Subject: Studies in the News 05-26 (August 16, 2005)


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Studies in the News for
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Children and Families Commission


Contents This Week

Introductory Material EDUCATION
   Evaluation of Abbott Preschool Program
   State policies on full-day kindergarten
   Teacher preparation requires investment
   Expanding preschool in California
   Preparing California early education teachers
   Teacher competencies in early education
HEALTH
   Children's health encyclopedia
   Play interventions for children
   Low birth weight and chronic conditions
   Oral health and special needs children
   Infants' language development.
HUMAN SERVICES
   Attachment from infancy to adulthood
   Children's views of kinship care placement
STUDIES TO COME
   Preschool friendships and disabilities
   Asthma and racial/ethnic differences
   Disparities in children's health and care
   Poverty and child outcomes
Introduction to Studies in the News

Studies in the News: Children and Family Supplement is a service provided to the First 5 California by the California State Library. The service features weekly lists of current articles focusing on Children and Family policy. Prior lists can be viewed from the California State Library's Web site at www.library.ca.gov/CRB/SITN/.

How to Obtain Materials Listed in SITN:

  • When available on the Internet, the URL for the full-text of each item is provided.

  • California State Employees may contact the State Information & Reference Center (916-654-0206; cslsirc@library.ca.gov) with the SITN issue number and the item number [S#].

  • All other interested individuals should contact their local library - the items may be available there, or may be borrowed by your local library on your behalf.

The following studies are currently on hand:

EDUCATION

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

Giant Steps for the Littlest Children: Progress in the Sixth Year of the Abbott Preschool Program. By Cynthia Esposito Lamy, Rutgers University, and others. (New Jersey Department of Education, Trenton, New Jersey) May 18, 2005. 15 p.

Full Text at: www.state.nj.us/njded/ece/abbott/giantsteps/giantsteps.pdf

["Using a rigorous, scientifically sound method of assessing the Abbott preschool program, this study shows that Abbott preschool children are enjoying a nurturing, safe and intellectually challenging experience. They have increasingly qualified teachers who are supported by expert classroom consultants and administrators. These experiences are improving their chances of school success and helping to close the achievement gap by providing a giant step as they stride through the starting gate."]

[Request #S52601]

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Full-Day Kindergarten: A Study of State Policies in the United States. By Kristie Kauerz, Education Commission of the States. (The Commission, Denver, Colorado) June 2005. 28 p.

Full Text at: www.ecs.org/clearinghouse/62/41/6241.pdf

["While kindergarten has been delivered primarily as a half-day program since the Great Depression of the 1930s, fundamental changes in American society and education over the past 20 years support a greater emphasis on full-day kindergarten. Today, full-day kindergarten offers several potential benefits. It provides continuity for children accustomed to full-day experiences outside of the home, provides continuity with schedules in 1st grade and beyond, reduces the number of disruptions and transitions children experience in a typical day, and allows teachers more time for both formal and informal instruction that provide meaningful learning opportunities. It also provides an important opportunity to align the policies and practices of the grades that follow kindergarten with those of the early learning programs that typically come before."]

[Request #S52602]

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HEAD START

Making the Case: Improving Head Start Teacher Qualifications Requires Increased Investment. By Katherine Hart and Rachel Schumacher, Center for Law and Social Policy. Head Start Series. Paper No. 1. (The Center, Washington, DC) July 2005. 16 p.

Full Text at: www.clasp.org/publications/hs_policy_paper_1.pdf

["This study concludes that Head Start reauthorization presents an important opportunity for Congress to make the goal of raising early childhood teacher education qualifications real and not another unfunded mandate that places burdens on states, programs, and teachers. An unfunded mandate will likely result in turnover and instability for the many children that rely on Head Start."]

[Request #S52603]

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PRESCHOOL

Expanding Access to High-Quality Preschool Programs: A Resource and Policy Guide for School Leaders. By the California School Boards Association. (The Association, Sacramento, California) May 2005. 82 p.

Full Text at: www.csba.org/is/ps/Preschool_guide.pdf

["Research suggests that providing high-quality preschool program opportunities for young children can have a profound, positive impact on their readiness for school and beyond. Recent research has also found that high-quality preschool programs have a positive return on the publicís investment. In spite of this research, almost half of all children in California are not enrolled in preschool programs. This guide is designed to support local school district and county office of education efforts to expand access to these programs in their community."]

[Request #S52604]

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TEACHERS

Time to Revamp and Expand: Early Childhood Teacher Preparation Programs in California's Insitutions of Higher Learning. By Marcy Whitebook and others. (Center for the Study of Child Care Employment, Berkeley, California) August 2005.

["This study presents the results of an inventory of nearly all (98.5%) of the California institutions of higher education that train adults to teach children under the age of five, including certificate, associate, bachelorís, masterís and PhD programs. The report includes data on student and faculty characteristics, coursework and practica, challenges faced by these programs, and student supports."]

Full Report. 57 p.:
http://www.iir.berkeley.edu/cscce/pdf/revamp_report.pdf

Executive Summary. 12 p.:
http://www.iir.berkeley.edu/cscce/pdf/revamp-summary.pdf

[Request #S52605]

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Establishing Teacher Competencies in Early Care and Education:A Review of Current Models and Options for California. By Dan Bellm, Institute of Industrial Relations, U.C. Berkeley. (Center for the Study of Child Care Employment, Berkeley, California) 2005. 19 p.

Full Text at: www.iir.berkeley.edu/cscce/pdf/competencies.pdf

["More than a dozen states have established a set of teacher competencies for the early care and education field, with the goal of assuring that all teachers of young children have the necessary knowledge and skills to meet childrenís developmental needs. This policy brief discusses the purpose of teacher competencies, reviews the subject areas that competencies generally cover, outlines options for how they might be developed and structured in California, and gives examples of major efforts by national organizations and other states."]

[Request #S52606]

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HEALTH

CHILDREN

The Encyclopedia of Children's Health and Wellness: Volume 1. By Carol Turkington and Albert Tzeel. (Facts on File, New York, New York) 2004. 323 p.

["Turkington (a medical writer) and Tzeel (pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Wisconsin) have co-authored a comprehensive reference that will be useful to parents and other non-specialized readers. The more than 600 entries, arranged alphabetically, are written with a focus on clear descriptions of illness and conditions, practical tips and guidance. Entry topics range from general symptoms and issues, such as abrasion, itching, adoption, headache, and reading, to specific conditions, including ADHD, borderline personality disorder, celiac disease, ectodermal dysplasia, and West Nile virus. Seven appendices contain guidelines for handling emergencies, a list of typical childhood infections and diseases and contact information for associations, camps for kids with cancer, toll-free health hotlines, children's hospitals in the US, and poison control centers in the US and Canada. A glossary and bibliography are included." Book News (2004). NOTE: The Encyclopedia ... is available for 3-day loan.]

[Request #S52607]

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Empirically Based Play Interventions for Children. Edited by Linda A. Reddy and others. (American Psychological Association, Washington, DC) 2005. 310 p.

["This text offers a clinical reference of evidence-based play interventions for a variety of populations and settings, illustrating both directive and non-directive approaches. Each chapter offers theory, observations, and data. Editors Reddy, Schaefer (psychology, Fairleigh Dickinson University), and Hall (a school psychologist) present 13 contributions from psychologists working in various contexts who discuss play prevention programs and interventions for internalizing, externalizing, and developmental disorders. Each chapter includes a description of the theoretical basis, treatment processes, outcome studies, and evaluation approach." Book News, Inc. (2004). NOTE: Empirically Based Play ... is available for 3-day loan.]

[Request #S52608]

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"Chronic Conditions, Functional Limitations, and Special Health Care Needs of School-Age Children Born With Extremely Low-birth-weight in the 1990s." By M. Hack and others. IN: JAMA Journal of the American Medical Association, vol. 294, no. 3 (July 20, 2005) pp. 318-325.

["'Our results reveal that ELBW [extremely low-birthweight] children have extremely high rates of chronic conditions compared with NBW [normal birthweight] children,' write the authors of this article. Advances in perinatal care in the 1990s resulted in dramatic increases in the survival of ELBW infants (<1,000 g). This has been accompanied by an increase in the rates of neonatal complications and early childhood neurodevelopmental problems. However, there is little information about how these children function at school age. The study described in this article examines health outcomes of 8-year-olds in a cohort of ELBW children born from 1992 through 1995.... The authors conclude that 'proactive planning for the long-term health and educational needs of all ELBW survivors is essential to optimally treat and possibly improve outcomes through preventive and early intervention services.'" MCH Alert (July 29, 2005).]

[Request #S52609]

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DENTAL CARE

Oral Health Services for Children and Adolescents with Special Health Care Needs: Resource Guide. By the National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center. (The Center, Washington, DC) 2005. 36 p.

Full Text at: www.mchoralhealth.org/PDFs/SHCNResGuide.pdf

["This Resource Guide provides a list of journal articles, materials, and federal agencies and national organizations that may serve as resources for ensuring optimal care for children and adolescents with special health care needs." MCH Alert (July 8, 2005).]

[Request #S52610]

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INFANTS

"Infants' Use of Synchronized Visual Information to Separate Streams of Speech." By George Hollich and others. IN: Child Development, vol. 76, no.3 (May 2005) pp. 598-613.

["A study concludes that even moderate background noise can affect how infants learn language at an early and crucial time of their development. 'This research reaffirms how important it is for a child to see the face of a person while earing him or her speak.' says a researcher. 'This is the first study to show how children are easily distracted when the background noise is at the same loudness as the person talking to the child.'" Ascribe Newswire. (June 15,2005) 1.]

[Request #S52611]

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HUMAN SERVICES

CHILDREN

Attachment from Infancy to Adulthood: the Major Longitudinal Studies. Edited By Klaus E. Grossmann and others. (The Guilford Press, New York, New York) 2005. 332 p.

["The book reviews the foundations of attachment research, tracing the ethological underpinnings of John Bowlby's seminal work.... Other chapters on each study give particular attention to the complexities of tracking developmental outcomes over time and the challenges of translating theoretical contructs into age-appropriate assessments. The findings presented here yield vital insights into the long-term effects of mother-infant relationships, nonmaternal care, and other early experiences." NOTE: Attachment ... is available for 3-day loan.]

[Request #S52612]

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FOSTER CARE

From the Child's Perspective: A Qualitative Analysis of Kinship Care Placements. By Jill Therese Messing. (National Abandoned Infants Resource Center, Berkeley, California) March 2005. 26 p.

Full Text at: socrates.berkeley.edu/~aiarc/media/pdf/kinship_research_summary.pdf

["Results of the focus group discussions show that these children generally viewed their family constellations as fluid. This view led to their belief that they were still living with 'family' and that there was little, if any, stigma associated with kinship care. The children expressed conflicting feelings about their birth parents that included anger, disappointment, love, and hopefulness. Children who lived with legal guardians seemed to derive some comfort from the fact that the relatives had legal rights, and these children seemed more secure in their placements than those in informal placements." Children's Bureau Express (July/August 2005).]

[Request #S52613]

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STUDIES TO COME
[The following studies, reports, and documents have been ordered or requested, but have not yet arrived. Requests may be placed, and copies will be provided when the material arrives.]

EDUCATION

PRESCHOOL

"A Look at Friendships Between Preschool-aged Children With and Without Disabilities in Two Inclusive Classrooms." By Sylvia L. Dietrich. IN: Journal of Early Childhood Research, vol. 3, no. 2 (2005) pp. 193-215.

["A naturalistic study of six naturally occurring friendships among preschool-aged children with and without disabilities in inclusive settings was conducted with the children, their parents, and teachers. Data were collected through participant observations and interviews. Descriptive field notes, a fieldwork journal, and transcribed interviews were inductively analysed. Analysis uncovered descriptions, meanings, and revealed various perspectives regarding the friendships studied including those of the children, parents, and teachers. The friendships are described as typical and portray characteristics that are common among friendships during the preschool-age period. The friendships were dynamic and changed throughout the course of the study. Several factors influenced the formation of the friendships including: similarity in play styles; the opportunity to engage in similar activities; similar knowledge and interests; proximity; and parental factors. Implications for further research are discussed."]

[Request #S52614]

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HEALTH

ASTHMA

"Racial and Ethnic Differences in Asthma Diagnosis Among Children Who Wheeze." By Lara J. Akinbami and others. IN: Pediatrics, vol. 115, no. 5 (May 1, 2005) pp. 1254-1260.

["Researchers' findings do not provide evidence for the hypothesis that symptomatic minority children are underdiagnosed with asthma compared with non-Hispanic white children. To the contrary, among currently symptomatic children, minority children were more likely to be diagnosed than non-Hispanic white children even after accounting for the higher wheezing severity among minority children." RAND Child Policy Update (July 28, 2005).]

[Request #S52615]

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CHILDREN

Disparities in Children's Health and Health Care [Issue Theme.] IN: Public Health Reports, vol. 120, no. 4 (July/August 2005)

["This issue presents available evidence to support decisions addressing disparities in U.S. child health and health care. Topics include: (1) children's access to primary care, mental health, and dental care; (2) the intergenerational and life course effects of socioeconomic disparities on child health; and (3) prioritizing a research agenda for understanding and eliminating child health disparities." MCH Alert (July 29, 2005).]

[Request #S52616]

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HUMAN SERVICES

"Duration and Developmental Timing of Poverty and Children's Cognitive and Social Development From Birth Through Third Grade." By the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Early Child Care Research Network. IN: Child Development, (vol. 76, no. 4) July 2005. pp. 795-810.

["Children who live in chronic poverty from birth through age 9 score lowest on tests of school readiness and social competence, but poverty at any time during that period is detrimental. Thatís according to a new study reported in the July/August 2005 issue of Child Development. The findings contradict earlier research that if the family moved out of poverty later, there would not necessarily be serious long-term effects. Instead it found later poverty Ė from age 4 to 9 Ė was linked to increased school and social problems." Connect for Kids (August 1, 2005) 1.]

[Request #S52617]

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