Subject: Studies in the News 05-23 (August 2, 2005)


CALIFORNIA RESEARCH BUREAU
CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY
Studies in the News


Studies in the News Readings

- "Selected Readings on Obesity"    

- "December 2000 - July 2005"    

Contents This Week

Introductory Material HEALTH
   Medical care costs
   Screening for overweight children
   Soft drinks and obesity
   Promoting healthy weight in children
   Metabolic syndrome in children
   Statistics on obesity in the U.S.
   Children and a fat-reduced diet
STUDIES TO COME
   Limited physical activities for children
   Enormous cost of obesity
   Media and childhood obesity
   Fast food industry and obesity
   Obesity rates and disability trends
   American teenagers and obesity
   Obesity in childhood
   Preschoolers and nutrition
   Reducing soda at school lowers obesity
   Obesity and bullying in school-age children
   National health problem of obesity
   American obesity epidemic
   Obesity and tracking calories
   Economics of obesity
   Schools can help obesity problem
   Television viewing and childhood obesity
   Medicare accepts obesity as a disease
   State efforts to control obesity
   Obesity and school policy
   Preschool child-obesity intervention
   Obesity policies failing in America
   Americans weight increasing in last 25 years
   Economics in eating choices and weight outcomes
   Junk-food ban lowers campus revenues
   Obese children in California
   Fast food litigation
   Hunger and poverty in America
   Obesity related to urban sprawl patterns
   Economic perspectives on childhood obesity
   Childhood obesity in California
   Pediatricians asked to address childhood obesity
   Overweight children and neighborhoods
   Winning the war against childhood obesity
   Funding childhood obesity prevention
   Childhood obesity issues
   Economic cost of obesity
   Obesity epidemic and state action
   States react slowly to obesity crisis
Introduction to Studies in the News

Studies in the News is a very current compilation of items significant to the Legislature and Governor's Office. It is created weekly by the State Library's Research Bureau to supplement the public policy debate in California’s Capitol. To help share the latest information with state policymakers, these reading lists are now being made accessible through the State Library’s website. This week's list of current articles in various public policy areas is presented below.

Service to State Employees:

  • When available, the URL for the full text of each item is provided.

  • California State Employees may contact the State Information & Reference Center (916-654-0206; cslsirc@library.ca.gov) with the SITN issue number and the item number [S#].

  • All other interested individuals should contact their local library - the items may be available there, or may be borrowed by your local library on your behalf.

The following studies are currently on hand:

HEALTH

OBESITY

More Than Half of Californians in HMOs Are Overweight or Obese. By Gerald F. Kominsky and others, UCLA Center for Health Policy Research. (The Center, Los Angeles, California.) July 2005. 8p.

Full Text at: www.healthpolicy.ucla.edu/pubs/files/Obesity_HMO_PB.071905.pdf

["More than five million Californians enrolled in HMOs -- over half of all HMO enrollees ages 12 to 64 -- are overweight or obese based on a survey. It is a costly problem, adding approximately $7.7 billion a year to medical care costs in California alone. HMOs should address this problem both to help their membership lead healthier, more productive lives, and to control growing health care costs."]

[Request #S52301]

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Screening and Interventions for Overweight in Children and Adolescents. By the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. (The Task Force, Washington, DC) July 2005. Various pagings.

Full Text at: www.ahrq.gov/clinic/uspstf/uspshivi.htm

["The task force concludes that the evidence is insufficient to recommend for or against routine screening for overweight in children and adolescents as a means to prevent adverse health outcomes." MCH Alert (July 29, 2005).]

[Request #S52302]

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Liquid Candy: How Soft Drinks Are Harming Americans’ Health. By Michael F. Jacobson, Center for Science in the Public Interest. (The Center, Washington, DC) June 2005. 46 p.

Full Text at: www.cspinet.org/new/pdf/liquid_candy_final_w_new_supplement.pdf

["Soft drinks are now the single biggest source of calories in the average American's diet. In 1999-2002, carbonated soft drinks and fruit drinks provided about 13 percent of the average teenager's calories. Among the risks of frequent consumption of soft drinks: weight gain, dental caries, and osteoporosis." Connect for Kids (July 18, 2005) 1.]

[Request #S52303]

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Enhancing State and Local Capacity to Promote Healthy Weight in Children: Addressing Disparities in the Real World. By Jill Rosenthal, National Academy for State Health Policy. (The Academy, Portland, Main) June 103 p.

Full Text at: www.nashp.org/Files/GNL60_obesity_disparities_final_6.7.05.pdf

["Childhood overweight had reached epidemic proportions with many social, cultural, environmental, economic and biological contributing factors. This epidemic affects boys and girls of all ages, races, and ethnic groups. However, disparities in childhood overweight are evident in relation to income, geographic area, gender, and race or ethnicity.... This report is intended to provide practical information that states and community groups can use to implement projects aimed at reducing disparities in childhood overweight."]

[Request #S52304]

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International Obesity Task Force. By the 14th European Congress on Obesity. (Athens, Greece) June 1-2, 2005. Various pagings.

["More than half a million children in Europe may be suffering from a cluster of obesity-related risk factors that will increase their odds of developing diabetes, heart disease and stroke. New research shows that youngsters in Europe are catching up with their counterparts in the United States, where 2 million children are affected by metabolic syndrome." Reuters (June 1, 2005) 1.]

[Request #S52305]

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A Nation at Risk: Obesity in the United States: A Statistical Sourcebook. By the American Heart Association. Prepared for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. (The Association, Dallas, Texas) 2005. 42 p.

Full Text at: www.americanheart.org/downloadable/heart/1114880987205NationAtRisk.pdf

["This study shows how prevalent obesity has become and examines the factors that contribute to the patterns of unhealthy eating and insufficient physical activity that are at the heart of the epidemic.... The sourcebook is intended for use by media, policymakers, health professionals, school officials, and others in raising public awareness about obesity and getting information into the hands of those who will act on it." Maternal and Child Health Alert (May 20, 2005) 1.]

[Request #S52306]

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Children's Adaptation to a Fat-reduced Diet: The Dietary Intervention Study in Children (DISC). By L. Van Horn and L.A. Friedman. IN: Pediatrics, vol. 115, no. 6 (June 2005) pp. 1723-1733.

["The Dietary Intervention Study in Children (DISC) was a randomized, controlled trial ... to determine the long-term efficacy and safety of a dietary intervention to reduce total fat, saturated fat, and cholesterol in prepubertal children with elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol who were ages 8-10 years. The ancillary study described in this article reports new data regarding changes in eating patterns among this cohort." MCH Alert (June 10,2005) 1.]

[Request #S52307]

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PREVIOUSLY IN STUDIES IN THE NEWS
[The following studies, reports, and documents have been ordered or requested, but have not yet arrived. Requests may be placed, and copies will be provided when the material arrives.]

Overweight Kids: Why Should We Care? By Joel Cohen, California Research Bureau, California State Library. CRB 00-008 (CRB, Sacramento, California) December 2000. 42 p.

["Why kids are getting fatter -- and are at greater risk for Type II Diabetes, high blood pressure, gallbladder disease and other maladies -- and how to reverse the trend is an emerging subject for public health researchers. A new study by the California Research Bureau offers some clues. "We found the number one issue was money," Cohen said. Physical activity, for example, was limited for children whose parents can't afford to put their kids on sports teams or don't have time to shuttle their children to and from organized activities." Sacramento Bee (December 4, 2000) A1.]

[Request #S1034]

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"State-Level Estimates of Annual Medical Expenditures Attributable to Obesity." By Eric A. Finkelstein and others. IN: Obesity Research, vol. 12, no. 1 (January 2004) pp. 18-24.

["The cost of obesity is enormous in California and around the country, a new study says. Taxpayers nationwide spent $75 billion in Medicaid and Medicare funds treating obesity-related illnesses in 2003, according to a federal report.... The amount of Medicare and Medicaid money spent on obesity-related illnesses is slightly less than that spent on smoking related illnesses. Smokers account for 6% to 8% of such medical expenditures and obesity about 6%; injuries account for 10% of that spending." Los Angeles Times (January 22, 2004) A1.]

[Request #S1257]

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The Role of Media in Childhood Obesity. By the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. (The Foundation, Washington, DC) February 2004. 12 p.

Full Text at: www.kff.org/entmedia/loader.cfm?url=/commonspot/security/getfile.cfm&PageID=32022

["While the magnitude of the impact of media's effects on childhood obesity is not clear, the body of evidence indicates there is a role for media-related policies to play in a comprehensive effort to prevent and reduce childhood obesity. While this report does not endorse any specific policies, it does lay out a variety of possibilities for consideration, from reducing the time children spend with media to reducing their exposure to food advertising, to increasing the number of media messages promoting fitness and sound nutrition."]

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"The McLawsuit: The Fast-Food Industry and Legal Accountability for Obesity; No Matter What Its Ultimate Outcome in the Courts, Could Change Public Attitudes and Industry Regulation." By Michelle M. Mello and others. IN: Health Affairs, vol. 22, no. 6 (November/December 2003) pp. 207-216.

["Recent litigation brought by a group of overweight children against the McDonald's Corporation that seeks compensation for obesity-related health problems has provoked an intense public response. In this paper, the authors consider the reasonableness of the claims against fast-food companies and discuss several social effects that the litigation may have irrespective of its outcome in court." RAND Child Policy Project (December 18, 2003) 3.]

[Request #S1490]

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"Increasing Obesity Rates and Disability Trends." By Roland Sturm and others. IN: Health Affairs, vol. 23, no. 2 (March/April 2004) pp. 199-205.

Full Text at: content.healthaffairs.org/cgi/content/abstract/23/2/199

["Are older Americans becoming more or less disabled? Unhealthy body weight has increased dramatically, but other data show that disability rates have declined.... If current trends in obesity continue, disability rates will increase by 1 percent per year more in the 50-69 age group than if there were no further weight gain."]

[Request #S1662]

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"Body Mass Index and Overweight in Adolescents in 13 European Countries, Israel and the United States." By Inge Lissau and others. IN: Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, vol. 158, no. 1 (January 2004) pp. 27-33.

["Teenagers in the United States have higher rates of obesity than those in 14 other industrialized countries, including France and Germany, a study of nearly 30,000 youngsters ages 13 to 15 found. U.S. teens were more likely than those in other countries to eat fast food, snacks and sugary sodas and were more likely to be driven to school and other activities, contributing to a more sedentary lifestyle." Associated Press Online (January 5, 2004) 1.]

[Request #S1663]

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Childhood and Adolescent Overweight: The Health Professional's Guide to Identification, Treatment, and Prevention. By Mary Catherine Mullen and Jodie Shield. (American Diabetic Association, Chicago, Illinois) 2004. 217 p.

[Includes: "Overweight and Obesity Background;" "Management of Childhood and Adolescent Overweight;" and others. NOTE: Childhood and Adolescent Overweight is available for 3-day loan.]

[Request #S1664]

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"Preschooler's Choice: Tofu or Potato Chips?" By Linda Jacobson. IN: Education Week (April 21, 2004) online.

["Eating and fitness habits start early, so some preschools are introducing their young charges to good nutrition and exercise habits in efforts to combat the rise of obesity in children, reports Education Week." Connect for Kids Weekly (April 26, 2004) 1.]

[Request #S1926]

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"Preventing Childhood Obesity by Reducing Consumption of Carbonated Drinks: Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial." By Janet James and others. IN: British Medical Journal (April 27, 2004) pp. 1-5.

Full Text at: bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/reprint/bmj.38077.458438.EEv2.pdf

["School programs discouraging carbonated drinks appear to be effective in reducing obesity among children, a new study suggests.... The study found that a one-year campaign discouraging both sweetened and diet soft drinks led to a decrease in the percentage of elementary school children who were overweight or obese. The improvement occurred after a reduction in consumption of less than a can a day." New York Times (April 23, 2004) A19.]

[Request #S1972]

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"Associations Between Overweight and Obesity With Bullying Behaviors in School-Aged Children." By Ian Janssen and others. IN: Pediatrics, vol. 113, no. 5 (May 2004) pp. 1187-1194.

["Bullying A Concern For Obese Children: Overweight kids are more likely to be victims and abusers. The results in a study of 5,749 Canadian youngsters ... echo data from a U.S. study published last year in which obese children rated their quality of life as low as that of young cancer patients because of teasing and weight-related health problems." Sacramento Bee (May 3, 2004) A5.]

[Request #S1997]

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Does Obesity Contribute As Much To Morbidity As Poverty or Smoking? By Roland Sturm and Kenneth Wells. (RAND Institute, Santa Monica, California) 2001. 7 p.

["Obese people have far more health problems than either daily smokers or heavy drinkers; and, three of every five adult Americans are either overweight (36 percent) or obese (23 percent).... With 59 percent of the American population overweight, we can easily forsee a future health crisis with millions of overeaters suffering chronic diseases.... Public health officials should tackle obesity as a national health problem with the same intensity they used in fighting tobacco." San Diego Union-Tribune (June 14, 2001) B14.]

[Request #S2007]

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The Surgeon General's Call To Action To Prevent and Decrease Overweight and Obesity. By Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion; National Institutes of Health. (Office of the Surgeon General , Washington, D.C.) 2001. 39 p.

Full Text at: www.surgeongeneral.gov/topics/obesity/calltoaction/CalltoAction.pdf

[“The U.S. Surgeon General called for sweeping changes in schools, restaurants, workplaces and communities to help combat the nation’s growing epidemic of Americans who are overweight…. The report also recommends that restaurants and fast-food establishments –- where Americans now spend 40 percent of their food budget –- should offer more nutrition information so both adults and children could eat better.” Sacramento Bee (December 14, 2001) A1.]

[Request #S3001]

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Calories Count: Report of the Working Group on Obesity. By the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, U.S. Food and Drug Adminstration. (The Adminstration, Washington, DC) March 2004. Various papings.

Full Text at: www.cfsan.fda.gov/~dms/owg-toc.html#execsum

["In unveiling the Calories Count program ... the Food and Drug Administration plans to make it easier for consumers to track calories and portions by improving food labels and encouraging restaurants to provide caloric information." Washington Post (March 16, 2004) F03.]

[Request #S3134]

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The Economics of Obesity: A Report on the Workshop Held at USDA's Economic Research Service. By Tomas Philipson and others. E-FAN No. (04004). (Economic Research Service, Washington, DC) May 2004. 45 p.

Full Text at: ers.usda.gov/publications/efan04004/efan04004.pdf

["The purpose of the conference was to provide an overview of leading health economics research on the causes and consequences of rising obesity in the United States. Topics included the role of technological change in explaining both the long- and short-term trends in obesity, the role of maternal employment in child obesity, the impact of obesity on wages and health insurance, behavioral economics as applied to obesity, and the challenges in measuring energy intakes and physical activity. The workshop also discussed policy implications and future directions for obesity research. This report presents a summary of the papers and the discussions presented at the workshop."]

[Request #S3173]

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Childhood and Adolescent Obesity: Making the Orange County Schools Part of the Solution. By the Orange County Grand Jury. (The Jury, Santa Ana, California) June 2004. 17 p.

Full Text at: www.occourts.org/grndjury/obesitystudyreport.pdf

["Nearly 100,000 Orange County students -- 1 out of every 5 school-age children -- are either overweight or obese, the Orange County Grand Jury reported. The county's 28 school districts need to increase efforts to encourage students to eat right and exercise more, the report recommends." Los Angeles Times (June 9, 2004) B3.]

[Request #S3374]

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"Programming Obesity in Childhood." By David Ludwig and Steven Grotmaker. IN: Lancet, vol. 364, no. 9430. (July 17, 2004) pp. 226-227.

["According to this new study, children who watch more than 2 hours of television a night seem to be at a higher risk of becoming smokers or being fat, out of shape, or having high cholesterol as adults. It found that even an average weeknight viewing of one or two hours between the ages of 5 and 15 was associated with the higher body-mass, lower cardio-respiratory fitness, increased and raised cholesterol." Associated Press (July 15, 2004) 1.]

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U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Announces Revised Medicare Obesity Coverage Policy: Press Release. By the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. (The Department, Washington, DC) July 15, 2004. 1 p.

Full Text at: www.os.dhhs.gov/news/press/2004pres/20040715.html

["The federal Medicare program abandoned a long-standing policy that obesity is not a disease, removing what has been a major roadblock for many people trying to get treatment for the burgeoning health problem." San Francisco Chronicle (July 16, 2004) 1.]

[Request #S3596]

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State Efforts to Control Obesity. By Zoltan Acs and others, University of Baltimore. (The University, Baltimore, Maryland) 2004.

["Half of all states are failing -- and another 10 just keeping pace -- to control obesity (medically defined as a body-mass index equal to or greater than 30), according to this report card. Obesity harms more than the adults and children it affects. It also costs the United States tens of billions of dollars annually in health care costs. The report found only one state, Arkansas, that is taking significant steps via legislation, regulation and education to combat obesity among its population." Connect for Kids Weekly (August 24, 2004).]

State Obesity Map. Various pagings.:
http://www.ubalt.edu/experts/obesity/map.html

Obesity Report Card. Various pagings.:
http://www.ubalt.edu/experts/obesity/states.html

[Request #S3866]

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Responding to Childhood Obesity Through School Policy: [Talkback Live Transcript.] By Education Week on the Web. (Education Week, Bethesda, Maryland) July 29, 2004. 15 p.

["As the nation's children grow heavier, policymakers, health officials, and interest groups are pressuring schools to provide students with healthier meals and snacks and more time for physical activity during the school day. Fewer than 35 percent of students today attend daily physical activity classes, and most schools don't require physical education, the CDC reports. At the same time, the federal agency says, half of all districts have a contract that gives a company the rights to sell soft drinks in schools. Some states have already moved to limit the sale of candy and soda in schools, but asking schools to give up the lucrative vending deals offered by companies such as Coca Cola is no small matter." Education Week (July 29, 2004). 1.]

[Request #S3974]

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"Feasibility and Benefits of a Parent-Focused Preschool Child Obesity Intervention." By Elizabeth McGarvey and others. IN: American Journal of Public Health, vol. 94, no. 9 (September 2004) pp. 1490-1495.

["This study found that, after obesity-prevention education at WIC centers, parents more often offer their children water and engage with them in active play, and increasing PE in kindergarten and first grade by one hour per week could reduce overweight in 5- and 6-year-old girls by up to 10%." Action Alliance for Children Email News Bulletin (September 2004).]

[Request #S4124]

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F as in Fat: How Obesity Policies Are Failing in America. By Shelly A. Hearne and others, Trust for America's Health. (The Trust, Washington, DC) 2004. 92 p.

Full Text at: healthyamericans.org/reports/obesity/ObesityReport.pdf

["Obesity has become an epidemic in America and is poised to become the nation's leading health problem and number one killer. Already the cause of 400,000 deaths a year -- or 45 per hour -- obesity will soon overtake tobacco use as the leading cause of preventable death, if current trends continue."]

[Request #S4381]

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"Mean Body Weight, Height, and Body Mass Index, United States 1960-2002." By Cynthia L. Ogden. IN: Advance Data No. 347. (October 27, 2004) pp. 1-18.

Full Text at: www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/ad/ad347.pdf

["Adult men and women are roughly an inch taller than they were in 1960, but are nearly 25 pounds heavier on average as well, according to a new report.... Meanwhile, the report documented that average weights for children are increasing as well."]

[Request #S4611]

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The Role of Economics in Eating Choices and Weight Outcomes. By Lisa Mancino, Biing-Hwan Lin, and Nicole Ballenger, Economic Research Service, United States Department of Agriculture. Agriculture Information Bulletin no. 791. (The Service, Washington, DC) October 2004. 24 p.

Full Text at: www.ers.usda.gov/publications/aib791/aib791.pdf

["This report examines economic factors that help explain variation in behaviors and attitudes associated with weight outcomes among U.S. adults. It draws data from the 1994-96 Continuing Survey of Food Intakes by Individuals and the 1994-96 Diet and Health Knowledge Survey." MCH Alert (November 12, 2004) 1.]

[Request #S4612]

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"Junk Food Ban Eats Revenues." By Jennifer Radcliffe. IN: Los Angeles Daily News (November 30, 2004) p. A1.

["Five months into the much-touted junk-food ban in Los Angeles public schools, the drop-off in revenue from sales of soda, candy and other popular items at student stores and vending machines has hit many campuses hard. Sales are down by more than 60 percent at some campuses, costing them $1,000 or more each per week." Los Angeles Daily News (November 30, 2004) 1.]

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An Epidemic: Overweight and Unfit Children in California Assembly Districts. By Sarah Stone and others, Samuels and Associates. Prepared for California Center for Public Health Advocacy. (The Center, Davis, California) December 2002. 85 p.

Full Text at: www.publichealthadvocacy.org/policy_briefs/study_documents/Full_Report1.pdf

["More than 25% of California children are overweight and about 40% are not physically fit, according to a statewide study of fifth-, seventh- and ninth-graders. The study reviewed physical fitness and body composition tests for 1.2 million children in public schools and then organized the data by Assembly district." California Healthline (December 12, 2002).]

[Request #S7051]

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Burger, Fries and Lawyers: The Beef Behind Obesity Lawsuits. By Todd G. Buchholz, Enso Capital Management. Prepared for the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the U.S. Chamber Institute for Legal Reform. (The Chamber, Washington, DC) July 2, 2003. 28 p.

Full Text at: www.legalreformnow.com/resources/burgers.pdf

[“The fast food industry is not to blame, Buchholz said. Buchholz's' study disproves one of the litigation's main arguments that the fast food companies 'duped' their patrons into buying unhealthy products because they did not know any better. His study shows that the rise in obesity in the last 20 years has actually been among college educated people.” UPI (July 3, 2003) 1.]

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The Paradox of Hunger and Obesity in America. By the Center on Hunger and Poverty, Brandeis University, and the Food Research and Action Center. (The Center, Waltham, Massachussetts) July 2003. 5 p.

Full Text at: www.centeronhunger.org/pdf/hungerandobesity.pdf

["Challenging current knowledge about the epidemics of obesity and hunger in America, this report examines the emerging and seemingly paradoxical relationship between hunger, food insecurity and obesity. It also examines the health risks of both hunger/food insecurity and obesity, and how both of these serious threats can co-exist in the same household."]

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"Relationship Between Urban Sprawl and Physical Activity, Obesity, and Morbidity." By Reid Ewing, National Center for Smart Growth, and others. IN: American Journal of Health Promotion, vol. 18, no. 1 (2003) pp. 47-57.

["Residents of counties that contain large amounts of urban sprawl walk less, weigh more and are at a greater risk of developing high blood pressure, according to a study. The study is the first large-scale, national study to link sprawl with negative health outcomes and to quantify them ." Wall Street Journal (August 29, 2003) 1.]

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"Economic Perspectives on Childhood Obesity." By Patricia M. Anderson and others. IN: Economic Perspectives, vol. 27, no. 3 (Third Quarter, 2003) pp. 30-48.

["We discuss why trends in obesity, and childhood obesity in particular, are of interest from an economic perspective.... We document changes in obesity over time in the United States.... We discuss changes in children's lives that may be causally related to weight gain."]

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A Health Crisis in Paradise: Youth and Chronic Diseases in California's Gold Coast. By the Gold Coast Collaborative. (The Collaborative, Santa Barbara, California) September 24, 2003. 6 p.

Full Text at: ucce.ucdavis.edu/files/filelibrary/2372/11294.pdf

["Childhood Obesity, Related Health Problems Increase in Three Counties, Study Finds: The coalition ... recommended that elected officials, educators and others hold forums in 2004 to identify methods to decrease obesity, eliminate junk food and soft drinks on local school campuses and develop policies that promote physical education." California Healthline (September 25, 2003) 1.]

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Remarks Presented to American Academy of Pediatrics. And Remarks Presented to the 2003 California Childhood Obesity Conference. By Richard Carmona, U.S. Surgeon General. (Office of the Surgeon General, Washington, DC) 2003. Various pagings.

["Surgeon General asks pediatricians to address issue of childhood obesity. ... health problems related to obesity cost the United States $117 billion per year in medical costs and lost productivity and cause about 300,000 death each year. We must teach our children to enjoy healthy foods in healthy proportions. We must encourage all children to be physically active for at least 60 minutes a day." California Healthline (November 6, 2003) 1.]

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"Neighborhood Playgrounds, Fast Food Restaurants, and Crime: Relationships to Overweight in Low-Income Preschool Children." By Hillary L. Burdette, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, and Robert C. Whitaker, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. IN: Preventive Medicine, vol. 38, issue 1 (January 2004) pp. 57-63.

["This study examined the relationship between overweight preschool children and environmental factors — the proximity of the children’s residences to playgrounds and to fast food restaurants and the safety of the children’s neighborhoods. The study concluded that the overweight condition was not associated with proximity to playgrounds and fast food restaurants or with the level of neighborhood crime."]

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Fed Up! Winning the War Against Childhood Obesity. By Susan Okie. (National Academies Press, Washington, DC) 2005. 336 p.

Full Text at: www.nap.edu/catalog/11023.html

["Even conservative estimates show that 15% of all children are now considered to be overweight. Worldwide there are 22 million kids under five years old that are defined as fat. This book provides in-depth background on the issue of childhood obesity and gives honest, authoritative, science-based advice that constitute our best weapons in this critical battle." NOTE: Fed Up ... will be available for 3-day loan.]

[Request #S50630]

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Financing Childhood Obesity Prevention Programs: Federal Funding Sources and Other Strategies. By the Finance Project. (The Project, Washington, DC) September 2004. 65 p.

Full Text at: www.financeprojectinfo.org/publications/obesityprevention.pdf

["This guide profiles federal funding sources that can be used to support obesity prevention strategies from communities utilizing these funds, and key considerations to help leaders develop financing plans to meet their program goals."]

[Request #S50926]

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"Weighing in on the Issue of Childhood Obesity." By Cynthia Lunn-Grabe and James L. Hoot. IN: Childhood Education: Infancy Through Early Adolescence, vol. 81, no. 2 (Winter 2004/05) pp. 70-76.

["This article focuses on overweight children and the role that educators (and schools) might play in supporting and reinforcing this unhealthful lifestyle. Included are strategies for promoting more healthful eating and activity habits. The article concludes with a list of resources offering additional help in addressing this growing threat."]

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The Economic Costs of Physical Inactivity, Obesity, and Overweight in California Adults During the Year 2000: A Technical Analysis. By David Chenoweth, California Department of Health Services. (The Department, Sacramento, California) April 2005. 45 p.

Full Text at: www.dhs.ca.gov/ps/cdic/cpns/press/downloads/CostofObesityFullTechnicalReport.pdf

[“Californians' battle with the waistline, which shows no sign of receding, not only negatively impacts our health, but is now threatening the state's economic well-being as well.... The study notes a 109 percent increase in overweight Californians between 1991 and 2001…. The study now makes clear the economic reality of obesity costs to California -- $11.2 billion annually in lost productivity; $10.2 billion in medical care; and $388 million in workers' compensation. The bill for all this overindulgence is being paid by the 'public and private employers in the form of health insurance and lost productivity,' the study stated.” Ventura County Star (April 12, 2005) 6.]

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"Childhood Obesity Epidemic Spurs State Action." By Dan Lorentz. IN: Statenews, vol. 48 no. 6. (June/July 2005) pp. 12-15.

["If the rapid rise in childhood obesity is left unchecked, kids alive today may be the first generation in 200 years to have shorter life expectancies than their parents. And on the way to their earlier graves, this generation of children will likely drive up medical costs. This realization is leading many state legislatures to feel urgency in their efforts to combat the epidemic, especially among children."]

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States React Slowly to Obesity Crisis. By University of Baltimore. IN: Statenews, vol. 48, no. 6 (June/July 2005) p.10.

["According to the University of Baltimore’s Obesity Report card, state governments are failing to address the growing obesity epidemic. UB’s report graded every state based on efforts to pass legislation to control obesity."]

[Request #S52140]

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