Subject: Studies in the News 06-01 (January 5, 2006)


CALIFORNIA RESEARCH BUREAU
CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY
Studies in the News:
Children and Family Supplement


Contents This Week

Introductory Material CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT
   Mothers in prison
DEMOGRAPHY
   Children on the California border
   Child well-being index
ECONOMY
   California family cost of living
   Family income inequality
EDUCATION
   Aligning prekindergarten with K-3 education
   Educational media for toddlers
   Importance of early language skills
   Reading to disadvantaged preschoolers
   Estimates of universal preschool effects
   Advocating for preschool
   Prekindergarten and school readiness
   Funding and school readiness
   School readiness resources and strategies
HEALTH
   Health care for all kids
   Chemicals in baby products
   SCHIP evaluation
   Environmental health risks
   Medical debt and healthcare access
   Low-income children's health coverage
   Children, families and health coverage
   Young children's healthy mental development
   Overweight children
   Childhood and adult obesity
HUMAN SERVICES
   Child care and obesity prevention
   Child welfare outcomes
   Needs of immigrant families
   Immigrant children's economic security
   Federal policies and immigrant children
STUDIES TO COME
   Arts in education
   Reading to children
   Latino children and medical care
   Young children and trauma
Introduction to Studies in the News

Studies in the News is a very current compilation of items significant to the Legislature and Governor's Office. It is created weekly by the State Library's Research Bureau to supplement the public policy debate in California’s Capitol. To help share the latest information with state policymakers, these reading lists are now being made accessible through the State Library’s website. This week's list of current articles in various public policy areas is presented below.

Service to State Employees:

  • When available, the URL for the full text of each item is provided.

  • California State Employees may contact the State Information & Reference Center (916-654-0206; cslsirc@library.ca.gov) with the SITN issue number and the item number [S#].

  • All other interested individuals should contact their local library - the items may be available there, or may be borrowed by your local library on your behalf.

The following studies are currently on hand:

CRIMINAL JUSTICE & LAW ENFORCEMENT

FAMILIES

War on the Family: Mothers in Prison and the Families They Leave Behind. By Renny Golden. (Routledge, New York, New York) 2005. 190 p.

["Renny Golden documents in painful, intimate detail, the collateral damage of the war on drugs, as lived by children, families, communities, and generations to come. Through Golden's ethnographic eye on everyday lives, we witness how the long arm of the prison industrial complex tears into the fabric of the future when mothers are taken away." Publisher's Announcement (2005) NOTE: War on the Family ... is available for loan.

[Request #S54701]

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DEMOGRAPHY

CHILDREN

A Snapshot of Children on the California Border. By Children Now. Kids Count series. Prepared for the Annie E. Casey Foundation. (Children Now, Oakland, California) 2005. 4 p.

Full Text at: www.childrennow.org/assets/pdf/issues_invest_aecborderkc_2005.pdf

["In the border state of California, many of the area’s children feel close ties to Mexico, Asia and other countries. This Children Now fact sheet examines issues children face on the California-Mexico border, provides characteristics of families and children, and offers recommendations for investments and policy improvements that can strengthen family well-being in the region." Connect for Kids (December 19, 2005) 1.]

[Request #S54702]

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Interpreting the FCD Index of Child Well-Being. By Jared Bernstein and Yulia Fungard. FCD Child Well-Being Index Critical Appraisals, No. 1 (Foundation for Child Development, New York, New York) November 2005. 19 p.

Full Text at: www.fcd-us.org/PDFs/CriticalAppraisals1-Bernstein.pdf

["Jared Bernstein and Yulia Fungard of the Economic Policy Institute take a critical look at what constitutes significant change in the Child Well-Being Index, whether the index just tracks changes in the economy, and whether 'weights' should be added to the indicators." NOTE: See #S50933 for the full "Index of Child Well-Being" report.]

[Request #S54703]

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ECONOMY

COST OF LIVING

Making Ends Meet: How Much Does It Cost to Raise a Family in California? By California Budget Project. (The Project, Sacramento, California) November 2005. 28 p.

Full Text at: www.cbp.org/2005/0509_mem.pdf

[“The report... estimates what it costs to live in 10 regions in the state, either as a single adult or to support a family with two children, allowing only for the basic necessities. The study shows that statewide, families need at least $44,130 per year to pay the bills, and that even basic budgets require incomes much higher than those provided by the minimum wage or federal poverty level.”]

[Request #S54704]

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INCOME INEQUITY

New IRS Data Show Income Inequality is Again on the Rise. By Isaac Shapiro, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. (The Center, Washington, DC) October 17, 2005. 6 p.

Full Text at: www.cbpp.org/10-17-05inc.pdf

["After adjusting for inflation, the after-tax income of the one percent of households with the highest incomes shot up in 2003 by an average of nearly $49,000 per household while the average after-tax incomes of the bottom 75 percent of households fell slightly. The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities has an easy-to-read yet comprehensive examination of the data, and what it means for families." Connect for Kids (October 25, 2005) 1.]

[Request #S54705]

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EDUCATION

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

Getting There: PK-3 as Public Education’s Base Camp. By the Foundation for Child Development. (The Foundation, New York, New York) October 2005. 32 p.

Full Text at: www.fcd-us.org/PDFs/2005AnnualReport1.pdf

["Foundation for Child Deveopment's 2004-2005 annual report, includes an article by Portland Oregonian reporter Bill Graves. The article describes PK-3 programs in New York, Chicago, Seattle, and Union City, NJ. Graves makes the case that PK-3 gets children ready to learn and estimates the cost to implement PK-3 nationwide. There's also a list of PK-3 online resources."]

[Request #S54706]

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A Teacher in the Living Room? Educational Media for Babies, Toddlers and Pre-schoolers. By Michelle M. Garrison, and Dimitri A. Christakis. (Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, Menlo Park, California) December 2005. 56 p.

Full Text at: www.kff.org/entmedia/upload/7427.pdf

["New media products for babies, toddlers and preschoolers began flooding the market in the late 1990's, starting with video series like 'Baby Einstein' and 'Brainy Baby.' But now, the young children's market has exploded into a host of new and more elaborate electronics for pre-schoolers, including video game consoles like the V.Smile and handheld game systems like the Leapster, all marketed as educational. Despite the commercial success, though, this report indicates there is little understanding of how the new media affect young children -- and almost no research to support the idea that they are educational." New York Times (December 15, 2005) A1.]

[Request #S54707]

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At a Loss for Words: How America is Failing Our Children and What We Can Do about It. By Betty Bardige, Temple University. (The University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) 2005. 254 p.

["Drawing on the latest research on development among toddlers and preschoolers, 'At a Loss for Words' lays out the importance of getting parents, policy makers, and child care providers to recognize the role of early literacy skills in reducing the achievement gap that begins before three years of age. Readers are guided through home and classroom settings that promote language, contrasting them with the 'merely mediocre' child care settings in which more and more young children spend increasing amounts of time. Too many of our young children are not receiving the level of input and practice that will enable them to acquire language skills—the key to success in school and life. Bardige explains how to build better community support systems for children, and better public education, in order to ensure that toddlers learn the power of language from their families and teachers." NOTE: At a Loss for Words...is available for loan.]

[Request #S54708]

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LITERACY

"Shared Reading Interactions Between Mothers and Pre-School Children: Case Studies of Three Dyads From a Disadvantaged Community." By Anne Morgan. IN: Journal of Early Childhood Literacy, vol. 5, no. 3 (2005) pp. 279-304.

Full Text at: ecl.sagepub.com/cgi/reprint/5/3/279

["Research has shown that adult-child shared book reading can enhance language and literacy development in the early years, although little is known about how mothers and children from socio-economically disadvantaged communities interact around books. This study investigated the shared reading interactions of three mother-child dyads living in such a community. Mothers were interviewed and videotaped reading at home with their three-year-old children on four separate occasions. The practice of shared reading was found to be common in the homes and mothers felt that reading with their children was important. Videotapes were transcribed and analysed using interpretative methods; this analysis showed substantial differences in the amount and type of interaction for each dyad. Interactions ranged from text focused to participatory. Mothers were tuned to their children’s capabilities and children had developed behaviours that encouraged feedback from their mothers. While many of the behaviours involved simple discussions around illustrations, some sophisticated reading behaviours were also observed."]

[Request #S54709]

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PRESCHOOL

County-level Estimates of the Effects of a Universal Preschool Program in California. By Lynn A. Karoly. Prepared for The David and Lucile Packard Foundation. (RAND Corporation, Santa Monica, California) 2005.

["Los Angeles County would have about 3,300 fewer high school dropouts annually and nearly 10,000 fewer criminal cases filed against juveniles each year if publicly funded preschool were available in California, according to this Rand Corporation report. Every other populous region of the state would see similar benefits, said the study. The data come amid growing talks in California about universal preschool. A ballot initiative, spearheaded by filmmaker Rob Reiner, would tax high-income residents to pay for such a program and is expected to come before voters in June. The new research follows another Rand analysis, concluding that every $1 spent on preschool would generate $2.62 in economic benefits, including reduced juvenile crime, diminished need for special education and fewer students being forced to repeat a grade." ECS e-Clips (December 16, 2005).]

Full Document: 84 p.
http://www.rand.org/pubs/technical_reports/2005/RAND_TR340.pdf

Summary: 18 p.
http://www.rand.org/pubs/technical_reports/2005/RAND_TR340.sum.pdf

[Request #S54710]

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Promoting Preschool in Your Community: How to Piece Together a Successful Strategy. By Fight Crime: Invest in Kids California. (Fight Crime: Invest in Kids California, Oakland, California) 2005. 64 p.

Full Text at: www.fightcrime.org/ca/ppiyc/promotingpreschool.pdf

["In order to increase and sustain investments in preschool, it is essential to develop a broad base of public support at the local level. We have designed this guide so that many resources are specifically tailored to individual counties and reflect the unique needs of diverse communities throughout California. Highlights include: flyers for local constituencies; county-specific data demonstrating the need for preschool press lists and tips for engaging the media; and contact information for diverse preschool advocates."]

[Request #S54711]

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SCHOOL READINESS

The Effects of State Prekindergarten Programs on Young Children’s School Readiness in Five States. By W. Steven Barnett, National Institute for Early Education Research, and others. (The Institute, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey) December 2005.

["This NIEER study of high-quality prekindergarten programs in five states reveals significant improvement in children's early language, literacy and mathematical development, improvement far greater than found in a recent national study of the federal Head Start program. The study finds that children attending state-funded pre-k programs in the five states (Michigan, New Jersey, Oklahoma, South Carolina, and West Virginia) gained significantly regardless of ethnic background or economic circumstances."]

Full Report: 21 p.
nieer.org/resources/research/multistate/fullreport.pdf

Michigan: 15 p.
nieer.org/resources/research/multistate/mi.pdf

New Jersey: 16 p.
nieer.org/resources/research/multistate/nj.pdf

Oklahoma: 16 p.
nieer.org/resources/research/multistate/ok.pdf

South Carolina: 15 p.
nieer.org/resources/research/multistate/sc.pdf

West Virginia: 15 p.
nieer.org/resources/research/multistate/wv.pdf

[Request #S54712]

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Spending Smarter: A Funding Guide for Policymakers and Advocates to Promote Social and Emotional Health and School Readiness. By Kay Johnson and Jane Knitzer. (National Center for Children in Poverty, New York, New York) November 2005.

["Child care providers, teachers, and home visitors all struggle with how to help young children facing risks to early school success related to social and emotional challenges. Spending Smarter is designed to help policymakers, agency officials, families, and other advocates maximize the impact of existing funding streams to support positive social and emotional development, early intervention, and treatment strategies that can improve school readiness."]

Executive Summary: 9 p.
www.nccp.org/media/ss05_sum.pdf

Full Text: 66 p.
www.nccp.org/media/ss05_text.pdf

[Request #S54713]

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Resources to Promote Social and Emotional Health and School Readiness in Young Children and Families: A Community Guide. By Jane Knitzer and Jill Lefkowitz, National Center for Children in Poverty. (The Center, New York, New York) November 2005.

["This guide provides information about resources and strategies that families, child care providers, teachers, and others who come into contact with young children every day can use to help children develop the social and emotional skills they need to succeed in school. Some of the resources and strategies focus on babies and toddlers, others on preschoolers, and still others on young children facing especially harsh early circumstances. All have been used in low-income communities and work best if they are embedded in a larger community effort to promote resilience and build on the strengths that exist in families and communities."]

Executive Summary: 10 p.
www.nccp.org/media/tcl05_sum.pdf

Full Report: 72 p.
www.nccp.org/media/tcl05_text.pdf

[Request #S54714]

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HEALTH

CHILDREN

Governor Blagojevich's All Kids: Health Care for All Kids. By the State of Illinois, Office of the Governor. (The Office, Springfield, Illinois) 2005. 11 p.

Full Text at: www.allkidscovered.com/assets/111505_allkidspresentation.pdf

["Illinois may be leading the pack in health care. The state’s Governor Blagojevich unveiled his 'All Kids' program, which sets monthly premiums and co-payments based on family income. A family of four earning $40,000, for example, would pay a $40 monthly premium per child and a $10 co-pay for doctor visits. Voices for Illinois Children says the plan could provide health insurance to all 253,000 Illinois children who are currently uninsured because their parents make too much for public insurance, but too little to afford private premiums." Connect for Kids (October 10, 2005) 1.]

[Request #S54715]

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The Right Start: the Need to Eliminate Toxic Chemicals from Baby Products. By Meghan Purvis, U.S. PIRG Education Fund, and Rachel Gibson, Environment California Research and Policy Center. (The Center, Los Angeles, California) October 2005. 33 p.

Full Text at: www.environmentcalifornia.org/uploads/B0/av/B0avehMELtJWs0ZmzXiK4w/The_Right_Start.pdf

["Parents have the right to know about the chemicals used in products intended for their children. But even the most educated parent with a scientific or medical background is going to have a hard time shielding his or her child from every harmful or potentially harmful chemical in products and in our environment. In a predicament such as this, the only answer is for our government to move forward to protect our children’s health. Given the mounting scientific evidence demonstrating the harmful effects of many chemicals on the market, elected officials and regulators should exercise precaution by requiring the removal of any unnecessary and potentially hazardous chemicals from children’s products. Regulating toxic chemicals and requiring manufacturers to use safer chemicals wherever possible is a good first step."]

[Request #S54716]

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HEALTH INSURANCE

Congressionally Mandated Evaluation of the State Children’s Health Insurance Program. By Judith Wooldridge, Mathematica Policy Research, and others. (Mathematica Policy Research, Princeton, New Jersey) October 26, 2005.

["Mathematica gives good marks in its report to Congress on the State Children's Health Insurance Programs (SCHIPs) that offer health care coverage to children in families with incomes up to 200 percent of the federal poverty level and beyond. In almost all areas examined – outreach, enrollment and access to services – the programs are succeeding. In the 10 states studied, programs were put in place quickly, and overall, families were satisfied with the ease of enrolling children, many of whom remained enrolled for 12 months, depending on the state." Connect for Kids (November 21, 2005) 1.]

Executive Summary. 12 p.
http://www.mathematica-mpr.com/publications/pdfs/schipcongresssumm.pdf

Final Report to Congress. 102 p.
http://www.mathematica-mpr.com/publications/PDFs/schipcongress.pdf

[Request #S54717]

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HEALTHY FAMILIES

Environmental Health Risks to Infants, Toddlers, and Families [Issue Theme.] IN: Zero to Three, vol. 26, no.2. (November 2005) pp. 1-50.

[Includes: "Child Health and the Environment: A Review of the Evidence;" "Environmental Exposures and Children's Health Challenges;" "Safeguarding Our Children at Home: Reducing Exposures to Toxic Chemicals and Heavy Metals;" and others. NOTE: Zero to Three ... is available for loan.

[Request #S54718]

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INSURANCE

Medical Debt and Access to Care. By Catherine Hoffman and others, Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured. (Kaiser Family Foundation, Washington, DC) September 2005.

["This study finds that people with private coverage who have problems paying their medical bills –- most of whom work full-time and are middle-class -- will limit their care in many of the same ways as those who have no health insurance at all. The report underscores the fact that rising medical debt is a significant problem for millions of American families from all walks of life." Connect for Kids (October 3, 2005) 1.]

Executive Summary. 9 p.
http://www.kff.org/uninsured/upload/7403ES.pdf

Full Report. 32 p.
http://www.kff.org/uninsured/upload/Medicaid-Debt-and-Access-to-Health-Care-Report.pdf

[Request #S54719]

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MEDICAID

Differences that Make a Difference: Comparing Medicaid and the State Children’s Health Insurance Program Federal Benefit Standards. By Cindy Mann and Elizabeth Kenny. Issue Brief. (Georgetown University Health Policy Institute, Center for Children and Families, Washington, DC) October 2005. 8 p.

Full Text at: www.cbpp.org/10-25-05health3.pdf

["The principle that children ought to have access to the health care they need enjoys broad support. Consistent with this principle, Congress has long required states, as a condition of receiving federal Medicaid funding, to provide children with comprehensive coverage under their state Medicaid programs. This broad coverage standard is particularly important for Medicaid-eligible children whose health care needs are often greater than the norm and whose families’ limited incomes make it difficult for them to afford care that Medicaid does not cover. In the context of the federal budget debate, Congress is considering a proposal advanced by the National Governors Association to replace these rules for some children with a benefits standard modeled after the State Children’s Health Insurance Program (SCHIP). This Issue Brief analyzes the profound differences between these two standards and the health care guarantees that children would lose if the Medicaid standard was replaced by SCHIP-like rules."]

[Request #S54720]

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In a Time of Growing Need: State Choices Influence Health Coverage Access for Children and Families. By Donna Cohen Ross and Laura Cox, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. (Kaiser Family Foundation, Washington, DC) October 2005.

["The nation’s progress in reducing the number of uninsured people suffered another setback in 2004, as the number of Americans without health insurance rose for the fourth consecutive year. However, also for the fourth consecutive year, increased enrollment in Medicaid and the State Children’s Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) partially offset the decline in job-based health coverage, preventing the number of uninsured Americans from rising even faster. Whether Medicaid and SCHIP will continue to be able to respond to growing health insurance needs depends in part on whether state policies in these programs make publicly funded coverage more available to those who need it, or less so."]

Executive Summary. 5 p.
http://www.kff.org/medicaid/upload/In-a-Time-of-Growing-Need-State-Choices-Influence-Health-Coverage-Access-for-Children-and-Families-Report-executive-summary.pdf

Full Report. 80 p.
http://www.kff.org/medicaid/upload/In-a-Time-of-Growing-Need-State-Choices-Influence-Health-Coverage-Access-for-Children-and-Families-Report.pdf

[Request #S54721]

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MENTAL HEALTH

State Approaches to Promoting Young Children’s Healthy Mental Development: A Survey of Medicaid, and Maternal and Child Health, and Mental Health Agencies. By Jill Rosenthal and Neva Kaye. (National Academy for State Health Policy, Portland, Maine) November 2005. 144 p.

Full Text at: www.cmwf.org/usr_doc/rosenthal_CW12_final.pdf

["Ensuring the social and emotional well-being of young children is essential to school readiness, academic success, and overall healthy development.... A report examines how states are promoting the healthy mental development of children age 3 and under. Based on a survey of Medicaid and maternal, child health, and children's mental health agencies across the nation, this study looks at critical issues confronting states, from program funding concerns to the availability of qualified mental health providers. The authors also highlight common approaches to addressing these issues, as well as promising new initiatives under way to improve service delivery and financing."]

[Request #S54722]

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OBESITY

Super Sized Kids: How to Rescue Your Child from the Obesity Threat. By Walt Larimore and others. (Center Street, New York, New York) 2005. 306 p.

["Overweight and obese children tend to grow up to be overweight and obese adults.... We all know how important nutrition and exercise are, but what effects do sleep, television, computers, the Internet, video games, and advertising have on our kids' health? ... And what can you do to make changes at your children's schools, as well as in your town and your state, to improve their overall quality of life?" NOTE: Super Sized Kids...is available for loan]

[Request #S54723]

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Arizona Nutrition and Physical Activity State Plan: A Comprehensive Plan to Reduce Chronic Disease & Obesity in Arizona. (Arizona Department of Health Services, Phoenix, Arziona) 2005. 104 p.

Full Text at: www.azdhs.gov/phs/oncdps/opp/pdf/opp6.pdf

["Never mind taking candy from a baby, as the old saying goes, Arizona doesn't want its young citizens to have it in the first place. A state Department of Health Services pilot program to improve nutrition at child-care centers in six cities is under way, part of the state's 6-month-old obesity plan. Child-care workers in Phoenix, Scottsdale, Mesa, Tucson, Flagstaff and Chino Valley are being trained to model healthful eating habits for the babies and preschoolers in their care; parents are being educated, too. Waiting until kids get to elementary school is too late, said Lisa DeMarie, nutrition coordinator in the Office of Chronic Disease Prevention and Nutrition Services." Arizona Republic (September 28, 2005) 1.]

[Request #S54724]

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HUMAN SERVICES

CHILD CARE

"The Role of Child Care Providers in the Prevention of Childhood Overweight." By Kathleen Sellers, State University of New York, and others. IN: Journal of Early Childhood Research, vol. 3, no. 3 (October 2005) pp. 227-242.

Full Text at: ecr.sagepub.com/cgi/reprint/3/3/227

["This qualitative study determined the role of childcare professionals in the prevention of childhood overweight. Facilitated focus group sessions were conducted with childcare professionals to ascertain their beliefs and practices in four domains: 1) foods and beverages; 2) physical activity; 3) TV, video, and computer game viewing; and 4) behaviors with respect to eating and/or activity. The researchers and childcare staff then collaboratively identified ways to develop innovative policy and environmental changes to improve the health and fitness of young children. Though more research is needed, engaging the support of the childcare profession is a promising avenue to improve the health and fitness of young children."]

[Request #S53614]

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CHILDREN

Child Welfare Outcomes 2002: Annual Report. (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Administration on Children, Youth and Families, Children's Bureau, Washington, DC) 2005.

Full Text at: www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/pubs/cwo02/index.htm

["Now in its fifth year, this report provides data on the performance of States in meeting the needs of children and families who come into contact with the child welfare system. Two Federal data reporting systems are used to gather data on seven outcomes: reduce recurrence of child maltreatment; reduce maltreatment in foster care; increase permanency for children in foster care; reduce time in foster care to reunification; reduce time in foster care to adoption; increase placement stability; and reduce placement of young children in group homes and institutions. Additional information from the Child and Family Service Reviews provides context for the results observed in each State." HandsNet (October 5, 2005) online.]

[Request #S54725]

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Efforts to Promote Children’s Economic Security Must Address Needs of Hard-Working Immigrant Families. (National Center for Children in Poverty, New York, New York) October 2005. 4 p.

Full Text at: www.nccp.org/media/epc05_text.pdf

["Virtually all immigrant families are headed by working parents, but low wages and a lack of employer benefits mean that their children are disproportionately likely to be low income and experience other hardships. Efforts to promote the economic security of America’s children must include the children of immigrants -— most of whom are U.S. citizens who will remain here for life."]

[Request #S54726]

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State Policies Can Promote Immigrant Children’s Economic Security. By Kinsey Alden Dinan, National Center for Children in Poverty. Children in Low-Income Immigrant Families Policy Brief. (The Center, New York, New York) October 2005. 12 p.

Full Text at: www.nccp.org/media/spc05_text.pdf

["While federal policies exclude many legal immigrants from key public benefits, some states have stepped in to fill the gap. States can offer critical assistance to children in low-income immigrant families by using their own funds to provide them with the supports available to native-born families."]

[Request #S54727]

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Federal Policies Restrict Immigrant Children’s Access to Key Public Benefits. By Kinsey Alden Dinan, National Center for Children in Poverty. Children in Low-Income Immigrant Families Policy Brief. (The Center, New York, New York) October 2005. 12 p.

Full Text at: www.nccp.org/media/fpr05_text.pdf

["More than one-quarter of all low-income children in the United States are children of immigrants. Virtually all of these children have parents who work, but their parents are more likely than native-born parents to receive low wages, and less likely to receive employer benefits. At the same time, federal policies limit their families’ access to income and employment support programs that can help bridge the gap between low earnings and basic family needs. Such policies leave children in immigrant families -— most of whom are U.S. citizens -— at risk of not getting their basic needs met, with important implications for America’s future."]

[Request #S54728]

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STUDIES TO COME
[The following studies, reports, and documents have been ordered or requested, but have not yet arrived. Requests may be placed, and copies will be provided when the material arrives.]

EDUCATION

ART EDUCATION

Third Space: When Learning Matters. By Richard J. Deasy and Lauren M. Stevenson. (Arts Education Partnership, Washington, DC) 2005. 174 p.

["'Third Space' tells the riveting story of the profound changes in the lives of kids, teachers, and parents in ten economically disadvantaged communities across the country that place their bets on the arts as a way to create great schools. The schools become caring communities where kids - many of whom face challenges of poverty, the need to learn English, and to surmount learning difficulties - thrive and succeed and where teachers find new joy and satisfaction in teaching. ]

[Request #S54729]

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EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

Shared Storybook Reading: Building Young Children's Language and Emergent Literacy Skills. By Helen K. Ezell and Laura M. Justice. (Brookes Publishing Co., Baltimore, Maryland) 2005. 232 p.

["Reading storybooks with young children is one of the most important things adults can do to support early language and literacy skills.... Making the most of shared reading is the goal of this practical guide, ideal for early childhood educators in preschool, Head Start, and child care programs. Step-by-step strategies help educators engage, respond to, and teach young children during storybook reading — information they can share with parents to continue the learning at home."]

[Request #S53914]

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HEALTH

CHILDREN

Disparities for Latino Children in the Timely Receipt of Medical Care. By David C. Brousseau, and others. IN: Ambulatory Pediatrics, vol. 5, no.6 (November 2005) pp. 319-325.

["The purpose of the study described in this article was to determine whether Latino children have lower quality of care (as reported by parents), with respect to timeliness, compared with non-Latino white children and non-Latino African-American children.... The authors found that... after adjustment for demographic and access factors, Latino children continued to experience significantly lower-quality timely medical care than white and African-American children with respect to the overall composite, routine care, phone help, and wait time with an appointment.... The authors conclude that 'these findings suggest that improvements are needed in the delivery and efficiency of medical care for Latino children.'" MCH Alert (December 2, 2005) 1.]

[Request #S54730]

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MENTAL HEALTH

Hope and Healing: A Caregiver's Guide to Helping Young Children Affected by Trauma. By Kathleen Fitzgerald Rice and Betsy Groves McAlister. (Zero to Three, Washington, DC) 2005. 68 p.

["In recent years, therapists, educators and researchers have learned a great deal about children and trauma. Findings suggest that recovery often depends on early childhood professionals who understand children and trauma and have the skills to help children and support families. 'Hope and Healing' is a guide for early childhood professionals who care for children in a variety of early care and education settings. The authors define trauma and help readers recognize its effects on young children. They also offer tips, resources, and proven intervention strategies for working with traumatized children and their families and for managing stress."]

[Request #S54215]

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