Subject: Studies in the News 05-39 (November 1, 2005)


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Studies in the News for
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Children and Families Commission


Contents This Week

Introductory Material EDUCATION
   Assessing young English-language learners
   Regional differences in early education
   Cost benefits of pre-kindergarten in Wisconsin
   Media coverage of pre-kindergarten
   School readiness and Hmong children
   Early childhood learning standards
   Early formal public schooling
HEALTH
   Gaps in children's health coverage
   Children with hearing loss
   Stress in early childhood
   Testing vision in preschoolers
   Infant mental health and childcare
STUDIES TO COME
   Cultural differences in maternal teaching
   Reading to children
   Policy statement on SIDS
Introduction to Studies in the News

Studies in the News: Children and Family Supplement is a service provided to the First 5 California by the California State Library. The service features weekly lists of current articles focusing on Children and Family policy. Prior lists can be viewed from the California State Library's Web site at www.library.ca.gov/CRB/SITN/.

How to Obtain Materials Listed in SITN:

  • When available on the Internet, the URL for the full-text of each item is provided.

  • California State Employees may contact the State Information & Reference Center (916-654-0206; cslsirc@library.ca.gov) with the SITN issue number and the item number [S#].

  • All other interested individuals should contact their local library - the items may be available there, or may be borrowed by your local library on your behalf.

The following studies are currently on hand:

EDUCATION

BILINGUAL EDUCATION

Screening and Assessment of Young English-language Learners: Supplement to the NAEYC Position Statement on Early Childhood Curriculum, Assessment, and Program Evaluation. By the National Association for the Education of Young Children. (The Association, Washington, DC) Summer 2005. 21 p.

Full Text at: www.naeyc.org/about/positions/pdf/ELL_Supplement.pdf

["If well implemented, the recommendations presented in this document would contribute to more positive developmental and educational outcomes for the millions of young English-language learners served by early childhood programs. At present and as emphasized throughout this document, the conditions needed to fully implement the recommendations do not yet exist, although promising practices are evident in many settings—practices that need to be better identified and showcased as models."]

[Request #S53901]

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EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

Regional Differences in Kindergartners' Early Education Experiences: Statistics in Brief. By Emily Rosenthal, Education Statistics Services Institute, and others, National Center for Education Statistics. (The Center, Washington, DC) June 2005. 15 p.

Full Text at: nces.ed.gov/pubs2005/2005099.pdf

["This report takes a closer look at two of kindergartners' early education experiences, preschool and kindergarten, in each of four regions of the United States (i.e., Northeast, South, Midwest, and West).... This report attempts to answer two questions about kindergartners' early education experiences within and across four regions of the United States: 1) What are the regional differences in kindergartners' preschool experiences (e.g., center-based care or Head Start the year before kindergarten entry) in the United States? and 2) Are there regional differences in kindergartners' participation in full-day versus half-day kindergarten programs in the United States?"]

[Request #S53902]

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An Economic Analysis of Four-year-old Kindergarten in Wisconsin: Returns to the Education System. By Clive R. Belfield, City University of New York, and Dennis K. Winters, NorthStar Economics. (Trust for Early Education, Washington, DC) September 2005. 28 p.

Full Text at: www.preknow.org/documents/WIEconImpactReport_Sept2005.pdf

["For every $1 invested in pre-k, Wisconsin would save 68 cents in future spending on K-12 education, according to a new report released in September by Pre-K Now. The first-of-its-kind statewide study examined the potential savings to Wisconsin's K-12 system if the state expanded Four-Year-Old Kindergarten (4K) to more children. Researchers found that even greater savings are possible in Milwaukee, where each dollar invested would return 76 cents in K-12 savings. The report provides compelling economic evidence of the cost savings associated with high-quality pre-k and gives new motives to increase the availablity of pre-k in Wisconsin and other states." Pre-K Post (October 2005) 1.]

[Request #S53903]

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Covering the Campaign to Expand and Improve Pre-kindergarten: A Journalist's Primer. By the Hechinger Institute on Education and the Media. (Teacher's College, Columbia University, New York, New York) [2005.] 44 p.

Full Text at: www.tc.columbia.edu/centers/hechinger/resources/Pre-K05_Report-FINAL.pdf

["With contributions from 10 journalists from around the country and an overview of the issues and tensions within the movement to expand pre-kindergarten, this primer is a useful tool for journalists who cover early childhood education as well as those who speak to journalists about these issues."]

[Request #S53904]

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Hmong Early Childhood Education Needs Assessment. By Zha Blong Xiong, University of Minnesota and Jesse Kao Lee, Ready4K. (Ready4K, Saint Paul, Minnesota) 2005. 32 p.

Full Text at: www.ready4k.org/vertical/Sites/{C2E38BFF-E19D-4F31-8282-94D11BD421A4}/uploads/{662ADF71-DBA0-47FB-9986-AB6BCE69585E}.PDF

["A groundbreaking study of school readiness within the Hmong community confirms what is true for all children entering kindergarten in Minnesota: many are not fully ready to learn. A language barrier and limited parental education are two leading challenges for many Hmong parents and their children.... The study is a first look at early care and education in the growing Hmong population. Minnesota has the second largest Hmong population in the United States, and yet little formalized research has been conducted within this diverse community." (Note: California has the largest Hmong population in the United States.) Saint Paul Asian American Press (October 19, 2005) 1.]

[Request #S53905]

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Early Learning Standards. By the Early Childhood Education Section, Arizona Department of Education. (The Department, Phoenix, Arizona) 2005. 127 p.

Full Text at: www.ade.state.az.us/earlychildhood/downloads/UpdatedStandards.pdf

["The Arizona Early Learning Standards have been developed to provide a framework for the planning of quality learning experiences for all children 3 to 5 years of age. The standards cover a broad range of skill development and provide a useful instructional foundation for children from diverse backgrounds and with diverse abilities. The standards are intended for use by all those who work with young children in any early care and education setting in urban, rural and tribal communities."]

[Request #S53906]

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PRESCHOOL

Assessing Proposals for Preschool and Kindergarten: Essential Information for Parents, Taxpayers, and Policymakers. By Darcy Olsen, Goldwater Institute. (The Sutherland Institute, Salt Lake City, Utah) June 1, 2005. 31 p.

Full Text at: www.sjlpp.org/documents/proposals.pdf

["Last year, immediately after the Sutherland Institute released its policy recommendation that a $500 tax credit ought to be given to parents that would keep their kindergarten-age children home rather than placing them in public school, a maelstrom of criticism reverberated throughout local media and certain segments of the public education community…. The Sutherland Institute argued then, as it does now, that, nearly without exception, little children are better off around their parents on a full-time basis than they would be placed in early, formal public schooling…. All of the preschool studies over the years used to justify the growing push for early, formal public schooling actually prove this point. Each of these studies show that little children from sub-standard or dysfunctional homes do better in early, formal public schooling. And each shows that early, formal public schooling for other little children is 'educationally insignificant.'"]

[Request #S53907]

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HEALTH

CHILDREN

Santa Clara County Healthy Kids Program: Impacts on Children's Medical, Dental, and Vision Care. By Christopher Trenholm, Mathematica Policy Research, and others. (Mathematica, Princeton, New Jersey) July 2005.

["Health insurance coverage for children remains a serious policy issue throughout the United States. The Santa Clara County Children's Health Initiative (CHI), launched in January 2001, is an ambitious effort to close gaps in health insurance coverage for children. This report underscores the unique characteristics of children taking part in Healthy Kids and identifies many significant improvements in their medical care and dental and vision care as a result of participating in the program."]

Full Report. 54 p.:
www.mathematica-mpr.com/publications/PDFs/santaclara.pdf

Appendices. 106 p.:
http://www.mathematica-mpr.com/PDFs/santaclara-app.pdf

[Request #S53908]

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Opening Doors: Technology and Communication Options for Children With Hearing Loss. By the Academy for Educational Development. Prepared for the U.S. Department of Education. (The Department, Washington, DC) 2005. 8 p.

Full Text at: www.ed.gov/about/offices/list/osers/products/opening_doors/opening_doors.pdf

["The early years are a critical time for learning language. This document discusses the importance of early intervention, which means getting started as early as possible to address the individual needs of a child with disabilities. Early intervention is a system of services established by the states through grants from the federal government to help eligible children from birth until their third birthday. The following topics are discussed in this document: 1) First Reactions; 2) Breaking the Sound Barrier; 3) Groups Specializing in Hearing Loss and Deafness; and 4) Exploring Communication Options. This document also contains a list of organizations and web sites that contain information on hearing loss and deafness."]

[Request #S53909]

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Excessive Stress Disrupts the Architecture of the Developing Brain. National Scientific Council on the Developing Child. Working Paper No. 3. (The Heller School, Brandeis University, Waltham, Massachusetts) Summer 2005. 16 p.

Full Text at: developingchild.net/papers/excessive_stress.pdf

["This paper will be particularly valuable to policy makers and civic leaders who want to understand the underlying biological mechanisms that help explain why children who experience significant stress in the early childhood years are more likely to have later problems in learning and behavior, as well as in physical and mental health."]

[Request #S53910]

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Vision in Preschoolers Study (VIP Study.) By the National Eye Institute, U.S. National Institutes of Health. (The Institute, Bethesda, Maryland) 2005. 10 p.

Full Text at: www.nei.nih.gov/neitrials/static/study85.asp

["This study has found that 11 common tests for vision vary widely in their ability to detect vision problems in preschoolers even when administered by highly trained personnel. Researchers conducting Phase 1 of the Vision In Preschoolers (VIP) study narrowed the list of tests to be used on preschool children to the four best. When trained lay screeners administered the tests, they detected up to 68 percent of children with at least one of the vision problems being considered in the study. The Institute says not enough children are screened for vision problems before attending preschool." NIEER Online Newsletter (October 7, 2005).]

[Request #S53911]

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Integrating and Adapting Infant Mental Health Principles in the Training of Consultants to Childcare. By Kadija Johnston and Charles Brinamen, University of California, San Francisco. IN: Infants and Young Children, vol. 18, no. 4 (October/December 2005) pp. 269-281.

["Because young children increasingly have experience in child care, we must include the quality and impact of their relationships with child care providers in our careful consideration of their mental health. Daycare Consultants, the child care consultation component of the Infant-Parent Program, University of California, San Francisco an infant mental health program, has developed an approach to mental health consultation that focuses on improving the quality of the provider-child relationship through a variety of services — from program consultation that attempts to promote positive interactions among all children and adults to clinical intervention for particularly troubled relationships."]

[Request #S53912]

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STUDIES TO COME
[The following studies, reports, and documents have been ordered or requested, but have not yet arrived. Requests may be placed, and copies will be provided when the material arrives.]

EDUCATION

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

"Maternal Teaching Strategies in Four Cultural Communities." By Xiao-lei Wang, Pace University, and others. IN: Journal of Early Childhood Research, vol. 3, no. 3 (October 2005) pp. 269-288.

["This article examines maternal everyday teaching strategies in Chinese, American, Hutterite, and Native American cultural communities. It moves beyond a theoretical framework based on distancing by suggesting that effective adult teaching strategies are contextually and culturally determined. The authors urge early childhood educators to make efforts to understand the complexity of a child's home learning environment and to maximize the learning potential of every child by taking advantage of his/her funds of knowledge in early childhood education settings."]

[Request #S53913]

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Shared Storybook Reading: Building Young Children's Language and Emergent Literacy Skills. By Helen K. Ezell and Laura M. Justice. (Brookes Publishing Co., Baltimore, Maryland) 2005. 232 p.

["Reading storybooks with young children is one of the most important things adults can do to support early language and literacy skills.... Making the most of shared reading is the goal of this practical guide, ideal for early childhood educators in preschool, Head Start, and child care programs. Step-by-step strategies help educators engage, respond to, and teach young children during storybook reading — information they can share with parents to continue the learning at home."]

[Request #S53914]

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HEALTH

CHILDREN

"The Changing Concept of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome: Diagnostic Coding Shifts, Controversies Regarding the Sleeping Environment, and New Variables to Consider in Reducing Risk." By the American Academy of Pediatrics. Policy Statement. IN: Pediatrics, vol. 116, no. 5 (November 2005) pp. 1245-1255.

Full Text at: www.aap.org/ncepr/revisedsids.pdf

["Despite marked rate reductions over the past decade, SIDS is still responsible for more infant deaths in the United States than any other cause of death during infancy beyond the neonatal period. This statement endorses elements from the 2000 AAP statement that have not changed, includes information about recent research, and presents updated recommendations based on current evidence." MCH Alert (October 14, 2005).]

[Request #S53915]

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