the Governor's Reorganization Plan to Create a Department of Energy. By Little Hoover Commission. (The Commission, Sacramento, California) June 23, 2005. 2 p.

Full Text at: www.lhc.ca.gov/lhcdir/report182.pdf

["The Little Hoover Commission recommended that the Legislature reject Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's energy agency reorganization plan. On a 7-1 vote, the state government watchdog group instead encouraged the administration to resubmit a plan that would address legal concerns raised by both the state attorney general's office and the Legislative Counsel's Office. Those two agencies concluded that the governor's plan would transfer regulatory functions from the Public Utilities Commission to the Energy Commission." Sacramento Bee (June 24, 2005)1.]

[Request #S52123]

Return to the Table of Contents

PETROLEUM

Winning the Oil Endgame: Innovation for Profits, Jobs, and Security. By Amory B. Lovins, and others, Rocky Mountain Institute. (The Institute, Snowmass, Colorado) March 2005.

["The Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI), in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Defense, has released a report that suggests a roadmap for getting the United States 'completely, attractively, and profitably off oil.' According to RMI, the report outlines how American industry can restore competitiveness and boost profits by mobilizing modern technologies and smart business strategies to displace oil more cheaply than buying it." TRB Newsletter (June 15, 2005) 1.]

Report. 305 p.
http://www.oilendgame.com/pdfs/WtOEg_72dpi.pdf

Executive Summary. 6 p.
http://www.oilendgame.com/pdfs/WtOEg_ExecSummary.pdf

[Request #S52124]

Return to the Table of Contents

ENVIRONMENT & NATURAL RESOURCES

COASTAL AREAS

Marine Forests Society et al. v. California Coastal Commission et al. California Supreme Court. S113466. June 23, 2005. Various pagings.

Full Text at: www.courtinfo.ca.gov/opinions/documents/S113466.PDF

["The court removed a legal cloud that had threatened to wipe out 30 years of restrictions on coastal development, ruling unanimously that the makeup of the state Coastal Commission meets constitutional requirements....The court agreed that the previous appointment process raised a 'serious' constitutional question because the Legislature could replace appointees at will, opening the commission to political meddling. But the court decided that the Legislature's subsequent actions, creating fixed terms for its appointees, had solved the problem." Los Angeles Times (June 24, 2005) 1.]

[Request #S52125]

Return to the Table of Contents

POLLUTION

Body Burden: The Pollution in Newborns. By Jane Houlihan, and others, Environmental Working Group. (The Group, Washington, DC) July 14, 2005.

["Not long ago scientists thought that the placenta shielded cord blood — and the developing baby — from most chemicals and pollutants in the environment. But now we know that at this critical time when organs, vessels, membranes and systems are knit together from single cells to finished form in a span of weeks, the umbilical cord carries not only the building blocks of life, but also a steady stream of industrial chemicals, pollutants and pesticides that cross the placenta as readily as residues from cigarettes and alcohol. This is the human 'body burden' — the pollution in people that permeates everyone in the world, including babies in the womb."]

Report. 77 p.
http://www.ewg.org/reports_content/bodyburden2/pdf/bodyburden2_final.pdf

Executive Summary. 1 p.
http://www.ewg.org/reports/bodyburden2/execsumm.php

[Request #S52126]

Return to the Table of Contents

TAKINGS

Kelo, et al. v. City of New London, et al. U.S. Supreme Court. 04-108. June 23, 2005. Various pagings.

Full Text at: www.supremecourtus.gov/opinions/04pdf/04-108.pdf

["Local governments can condemn private property and convert it to more profitable private use, a sharply divided Supreme Court ruled.... Governments can seize private property for public purposes; for instance, to build a road. The Kelo case is different, involving the seizing of private property for other private purposes that also promise a public benefit." Sacramento Bee (June 24, 2005) 1.]

[Request #S52127]

Return to the Table of Contents

GENERAL GOVERNMENT

CHURCH & STATE

McCreary County Kentucky, et al. v. American Civil Liberties Union of Kentucky, et al. 03-1693. And Van Orden v. Perry, Governor of Texas, et al. 03-1500. U.S. Supreme Court. June 27, 2005.

["The court's split decisions narrowly preserved the rule that has governed church-state cases since 1947 -- that the government must stay neutral between religion and non-religion. But the court left few clues as to how the decisions would apply to future disputes over other religious displays or observances. The two 5-4 rulings allowed the commandments to remain part of a display of monuments on the grounds of the Texas statehouse but barred postings of the same biblical text in two Kentucky courthouses." San Francisco Chronicle (June 28, 2005) A1.]

McCreary. Various pagings.
http://www.supremecourtus.gov/opinions/04pdf/03-1693.pdf

Van Orden. Various pagings.
http://www.supremecourtus.gov/opinions/04pdf/03-1500.pdf

[Request #S52128]

Return to the Table of Contents

ELECTIONS

Uncompetitive Elections and the American Political System. By Patrick Basham and Dennis Polhill. CATO Institute. (The Institute, Washington, DC) June 30, 2005. 20 p.

Full Text at: www.cato.org/pubs/pas/pa547.pdf

["American representative government suffers from the handicap of a largely uncompetitive political system. American politics has fewer and fewer competitive elections. In arguing that political competition matters a great deal, this paper traces the increasing trend toward uncompetitiveness and details the role and nature of incumbency advantage in fostering an uncompetitive political system."]

[Request #S52129]

Return to the Table of Contents

Additional Data Could Help State and Local Elections Officials Maintain Accurate Voter Registration Lists. By U.S. Government Accountability Office. GAO-05-478. (The Office, Washington, DC) June 2005. 71 p.

Full Text at: www.gao.gov/new.items/d05478.pdf

["Reports of ineligible persons registering to vote raised concerns about state processes for verifying voter registration lists. This report discusses how states verify voter registration eligibility; the challenges they face in maintaining accurate voter lists; the progress toward implementing Help America Vote Act (HAVA) registration requirements; and identifies federal data sources that might be used to help verify voter registration eligibility."]

[Request #S52130]

Return to the Table of Contents

FEDERAL BUDGET

FY 2006 Appropriations Update: A Tale of Two Chambers. By Federal Funds Information for States, Budget Brief 05-08. (FFIS, Washington, DC) July 8, 2005. 7 p.

Full Text at: www.ffis.org/exec_sum/budget/bb05-08_s.htm

["The House has cleared its appropriations docket by passing all 13 of its appropriations bills. The Senate still has work to do, having passed appropriations bills for only Energy and Water, the Interior Department and the Legislative Branch... In addition to its appropriations work, Congress also passed temporary extensions for two major programs... Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program and the surface transportation program. Both are up for reauthorization, and the extensions allow additional time for Congress to work on legislation."]

[Request #S52131]

Return to the Table of Contents

REDISTRICTING

Redistricting Reform. By Ari Weisbard and Jeannie Wilkinson. (The Center for Governmental Studies, Los Angeles, California) 2005. 56 p.

Full Text at: www.cgs.org/publications/docs/DrawingLinesAPublicInterestGuidetoRedistrictingReform.pdf

["The following report provides information and analysis to aid Californians as they consider whether and how to change their process for drawing electoral district lines. It reviews the overarching goals of redistricting efforts and describes how the membership, structure and instructions given to an Independent Redistricting Commission can be crafted to help it achieve these goals. It also evaluates three main proposals for an Independent Redistricting Commission and discusses how their best features can be combined and improved to create a Commission that will be both fair and effective for California's voters."]

[Request #S52132]

Return to the Table of Contents

STATE LOTTERY

California State Lottery: Multistate Lottery, #0508651. By Diane F. Boyer-Vine and Lisa M. Plummer, California Legislative Counsel. (The Counsel, Sacramento, California) June 13, 2005. 12 p.

["California's much-heralded entrance into an 11-state lottery is illegal, the Legislative Counsel's Office said, a blow that could derail the approaching debut of the popular game... Although the opinion from lawmakers' attorneys is not binding, flouting its conclusion would invite lawsuits from competing gambling interests such as Indian casinos and card rooms, as well as anti-gambling forces." Los Angeles Daily News (June 15, 2005) 1.]

[Request #S52133]

Return to the Table of Contents

TRIBAL RELATIONS

Elouise Pepion Cobell, et al. v. Gale Norton, et al. United State District Court for the District of Columbia. 96-1285. July 12, 2005. 34 p.

Full Text at: www.dcd.uscourts.gov/opinions/2005/Lamberth/1996-CV-1285~10:18:31~7-12-2005-a.pdf

["U.S. Berated Over Indians' Treatment -- Judge Orders Interior Department to Send Written Warnings About Its Credibility: Judge Lamberth ruled that the government essentially has to tell Indian trust-account holders the information it sends them is not reliable. He also described in his opinion the history of the lawsuit as proof that the government continues to treat Indians 'as if they were somehow less than deserving of the respect that should be afforded to everyone in a society where all people are supposed to be equal.'" Washington Post (July 13, 2005) A19.]

[Request #S52134]

Return to the Table of Contents

HEALTH

HEALTH CARE

State of the States: Finding Alternative Routes. By Bonniew Austin and others, AcademyHealth. (AcademyHealth, Washington, DC) 2005. 40 p.

Full Text at: www.statecoverage.net/pdf/stateofstates2005.pdf

["For the past three years, state officials have steered a tough course as they faced one budget cycle after the next characterized by declining revenues and spiraling expenditures.... Most endured another bad budget year without making deep cuts to their Medicaid programs.... A combination of surging costs, enrollment, and uninsured has created a 'perfect storm' that has driven many Medicaid leaders to rethink the way their programs are structured and operate."]

[Request #S52135]

Return to the Table of Contents

HEALTH CARE FINANCING

An Ounce Less of Prevention. By Federal Funds Information for States. (FFIS, Washington, DC) June 22, 2005. 3 p.

Full Text at: www.ncsl.org/ffis/subs/ib/2005/IB05-27.pdf

["While the federal fiscal year 2005 appropriation for the Preventive Health and Health Services block grant was almost level-funded at $132 million in the Labor, Health and Human Services, Education and Related Agencies appropriations bill, a series of cuts, taps and reprogrammings has resulted in states' receiving 10.5% less than for FY 2004."]

[Request #S52136]

Return to the Table of Contents

MEDICAID

Health Centers and Rural Clinics: State and Federal Implementation Issues for Medicaid's New Payment System. By U.S. Government Accountability Office. GAO-05-452. (The Office, Washington, DC) June 2005. 62 p.

Full Text at: www.gao.gov/new.items/d05452.pdf

["The Medicare, Medicaid and SCHIP Benefits Improvement and Protection Act of 2000 (BIPA) established a prospective payment system for Medicaid payments to Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHC) and Rural Health Clinics (RHC), giving providers a financial incentive to operate efficiently.... GAO recommends that Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services’ (CMS) explore the development of a more appropriate inflation index for the prospective payment system and improve its guidance for states and its oversight of states' payment methodologies."]

[Request #S52137]

Return to the Table of Contents

MEDI-CAL

Medi-Cal Expenditures: Historical Growth and Long Term Forecasts. By Thomas MaCurdy, The Sphere Institute, and others. Prepared for Public Policy Institute of California. (The Institute, San Francisco, California) June 2005. 90 p.

Full Text at: www.ppic.org/content/pubs/OP_605TMOP.pdf

[“Medi-Cal costs are likely to rise faster than state revenue and could consume one out of every five dollars the state spends by 2015, according to a study... Though about 6 million Californians are enrolled in Medi-Cal, the study also found that only 5 percent of Medi-Cal recipients accounted for 60 percent of the spending among enrollees who are not in a managed-care plan.” Sacramento Bee (June 15, 2005) 1.]

[Request #S52138]

Return to the Table of Contents

MENTAL HEALTH

Helping Those Who Need It Most: Meeting the Mental Health Care Needs of Youth in the Foster Care and Juvenile Justice Systems. By Nell Bernstein. Prepared for California Family Impact Seminar and California Research Bureau. (CAFIS, Sacramento, California) June 2005. 66 p.

Full Text at: www.library.ca.gov/CAFIS/reports/05-01/05-01.pdf

["The purpose of this report is to inform the legislature and state policymakers, the mental health and service-provider community, and the general public about the mental health needs of high-risk youth in the foster care and juvenile justice systems and about promising models and practices to meet their needs."]

[Request #S52139]

Return to the Table of Contents

OBESITY

States React Slowly to Obesity Crisis. By University of Baltimore. IN: Statenews, vol.48, no. 6 (June/July 2005) p.10.

["According to the University of Baltimore’s Obesity Report card, state governments are failing to address the growing obesity epidemic. UB’s report graded every state based on efforts to pass legislation to control obesity."]

[Request #S52140]

Return to the Table of Contents

PRESCRIPTION DRUGS

Testimony of Robert A. Vito, Regional Inspector General for Evaluation and Inspections, Philadelphia. By HHS Office of the Inspector General. Before the U.S. Senate Committee on Finance on Medicaid Payments for Prescription Drugs. (The Inspector, Washington, DC) June 29, 2005. 12 p.

Full Text at: oig.hhs.gov/testimony/docs/2005/50629-vito-fin.pdf

[“The Medicaid health insurance program for low-income and disabled people is overpaying for prescription drugs by hundreds of millions or even billions of dollars a year. Government pricing formulas intended to keep prescription costs in check have had the opposite effect, resulting in payments that exceeded the market prices for thousands of prescriptions. Auditors looked at the 20 generic drugs on which Medicaid spent the most. What the government paid was so far above prevailing market prices at the time that, if it had paid the market price plus a 50% markup, it would have saved more than half that amount, or $78 million, one of the reports concluded.” Los Angeles Times (June 29, 20005) 1.]

[Request #S52141]

Return to the Table of Contents

HOUSING

AFFORDABLE HOUSING

"Housing Bond Doesn't Deliver: Special Report." By John Hill. IN: Sacramento Bee. (July 24, 2005) p. A1, A16-A17.

Full Text at: www.sacbee.com/content/news/story/13289694p-14131875c.html

["Three years ago, California voters approved the biggest bond to fund affordable housing in U.S. history -- but what they saw isn't what they got. They saw a campaign for the $2.1 billion Proposition 46 that promised an abundance of new affordable housing for battered women, seniors, police, veterans and others. With the pot more than half gone, a Bee investigation has found that what taxpayers are getting falls far short of those promises -- a reality that takes on added importance as California officials face the prospect of finding a fresh source of revenue."]

[Request #S52148]

Return to the Table of Contents

HUMAN SERVICES

FOSTER CARE

Fostering the Future: Safety, Performance and Well-being for Children in Foster Care. By The Pew Commission on Children in Foster Care. (The Commission, Washington, DC) 2005. 70 p.

Full Text at: pewfostercare.org/research/docs/FinalReport.pdf

["Too many children are spending more time than necessary in foster care, due in part to delays, limited information and poor communication in the nation's juvenile and family courts.... The report uses first-hand accounts from children, parents, judges, administrators and others to depict the high-stakes decisions courts make." Pew Charitable Trust (June 28, 2005) 1.]

[Request #S52142]

Return to the Table of Contents

Improving Family Foster Care: Findings from the Northwest Foster Care Alumni Study. By Peter J. Pecora, Casey Family Programs, and others. (Casey Family Programs, Seattle, Washington) March 14, 2005.

["A recent report found that when foster care experiences -- such as placement history, education services, and resources upon leaving care -- were 'optimized,' estimated outcomes improved, revealing the potential power of targeted program improvements." Connect for Kids (June 6, 2005) 1.]

Full Report. 68 p.:
http://www.casey.org/NR/rdonlyres/4E1E7C77-7624-4260-A253-892C5A6CB9E1/300/nw_alumni_study_full_apr2005.pdf

Summary. 2 p.:
http://www.casey.org/NR/rdonlyres/4E1E7C77-7624-4260-A253-892C5A6CB9E1/301/nw_alumni_study_sum_apr2005.pdf

[Request #S52143]

Return to the Table of Contents

HUNGER

More Than 2.9 Million Californians Now Food Insecure -- One in Three Low-Income. By Gail G. Harrison and others, Center for Health Policy Research, University of California, Los Angeles. (The University, Los Angeles, California) June 2005. 12 p.

Full Text at: www.healthpolicy.ucla.edu/pubs/files/Food_Insecure_PB_060105.pdf

["An increasing number of Californians wonder how they'll put their next meal on the table -- or whether they'll have one at all. By contrast, the population facing hunger in the rest of the country has remained fairly steady.... The study's authors say nearly 3 million low-income adults in California must decide daily whether to eat or pay the bills." Sacramento Bee (June 7, 2005) 1.]

[Request #S52144]

Return to the Table of Contents


STUDIES TO COME
[The following studies, reports, and documents have been ordered or requested, but have not yet arrived. Requests may be placed, and copies will be provided when the material arrives.]

EDUCATION

SCHOOL REFORM

Urban School Reform: Lessons from San Diego. Edited by Frederick M. Hess. (Harvard Education Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts) April 2005. 372 p.

["Urgent problems pertaining to governance, management, labor relations, classroom instruction, and numerous other areas face those who wish to reform and improve urban schools. Having undergone one of the nation's most comprehensive school reform efforts in recent years, San Diego has been a site of nationwide interest -- one that is uncommonly well suited to learning about the challenges facing all reformers." Publisher's Announcement (2005) NOTE: Urban School Reform ... will be available for 3-day loan.]

[Request #S52145]

Return to the Table of Contents

GENERAL GOVERNMENT

LOCAL GOVERNMENT

Private Neighborhoods and the Transformation of Local Government. By Robert H. Nelson, School of Public Policy at the University of Maryland. (Urban Institute Press, Washington, DC) 2005. 494 p.

["From 1980 to 2000, half the new housing in the United States was built in a development project governed by a neighborhood association. More than 50 million Americans now live in these associations. The author reviews the history of neighborhood associations, explains the reasons for their recent explosive growth, and speculates on their future role in American society. NOTE: Private Neighborhoods ... will be available for 3 day loan.]

[Request #S52146]

Return to the Table of Contents

HEALTH

MENTAL HEALTH

“Lifetime Prevalence and Age-of-onset Distributions of DSM-IV Disorders in the National Comorbidity Survey Replication.” By Ronald C. Kessler and others. “Failure and Delay in Initial Treatment Contact After First Onset of Mental Disorders in the National Comorbidity Survey Replication.” By Philip S. Wang and others. “Prevalence, Severity, and Comorbidity of 12-Month DSM-IV Disorders in the National Comorbidity Survey Replication.” By Ronald C. Kessler and others. AND “Twelve-Month Use of Mental Health Services in the United States.” By Philip S. Wang and others. IN: Archives of General Psychiatry, vol. 62, no. 6 (June 2005) pp. 593-640.

[“Overall, cases treated in the mental health specialty sector received more visits than those treated in the general medical sector…. The vast majority of people with lifetime disorders eventually make treatment contact…. Delay among those who eventually make treatment contact ranges from 6 to 8 years for mood disorders and 9 to 23 years for anxiety disorders…. Unmet need for treatment is greatest in traditionally underseved groups, including elderly persons, racial-ethnic minorities, those with low incomes, those without insurance, and residents of rural areas."]

[Request #S52147]

Return to the Table of Contents